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The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2012–2013, ed.

February 17 Lesson 12 CLOTHED WITH CHRIST
DEVOTIONAL READING: Psalm 107:1–9
BACKGROUND SCRIPTURE: Colossians 3




KEY VERSE
Above all these things put on charity, which is the bond of perfectness.Colossians 3:14


The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2012–2013, ed. Ronald L. Nickelson and Jonathan Underwood (Cincinnati, OH: Standard, 2012). 209.


The NIV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2012–2013, ed.

February 17 Lesson 12 CLOTHED WITH CHRIST
DEVOTIONAL READING: Psalm 107:1–9
BACKGROUND SCRIPTURE: Colossians 3


COLOSSIANS 3:5–17


KEY VERSE
Over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity.Colossians 3:14



The NIV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2012–2013, ed. Ronald L. Nickelson and Jonathan Underwood (Cincinnati, OH: Standard, 2012). 209.

Preach for a Year

p 41  
    Three Crosses on Calvary’s Hill


Series on the Cross      Luke 23:33–43
  I.      Introduction
         A.      Three Great Incentives to Life for Christ
         1.      The Holiness of our God (Isa. 6)
         2.      The return of Christ (1 John 2:28)
         3.      The cross: The greatest demonstration of His holiness and love
         B.      Let us Look to Calvary
         1.      Jesus dying there with two thieves: One on either side
         2.      One dying for sin. One dying in sin. One dying to sin
         3.      Two were completely guilty. One completely innocent
         4.      Two paying their debt to society. One paying OUR debt of sin
II.      Body
A.      Look to Calvary and see two men in the same Condemnation (vv. 39–40)
         1.      The mockery of the first thief
         2.      The other thief and his remarkable observations:
           a.      States a great spiritual truth
           b.      Recognizes his own guilt (v. 41)
         3.     …

Twelve Months of Sundays: Reflections on Bible Readings, Year B

Proper 2


2 Kings 5:1–14
1 Corinthians 9:24–27
Mark 1:40–45


Naaman’s wife’s maid knew more about Elisha’s healing powers than the king of Israel. All the king could do was tear his clothes and rage against his Syrian counterpart, suspecting that a request for healing was a disguised excuse for renewed hostility in their already long-running, and still continuing, border disputes. In such a setting, a concession or a friendly request or gesture is instantly regarded with suspicion. As we know, three thousand years of tussling over territory is not easily forgotten.
Could Naaman’s own story—including the verses after our passage ends—indicate ways forward? He, too, one of the great ones in that little world, has to learn from his servants what he could not see for himself: that the humiliation which leads to health is better than the pride which leaves you a leper. The rivers of Damascus were indeed greater than the muddy stream of Jordan, but they had never parted to let God’s people throu…

Christian Worship One Year Lectionary

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 | LENT
FIRST SUNDAY IN LENT

   Old Testament Genesis 3:1–15
Psalm       Psalm 91
     New Testament 2 Corinthians 6:1–10
 GospelMatthew 4:1–11


Christian Worship One Year Lectionary (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009).

United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 | LENT
FIRST SUNDAY IN LENT
YEAR C

Old TestamentDeuteronomy 26:1–11
 Psalm Psalm 91:1–2, 9–16 (UMH 810)
         New Testament Romans 10:8b–13
     Gospel  Luke 4:1–13


Vanderbilt Divinity Library, United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009).

Catholic Lectionary

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 | LENT
FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT
YEAR C

              First Reading       Deuteronomy 26:4–10
              Response       Psalm 91:15b
Psalm       Psalm 91:1–2, 10–15
              Second Reading       Romans 10:8–13
Gospel Acclamation       Matthew 4:4b
Gospel       Luke 4:1–13


Catholic Lectionary (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009).

Morning and Evening: Daily Readings, Complete and unabridged; New modern edition

Morning, February 17      Go To Evening Reading

         “Isaac dwelt by the well Lahai-roi.” 
         — Genesis 25:11

Hagar had once found deliverance there and Ishmael had drank from the water so graciously revealed by the God who liveth and seeth the sons of men; but this was a merely casual visit, such as world-lings pay to the Lord in times of need, when it serves their turn. They cry to him in trouble, but forsake him in prosperity. Isaac dwelt there, and made the well of the living and all-seeing God his constant source of supply. The usual tenor of a man’s life, the dwelling of his soul, is the true test of his state. Perhaps the providential visitation experienced by Hagar struck Isaac’s mind, and led him to revere the place; its mystical name endeared it to him; his frequent musings by its brim at eventide made him familiar with the well; his meeting Rebecca there had made his spirit feel at home near the spot; but best of all, the fact that he there enjoyed fellowship with …

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

February 17: Finding Sustainable
John 6:52–71

Following Jesus isn’t like developing a crisis-aversion system. So often, it’s tempting to treat our faith in this way—relying on Him when things get tough or when others expect us to do so. But He wants us to rely on Him continually.
After Jesus miraculously fed the crowds, He told them that He was the bread of life. But they were fickle. They wanted evidence—another sign. Instead of feeding their transient desires, Jesus delivered hard teaching: “The one who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day. For my flesh is true food, and my blood is true drink. The one who eats my flesh and drinks my blood resides in me and I in him” (John 6:54–56).
For the Jews, this teaching would have been shocking and strange—drinking blood was forbidden by Old Testament law, and He was speaking about His own body. They followed Jesus because they wanted a sign, a prophet, or a Messiah. A sacrifice was not pa…