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The New American Commentary

Watching Our Words Excerpt ‎The use of the tongue is the theme of this collection, and each verse is merismatic. Verses 20–21 closely parallel each other and can be regarded as a proverb pair. Verse 19 then is an ironic heading to vv. 20–21: Although the wise person gives sound advice, wisdom is found more in those who are silent than in those who are verbose! The message here is that you should be careful about who you listen to and that when a person talks too much, that is a good sign that his words are not worth hearing.
Garrett, Duane A. Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs. Vol. 14. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1993. Print. The New American Commentary.

The New American Commentary

Priestly Division of AbijahLuke 1:15 Excerpt ‎The service of the temple was divided into twenty-four divisions, and each provided for the needs of the temple service for a week at a time, twice a year. During the major religious festivals (Passover, Pentecost, and the Feast of Tabernacles) all the divisions served.
Stein, Robert H. Luke. Vol. 24. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1992. Print. The New American Commentary.

The New American Commentary

The Father and The SonJohn 1:14 Excerpt ‎The mention of the Father and the stress on the uniqueness of Jesus reminds the reader of the opening verse of the Prologue. This discussion has thus come full circle, and in doing so it presents a tightly constructed, complex introductory theological rationale for reading this Gospel. But reading is not to be merely an intellectual exercise. Instead, Jesus’ purpose in coming to the world was to empower people to become children of God (1:12). Likewise the purpose of the incarnate Logos and the purpose of the entire Gospel are one in focus because the Gospel was written to engender believing in this Jesus to the end that readers might experience the transformation of life (20:30–31).
Borchert, Gerald L. John 1–11. Vol. 25A. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1996. Print. The New American Commentary.

Prayer

Prayer  Heavenly Father, thank You for this morning awakening to a day that I have not seen; You have not promise that I will see the end of this day, But I just want to say now, thank You from the bottom of my heart. Hallelujah! Bless the churches that teach and preach You Word as written; Bless those that want to go to church and cannot because of their infirmities; Bless those that read this prayer and are secular that their heart will be pricked and they COME to Your Son Jesus genuinely for the remission of their sins;  Accepting Him as their Lord and Savior, and IMMEDIATELYYour Spirit will indwell in them for the remainder of their earthly lives. Hallelujah! Now Father, bless me with Your blessings. In Jesus' name I pray. Amen. - Min. Lynwood F. Mundy

The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2013–2014. Ed.

December 1
Lesson 1
THE ANGEL FORETELLS JESUS’ BIRTHDEVOTIONAL READING: Psalm 89:1–7BACKGROUND SCRIPTURE: Luke 1:26–45LUKE 1:26–40LESSON AIMS
After participating in this lesson, each student will be able to:
1. Retell the story of the angel’s announcement to Mary that she would give birth to the Son of God.
2. Explain the significance of Gabriel’s statements and Mary’s responses in the story’s setting.
3. Write a statement of faith expressing belief in and the significance of the virgin birth.
LESSON OUTLINE Introduction       A.      Destination Unknown
      B.      Lesson Background: Foreign Domination
      C.      Lesson Background: Marriage Customs
      I.      Humble Setting (LUKE 1:26–29)
      A.      Unremarkable Town (v. 26)
      B.      Unmarried Virgin (v. 27)
      C.      Unexpected Blessing (vv. 28, 29)
  II.      Surprising Announcement (LUKE 1:30–33)
      A.      Special Favor (v. 30)
      B.      Specific Name (v. 31)
      C.      Superior Kingdom (vv. 32, 33)
    …

International Sunday School Lesson, © 2009

Lesson for December 1, 2013 The Angel Foretells Jesus’ BirthLuke 1:26-45By Sam E. Stone For the next two months our lessons are taken from Luke’s Gospel, presenting “Jesus and the Just Reign of God.”Luke is the longest of the four Gospels and, in fact, is the longest book in the New Testament. Angels are shown throughout to be special messengers from God. Early in chapter one, Luke records the visit of the angel Gabriel when he brought hope to a priest, Zechariah (Luke 1:8-23). He and his wife, Elizabeth, had no children and they were “both well along in years.” The angel told him his wife would bear a son (John the Baptist) who would prepare the way for the coming Messiah.
Humble SettingLuke 1:26-29Mary lived in Nazareth, a small town in southern Galilee. H. Lynn Gardner notes, “It was one of the most unlikely places for the Messiah to be raised from the viewpoint of the leading Jews in Jerusalem. They viewed with contempt the unlettered country people from Galilee (see John 1:46).”
Mar…

Christian Worship One Year Lectionary

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2013 | END TIME
LAST SUNDAY OF END TIME
CHRIST THE KING

 Old Testament Isaiah 51:4–8
Psalm Psalm 45
New Testament Revelation 1:9–18
Gospel John 


Christian Worship One Year Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2013 | ADVENT
FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT
YEAR A

     Old Testament   Isaiah 2:1–5
 Psalm Psalm 122 (UMH 845)
New TestamentRomans 13:11–14
   GospelMatthew 24:36–44


Vanderbilt Divinity Library. United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2013 | ADVENT
FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT
YEAR A

PsalmPsalm 122
             First Reading       Isaiah 2:1–5
             Second Reading       Romans 13:8–14
 Gospel       Matthew 24:37–44


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2013 | ADVENT
FIRST SUNDAY IN ADVENT
YEAR A

 Old Testament Isaiah 2:1–5
     Psalm     Psalm 122
 Epistle       (Romans 13:8–10) 11–14
   Gospel   Matthew 21:1–11 or Matthew 24:36–44


Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Catholic Lectionary

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2013 | ADVENT
FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT
YEAR A | ROMAN MISSAL

              First Reading       Isaiah 2:1–5
              Response       Text
              Psalm       Psalm 122:1–9
              Second Reading       Romans 13:11–14
              Gospel Acclamation       Psalm 85:8
              Gospel       Matthew 24:37–44


Catholic Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

December 1
The Calling of Jeremiah, Colossae, and UsJeremiah 1:1–2:37; Colossians 1:1–14
We all have trouble accepting our calling. When God asks us to do His work, we tend to wonder whether we’re able to execute His will. We are not alone in this—the prophet Jeremiah felt the same way.
“And the word of Yahweh came to me, saying, ‘Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you came out from the womb I consecrated you; I appointed you as a prophet to the nations.’ Then I said, ‘Ah, Lord Yahweh! Look, I do not know how to speak, for I am a youth’ ” (Jer. 1:4–6).
Jeremiah had been chosen by God before his birth, and yet he struggles. The issue at the heart of Jeremiah’s hesitancy is doubt about how it will all play out. A simple re-framing of his call creates the reassurance he needs: “ ‘Do not be afraid of them, for I am with you to deliver you,’ declares Yahweh. Then Yahweh stretched out [His] hand and he touched my mouth, and Yahweh said to me, ‘Look, I have put my words in …