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Showing posts from December 26, 2013

Care for Those In Need

Care for Those In Need1 John 3:17 Excerpt ‎While laying down one’s life for another is the supreme example of Christlike love, John moves to a more practical, everyday scenario to emphasize the type of love he describes previously. The adversative conjunction 

Caravan of Semitics (2)

Caravan of Semitics (2)

‎The caravan of Semites is depicted on an Egyptian tomb painting of the 19th century BCE. The added inscription mentions that the Semites delivered eye make-up to Egypt, where it was very popular. The section of the picture shows (on the right) two children in a kind of basket securely tied up and fastened on a donkey. Four women and another child are following behind the donkey. The women’s clothing consists of long, colorful garments. Weapons and various pieces of instruments—perhaps bellows for producing metal—are tied with several ropes to the back of a second donkey. The lyre player following the group carries a water sack over his shoulder. The picture illustrates at least two of the three groups mentioned in Gen 4:20–22: musicians and smiths. ‎Gen 4:20–22

He Lives In Us

He Lives In Us1 John 3:24 Excerpt ‎In this section John provides the believer with certain assurances that accompany being a child of God. With these assurances comes the overwhelming truth that we can stand confidently before God in prayer and rest assured that he will answer our requests. 
Akin, Daniel L. 1, 2, 3 John. Vol. 38. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2001. Print. The New American Commentary.

The Consolation of Israel

The Consolation of IsraelLuke 2:25 Excerpt ‎This refers to the consolation that would be brought about by the inauguration of the messianic age. CompareLuke 2:26, where this consolation is described as “seeing the Lord’s Christ” (cf. also1:54, 68–75). 
For Luke this referred not to the fulfillment of Jewish political hopes involving deliverance from their enemies and restoration of David’s throne but rather to the salvation Jesus brought. This is clear when one compares 2:30 with such verses as19:10. See the discussion at 1:69. Like other devout model believers (Anna, 2:38; Joseph of Arimathea, 23:51; cf. also 12:36; Acts 24:15), 
Simeon was looking forward to Israel’s consolation (2:25), i.e., Jerusalem’s redemption (2:38); the coming of God’s kingdom (23:51); the Master’s return (12:36); the resurrection of the just and the unjust (Acts 24:15).
Stein, Robert H. Luke. Vol. 24. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1992. Print. The New American Commentary.

He Lives In Us

He Lives In Us1 John 3:24 Excerpt ‎In this section John provides the believer with certain assurances that accompany being a child of God. With these assurances comes the overwhelming truth that we can stand confidently before God in prayer and rest assured that he will answer our requests.

Akin, Daniel L.1, 2, 3 John. Vol. 38. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2001. Print. The New American Commentary.

Simeon, Son of Hillel?

Simeon, Son of Hillel?Luke 2:25 Excerpt ‎Many expositors have believed that this Simeon was identical with Simeon (Shimeon) the son of the famous Hillel, and the father of Gamaliel. This Simeon became president of the Sanhedrin in a.d. 13. Strangely enough, the Mishna, which preserves a record of the sayings and works of the great rabbis, passes by this Simeon. The curious silence of the Mishna here was, perhaps, owing to the hatred which this famous teacher incurred because of his belief in Jesus of Nazareth. Such an identification, although interesting, is, however, very precarious, the name Simeon being so very common among the people.
Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. St. Luke. Vol. 1. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

The Jordan at Dan

The Jordan at Dan
‎From the western base of Tell El-Kady bursts forth one of the largest fountains in Syria, and what is said to be the largest single fountain in the world. Its waters form a miniature lake, and then dashing through an oleander thicket and across the plain southward a deep, rapid river. This is called the “lower springs of Jordan.”
On the eastern side of the mound is a smaller fountain, which springs up within the tell and flows off through a break in the rim on the southwest, and foaming down the bank joins its sister. This is the principal source of the Jordan. “Just at this break stands a noble oak and a terebinth, whose branches are hung with votive offerings of all sorts of rubbish, as Israel of old set up their altars under the great trees and in the groves of high places”
The fountain springing from the western side of the mound is supposed to be where the drainage of the southern side of Hermon, pent up between a hard and a soft stratum, seems to have found …

Love and Fear

Love and Fear1 John 4:17-18 Excerpt ‎Love and fear are not compatible. When we experience God’s love for us our whole attitude toward Him is transformed. We still stand in awe of Him, but that awe is without terror or fear of punishment. The more we live in love—and living in love means expressing as well as receiving love—the more confident we become in our relationship with the Lord.
Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Simeon

SimeonLuke 2:25 Excerpt ‎A man in Jerusalem who was righteous and devout and who was looking for ‘the consolation of Israel’ (Lk. 2:25–35). He is not to be identified with Rabbi Simon ben Hillel. He was one of the remnant who were longing for the coming of the Messiah, and had received a direct revelation that he would not die before seeing the Messiah with his own eyes. 
When the presentation of Jesus was about to take place he was guided by the Spirit to come into the Temple. On seeing Jesus he uttered the hymn of praise now known as the *Nunc Dimittis. He saw that the Messiah would vindicate Israel in the eyes of the Gentiles. Simeon went on to speak to the astonished Mary of the role of Christ within Israel. He was to be like a stone causing some to fall and some to rise. He was to be a sign which would not be heeded but spoken against (34). Her own suffering as she watched his life and death was to be acute and he was to reveal the inmost thoughts of men (35). 
Having given his …

Egyptian Chariots with People

Egyptian Chariots with People ‎Two types of chariots used by ancient Egyptians were war and royal chariots. Made mostly of wood and rawhide, these light, horse-drawn chariots could carry two or three people at a time.

Care for Those Indeed

Care for Those Indeed1 John 3:17 Excerpt ‎While laying down one’s life for another is the supreme example of Christlike love, John moves to a more practical, everyday scenario to emphasize the type of love he describes previously. The adversative conjunction “but” (de), absent in the NIV, introduces a negative example that contrasts the positive one of v. 16. 
Clearly, the more difficult call is to lay one’s life down for another. It is a lesser demand to help a brother in need. The apostle knows, however, that not many are required to perform the heroic deed of giving one’s life for another, but the opportunity to help a needy brother is constant. The challenge for John’s hearers is to apply their Christian love to a context that is true to everyday life, one in which they repeatedly find themselves.

Akin, Daniel L. 1, 2, 3 John. Vol. 38. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2001. Print. The New American Commentary.

My Prayer for the Day

Prayer  Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy
Almighty God, I come as usual thanking You for this day. Thank You for those that celebrated Your Son Jesus' man festival of Christmas in worship to him. I pray that Christians and secular people learn that gift giving to each other is not honoring Jesus. However, JESUS is the reason for the season. In Jesus' name I pray. Amen.

Connect the Testaments

December 26
CommunityRomans 12:9–13:7
She might be the one we tend to avoid—the member of small group who always states the obvious or brings up topics unrelated to the discussion at hand. I’m always a bit impatient for her to finish speaking so that others can offer more insightful comments, but generally her comments are followed by only awkward pauses. Or, he’s the person we’re tempting to avoid after church and small group because he always repeats the story about his grand kids that we’ve heard more than just a few times. I hope someone else will be there for him. If I’m feeling extra congenial, I might chat with him—always good to earn some kindness points.
I might approach community this way, but reading Romans 12:9–16 convicts me. The list of instructions on building up the community quickly reveals the selfish bent of my motives. Paul, who has just finished explaining that each member has specific spiritual gifts, shows what living in loving community is supposed to look like: