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Showing posts from August 22, 2013

How to Study the Bible's Key Themes

How to Study the Bible’s Key Themes  |  Tue, August 20, 2013  | MISC0 The Bible wasn’t written as a subject-by-subject textbook—its themes and topics are all spread out. That where Logos 5’s Topic Guide comes in. With the Topic Guide, it’s easy to study the Bible by subject: just search and go! Explore topics in depth: In addition to biblical texts, you’ll be prompted with relevant material from your library, giving you a deeper understanding of even the most complex biblical topics. Discover biblical connections: Never miss a related verse. The Topic Guide connects passages from your Bible in a network of themes and concepts. As you delve into your topic, you can always get more specific or more general—jumping from “baptism” to “infant baptism,” for example. Make a message: Need some inspiration for your sermon or lecture? The Topic Guide is a great way to get started. Then launch the Sermon Starter Guide from the Topic Guide for more teaching and preaching ideas. * * * Le…

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional, vols.

August 22: Complaints
Job 10:1–10

Complaining can be automatic. We complain about the weather, our children, our jobs. And we might do it for any number of reasons—even something as trivial as to keep a conversation going. Although we might complain lightly, we still betray something about our hearts. We assume that we are owed something—that we are entitled.
We might readily admit this. We might freely say that this should not be our posture before people or before God. But Job challenges our stereotype of the complainer. What can we learn from his complaints? In his outcries, we find someone struggling to understand his situation before God. He prays, “My inner self loathes my life; I want to give vent to my complaint; I want to speak out of the bitterness of my inner self. I will say to God, ‘You should not condemn me; let me know why you contend against me’ ” (Job 10:1–2). He repeats and recasts his elevated and prolonged complaints in surprising similes: “Did you not pour me out l…