Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from April 9, 2012
Honoring Your Mother

“Children, obey your parents because you belong to the Lord, for this is the right thing to do. [2] ‘Honor your father and mother.’ This is the first of the Ten Commandments that ends with a promise. [3] And this is the promise: If you honor your father and mother, ‘you will live a long life, full of blessing.’ ” (Ephes. 6:1–3 NLT)

In this passage, Paul instructs children to honor their parents. His command is a direct reference to the fifth commandment. What does it mean to “honor your parents?” Well, the meaning is a bit complex. In the Ten Commandments, it is clear that it has financial ramifications as does our word honorarium. In the ancient near east, the only means of support an aged parent would have is from their children. That’s why the command has a promise. To paraphrase, “your children are more likely to provide for you if you will provide for your parents.”

But it is clear that honor in this text has other meanings too. In his commentary, William Bar…

Amazing Grace Devotions

April 9

THE OLD RUGGED CROSS
Words and Music by George Bennard, 1873–1958
  He Himself bore our sins in His body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; by His wounds you have been healed. (1 Peter 2:24)
The author and composer of this beloved hymn, George Bennard, began his Christian ministry in the ranks of the Salvation Army. Eight years later he was ordained by the Methodist Episcopal church, where his devoted ministry as an evangelist was highly esteemed for many years.
One time, after returning to his home in Albion, Michigan, Bennard passed through a particularly trying experience, one that caused him to reflect seriously about the significance of the cross and what the apostle Paul meant when he spoke of entering into the fellowship of Christ’s sufferings (Philippians 3:10). George Bennard began to spend long hours in study, prayer, and meditation until one day he could say:
  I saw the Christ of the cross as if I were seeing John 3:16 leave the pri…
April 9




THE OLD RUGGED CROSS
Words and Music by George Bennard, 1873–1958
  He Himself bore our sins in His body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; by His wounds you have been healed. (1 Peter 2:24)
The author and composer of this beloved hymn, George Bennard, began his Christian ministry in the ranks of the Salvation Army. Eight years later he was ordained by the Methodist Episcopal church, where his devoted ministry as an evangelist was highly esteemed for many years.
One time, after returning to his home in Albion, Michigan, Bennard passed through a particularly trying experience, one that caused him to reflect seriously about the significance of the cross and what the apostle Paul meant when he spoke of entering into the fellowship of Christ’s sufferings (Philippians 3:10). George Bennard began to spend long hours in study, prayer, and meditation until one day he could say:
  I saw the Christ of the cross as if I were seeing John 3:16 leave the pr…

Fresh Start Devotionals

Hole in the Head

Try as she might, Janet couldn’t focus. She tried to listen as Dan explained to her what it meant to be a Christ follower and how she could have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, but she just couldn’t get it.

But she didn’t give up. She returned week after week to the “New Beginnings” class at her Northern California Church and listened as Dan patiently told her again how she could know Christ, but it just didn’t register.

There was a fog she couldn’t get through. And then there were the headaches and the fainting spells.


What was happening?

The last thing she remembered was walking into the kitchen.

The doctors explained to her that her friend found her, unconscious on the floor and rushed her to the hospital. After extensive testing they believe she has a brain tumor that needs to be removed.

Janet signed the permission form and the doctors cut a hole in her head to remove the tumor. When she recovered, the fog was gone and she could concentrate again.

She …