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International Sunday School Lesson

LessonOctober 13, 2013 A Promise to Sarah By Sam E. Stone When God originally called Abram (as he was then known) to leave his home in Ur of the Chaldeans, he summarized the blessings that would follow (Genesis 12:1-3). Abram was 75 years old at the time. He and his family went to Canaan and from there to Egypt to secure food during a famine. He and his nephew Lot separated upon their return to the promised land.Once more God reaffirmed his covenant with Abram (Genesis 15:1-5). Sarai, Abram’s wife, still had borne no children. She encouraged her husband to marry her Egyptian maidservant, Hagar (Gen.16:1-4). Hagar conceived and had a son (Ishmael), but Sarai mistreated her and she fled. God appeared to Abram once again when he was 99 years old (17:1). He told him that his name would now be Abraham, “a father of many nations.” Canaan would be his inheritance. The Lord commanded him to keep the covenant of circumcision with every male among the people. Prediction Genesis 17:15-17Like Abraha…

The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2013–2014

October 13
Lesson 7
A PROMISE TO SARAH

DEVOTIONAL READING: Isaiah 51:1–6 BACKGROUND SCRIPTURE: Genesis 17:15–17; 18:9–15; 21:1–7
GENESIS 17:15–17
KEY VERSE Sarah conceived, and bare Abraham a son in his old age, at the set time of which God had spoken to him.—Genesis 21:2
LESSON AIMS After participating in this lesson, each student will be able to: 1. Describe the reactions of Abraham and Sarah to the promise of a son. 2. Explain the significance of laughing in each section of today’s text. 3. Suggest a way to show God that he or she trusts God’s plans.

LESSON OUTLINE
Introduction       A.      Making Promises       B.      Lesson Background       I.      Prediction (GENESIS 17:15–17)       A.      Name Given (v. 15)       Your New Name       B.      Son Promised (v. 16)       C.      Father Laughs (v. 17)       II.      Promise (GENESIS 18:9–15)       A.      Listening and Laughing (vv. 9–12)       B.      Response and Reaction (vv. 13–15)   III.      Fulfillment (GENESIS 21:1–7)       A.     …

United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 | AFTER PENTECOST
PROPER 23
YEAR C

             Old Testament       Jeremiah 29:1, 4–7
             Psalm       Psalm 66:1–12 (UMH 790)
             New Testament       2 Timothy 2:8–15
             Gospel       Luke 17:11–19


Vanderbilt Divinity Library. United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 | AFTER PENTECOST
PROPER 23
YEAR C


  Old Testament & Psalm, Option I
Old Testament Jeremiah 29:1, 4–7
 Psalm    Psalm 66:1–12
  or
  Old Testament & Psalm, Option II
 Old Testament 2 Kings 5:1–3, 7–15c
Psalm Psalm 111

             New Testament       2 Timothy 2:8–15
             Gospel       Luke 17:11–19


Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 | PENTECOST
PROPER 23
YEAR C

 Old Testament Ruth 1:1–19a
 Psalm Psalm 111
Epistle   2 Timothy 2:1–13
Gospel   Luke 17:11–19


Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009.

Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 | TRINITY
TWENTIETH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY

Old TestamentIsaiah 55:1–9
 PsalmPsalm 27:1–9
Epistle  Ephesians 5:15–21
Gospel   Matthew 22:1–14 or Matthew 21:33–44


Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

October 13: The Last Person You Would Expect
Ezekiel 26:1–27:36; Revelation 13:1–10

Yahweh is capable of doing anything and everything He pleases. If He were not a good God, this would be deeply frightening, but considering His wonderful character, this is comforting.
In Ezekiel 26:1–6, Yahweh describes the sins of Tyre and His plans against the powerful Phoenician city-state. The people of Tyre are arrogant. They do as they please, usually to the detriment of other people. Yahweh refuses to put up with this any longer. When He finally destroys Tyre, He does it through unexpected means: Nebuchadnezzar, king of the Neo-Babylonian empire from 605–562 BC. Despite Nebuchadnezzar’s cruel and ruthless nature, Yahweh uses him to enact punishment on Tyre (Ezek 26:7).
Stories like this make me wonder how written prophecy would look today. How often would we see God use people without their realizing it? How many evil-hearted people have been used for a larger and better purpose?
We’re never real…