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Showing posts from July 8, 2011

The Investigation of the Specifics of the Text p 115 This is where the heavy “detail” work is done. Approximately 30 percent of one’s preparation time may need to be used here. Attention to detail is now the priority. God chose to use specific words to communicate His truth; therefore, we need to study those words. It is possible, and even easy, to miss details. Just as details of a conversation can be missed, so the student of the text can miss what is there. The concern of the preacher in this part of the preparation process is to see, view, and seek to understand what is written, in detail. The preacher seeks to understand the original intended meaning of the text in context. What is actually said in the text? What is the text about? How does the text say what is says? Why does the text say what it says? What does the text do as an active form of communication? Such questions and many more are to be raised and answered at this time. We are working towards a description of the main theme or themes of the text, the thoughts or movements that make up the theme(s), and the thrust or impact of the text. These will be homiletical categories later, but here we must first seek a basic understanding of the text. That understanding is based initially upon the original meaning of the text as intended by the human author under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. To “get at” the meaning expressed in and through the details of the text, we must consider the text syntactically and verbally. In other words, we must view the text as a meaningful combination of words as well as individual words that have meaning. Syntax has to do with “the way in which words are put together to form phrases, clauses, or sentences.”12 We must read the text as it was intended to be read, recognizing the flow of words and their interrelationship. Within that flow, individual words make their specific contributions to the meaning of the text. For the preacher to understand the text as a whole, the parts of the text must be viewed along with the words within the parts. Details within details within details! These are the basic data for the investigation. Stephen F. Olford and David L. Olford, Anointed Expository Preaching (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1998). 114-15.

The Investigation of the Specifics of the Text p 115 This is where the heavy “detail” work is done. Approximately 30 percent of one’s preparation time may need to be used here. Attention to detail is now the priority. God chose to use specific words to communicate His truth; therefore, we need to study those words. It is possible, and even easy, to miss details. Just as details of a conversation can be missed, so the student of the text can miss what is there. The concern of the preacher in this part of the preparation process is to see, view, and seek to understand what is written, in detail. The preacher seeks to understand the original intended meaning of the text in context. What is actually said in the text? What is the text about? How does the text say what is says? Why does the text say what it says? What does the text do as an active form of communication? Such questions and many more are to be raised and answered at this time. We are working towards a description of the ma…