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Showing posts from December 23, 2011

The Magnificat

Until Christmas day, this daily e-mailing will lead you the reader's up to Christmas day with biblical details of Jesus' birth from the pregnancy of Mary his mother by the Holy Spirit of YHWH. Remember that the celebration of Christmas is for Jesus' birth and not the giving of gifts to each other. JESUS IS THE REASON FOR THE SEASON. Travel with the ministry for the next 3 days to Christmas with biblical chronology of His birth. Lets remember that Jesus' exact birth date is unknown. - Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy Note: The Magnificat is one of the Bible's most beautiful songs of praise to God recorded. Read: Luke 1:46-55 MAGNIFICAT [măg nĭfˊə kăt].† The name commonly given to Mary’s song of praise (Luke 1:46–55), from the first word of the Latin translation of the song: “Magnificat anima mea Dominum.…” Like the related songs in 1:68–79; 2:29–32, the Magnificat represents what would be expected of common Palestinian Jews such as the speakers are portrayed. What is hoped …

Amazing Grace : 366 Inspiring Hymn Stories for Daily Devotions

December 23 I HEARD THE BELLS ON CHRISTMAS DAY Henry W. Longfellow, 1807–1882 And He will be their peace. (Micah 5:5) The cruel miseries caused by the Civil War greatly distressed the beloved American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. With heaviness of spirit he put his thoughts into words to create this fine carol. Since he was the most influential American poet of his day, Longfellow brought fresh courage and renewed faith to many of his countrymen who read this poem. Although he was a member of the Unitarian church, he maintained a strong belief in God’s goodness and personal concern for His people. “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” was written in 1864 for the Sunday school of the Unitarian Church of the Disciples in Boston, Massachusetts. It originally had seven stanzas and was titled “Christmas Bells.” References to the Civil War are prevalent in the omitted verses. The plain, direct wording of the present five stanzas gives this clear message: God is still in command and …

Fresh Start Devotionals

Costly Christmas Is Christmas too costly? The average American will spend more than $800.00 on Christmas this year, according to the CNN Financial Network. Is this too much? Are there ways to cut costs and still celebrate Christmas? There is no way to answer those questions without first coming to grips with what you want to accomplish this Christmas. Exorbitant spending will be necessary if your goal is to impress people, but modest spending is sufficient to express your appreciation or affection for your friends and family. This Christmas, my goal is, “to celebrate Jesus’s birth by worshiping with my Church, and cherishing my family. I will express my love by giving of my time, attention and gifts.” In making out your gift list, don’t neglect non monetary expressions of your love. Wives, would you like to get a love letter from your husband attached to his gift to you? Children, would you like to get an entire afternoon of your Dad’s time? Husbands, would you like a romantic eve…