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Must Be Well Thought of By Outsiders

Must Be Well Thought of By Outsiders Excerpt ‎ Paul’s thought here seems to be that church leaders, as representatives of the congregation, are constantly susceptible to the snares of the devil (cf. 2 Tim. 2:26).
Satan likes nothing better than to disgrace God’s work and God’s people by trapping church leaders in sin before a watching world. It is important therefore that overseers achieve and maintain a good reputation before unbelievers.
Litfin, A. Duane. “1 Timothy.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 737. Print.

Son of Man

Son of Man Excerpt ‎This verse presents an interpretive problem due to the awkward change of addressee in the verse’smiddle. Jesus seemed to be addressing the scribes (v. 10a) but there is an abrupt break in the verse after which He addressed the paralytic. 
Another problem in light of the overall emphasis of Mark is the public use of the title Son of Man by Jesus in the presence of unbelieving hearers so early in His ministry (cf. 9:9; 10:33). Apart from 2:10 and 28, this title does not occur in Mark’s account until after Peter’s confession (8:29). After that it occurs 12 times and is crucial to Jesus’ self-disclosure to His disciples (cf. 8:31, 38; 9:9, 12, 31; 10:33, 45; 13:26; 14:21 [twice], 41, 62; see comments on8:31).
Grassmick, John D. “Mark.”The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 112. Print.

Promises Made to David

Promises Made to DavidIsaiah 55:1-5 Excerpt ‎The “sure mercies of David” (KJV) or promises made to David would culminate in one who would be (1) witness, (2) leader, and (3) commander of the peoples. Once this one had been glorified, he would attract other peoples to his cause (55:4f.).
Smith, James E. The Major Prophets. Joplin, MO: College Press, 1992. Print. Old Testament Survey Series.

Thomas Finds Nathanael

Thomas Finds Nathanael He has no sooner accepted the Lord who found him, than be is eager to communicate the Divine secret to others. It seems widely accepted, though without any positive proof, that this Nathanael was identical with the Bartholomew (Bar Tolmai, son of Ptolemy) of the four lists of apostles, on the following grounds; (1) In ch. 21:2 Nathanael once more appears among the innermost circle of the apostles, and is moreover mentioned there in company with Thomas. In the synoptic Gospels Bartholomew is associated also with Philip, although in Acts, Luke ranks him with Matthew. (2) It is probable that Nathanael was one of the twelve, and, this being so, it is more probable that he should have been identical with Bartholomew than with any other.
Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. St. John. Vol. 1. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

Provoking the Wrath of God

Provoking the Wrath of God Excerpt ‎The rise of this provocation is a hard and impenitent heart; and the ruin of sinners is their walking after such a heart, being led by it. To sin is to walk in the way of the heart; and when that is a hard and impenitent heart (contracted hardness by long custom, besides that which is natural), how desperate must the course needs be! 
The provocation is expressed by treasuring up wrath. Those that go on in a course of sin are treasuring up unto themselves wrath. A treasure denotes abundance. It is a treasure that will be spending to eternity, and yet never exhausted; and yet sinners are still adding to it as to a treasure. Every willful sin adds to the score, and will inflame the reckoning; it brings a branch to their wrath, as some read that (Eze. 8:17), they put the branch to their nose. A treasure denotes secrecy. The treasury or magazine of wrath is the heart of God himself, in which it lies hid, as treasures in some secret place sealed up; see…

‎Tiberias

Tiberias
‎Tiberias. This city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, 212 meters below sea level, was built in the years 17–22 a.d. by Herod Antipas, who named the city after his patron, the Roman Emperor Tiberius. For a few hundred years it became the major Jewish spiritual center in the land, where the Jerusalem Talmud was completed and the six books of Mishnah were compiled. From the 5th century many Christians settled in the city. In 1099 Tiberias was captured by the Crusaders and in 1187 it was destroyed in the war between the Moslems and the Crusaders, after which it remained almost forgotten for some 400 years. In the 18th century the town’s Jewish community started to grow again, until it became the capital of Galilee. Today it is a resort town famous for its hot mineral springs, its beautiful scenery and the many historic sites in the area.

Jews and Gentiles

Jews and Gentiles Excerpt ‎How could Joseph’s Son—the Boy they saw grow up in their town—be the Messiah? Jesus, sensing their opposition (4:23-24), noted two instances in which God’s prophets ministered miraculous acts of grace to Gentiles while Israel was in unbelief—Elijah and the widow of Zarephath (vv. 25-26; cf. 1 Kings 17:8-16), and Elisha and Naaman the Syrian leper (Luke 4:27; cf. 2 Kings 5:1-19). ‎Jesus’ mention of Gentiles rather than Jews having God’s blessing caused the people to be furious (Luke 4:28). They attempted to kill Him, but He walked right through the crowd (v. 30). Luke no doubt described a miraculous escape from the angry crowd. This pattern is seen throughout the rest of Jesus’ ministry: Jesus went to the Jews; they rejected Him; He told of Gentile participation in the kingdom; some Jews wanted to kill Him. But He was not killed until the proper time, when He chose to die (23:46; cf. John 10:15, 17-18).
Martin, John A. “Luke.”The Bible Knowledge Commentary: A…

To Live Quietly

To Live Quietly Excerpt ‎First, his readers should lead a restful life. The word translated quiet (hēsychazein) means quiet in the sense of restfulness (cf. Acts 22:2; 2 Thes. 3:12; 1 Tim. 2:2, 11), rather than quiet as opposed to talkativeness (sigaō; cf. Acts 21:40; 1 Cor. 14:34). The former means “undisturbed, settled, not noisy,” while the latter means “silent.” Paul was telling the Thessalonians to be less frantic, not less exuberant. A person who is constantly on the move is frequently a bother to other people as well as somewhat distracted from his own walk with God. The latter can lead to the former. But a Christian who strives to be at peace with himself and God will be a source of peace to his brethren. Such quietude constitutes a practical demonstration of love for others.
‎Second, Paul recommended minding one’s own business. The connection with love for the brethren is obvious (cf. Prov. 25:17).
‎Third, working with one’s own hands demonstrates love for the brethren becau…

Contrasts and Conflicts

Contrasts and Conflicts Excerpt ‎Instead of passing judgment on the woman, Jesus passed judgment on the judges! No doubt He was indignant at the way they treated the woman. He was also concerned that such hypocrites should condemn another person and not judge themselves. We do not know what He wrote on the dirt floor of the temple. Was He simply reminding them that the Ten Commandments had been originally written “by the finger of God” (Ex. 31:18), and that He is God? Or was He perhaps reminding them of the warning in Jeremiah 17:13?

‎It was required by Jewish Law that the accusers cast the first stones (Deut. 17:7). Jesus was not asking that sinless men judge the woman, for He was the only sinless Person present. If our judges today had to be perfect, judicial benches would be empty. He was referring to the particular sin of the woman, a sin that can be committed in the heart as well as with the body (Matt. 5:27–30). Convicted by their own consciences, the accusers quietly left the …

A Single Stone

A Single Stone
‎The simplest kind of altar consisted of a rock of the right size and shape. Since the Israelites often used human-made altars, these simpler altars were only used in special circumstances, such as when they were away from the tabernacle.

Paul's Ministry to the Churches

Paul's Ministry to the Churches
Excerpt ‎The first aspect of Paul’s ministry involved suffering. Perhaps Paul reflected here on the words of explanation at his conversion experience. God told Ananias that Paul would learn how many things he must suffer for Christ’s sake (Acts 9:16). 
From the beginning of his ministry, Paul and others knew that unique suffering would be his lot. That knowledge came through direct revelation from God.
 Perhaps, further, Paul reflected on the fulfillment of that prediction in the various experiences of suffering in his ministry. Even at the time of writing, Paul was suffering in house arrest for the sake of Gentile churches. In a unique way, the apostle was granted the privilege of suffering for the Messiah.
Melick, Richard R.Philippians, Colossians, Philemon.Vol. 32. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1991. Print. The New American Commentary.

Walking with Jesus

Walking with Jesus
Excerpt ‎In the Bible, “walking” is a frequent figure of behavior or lifestyle. Since Jesus lives in the believer, a person who is living close to Him will have a Christlike lifestyle. Christ loved and gave Himself for us. Anyone who hates his brother is still in darkness. Love for others is one way that Jesus expresses Himself in our lives.
Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

David and Goliath

David and Goliath Excerpt ‎A champion is needed to fight a giant Philistine called Goliath. David volunteers. This should be Saul’s task, as he is a head taller than any of his men — and has one of the few suits of armour! But David goes out to meet Goliath, armed only with faith in the living God — and his shepherd’s sling. This is more than a test of bravery. 
‎It is a brave declaration that the God of Israel is greater than all other gods. As David says: ‎   The whole world will know that there is a God in Israel. All those gathered here      will know that it is not by sword or spear that the Lord saves; for the battle is the    Lord’s (17:46–47).
‎This is God’s war! The lad with faith takes on the giant of fear. Goliath stands for all the pride and power of paganism. David and his sling are so puny that victory can only be an act of God.

Today's Verse of the Day

Today's Verse of the Day is From 1 Samuel 16:7 KJV Translation: But the LORD said unto Samuel, Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; because I have refused him: for the LORD seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the LORD looketh on the heart. NKJV Translation: But the LORD said to Samuel, Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; because I have refused him: for the LORD sees not as man sees; for man looks on the outward appearance, but the LORD looks on the heart. Explore Thomas Nelson's King James Bibles and take your Bible reading further. © Copyright Thomas Nelson Publishers.

My Prayer for the Day

Prayer Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy
Good morning Father. Thank You for this day of grace and mercy. Hallelujah! Bless my and others families, friends and enemies. Keep us Father that You may direct our paths in the pathway of righteousness. May we who know Your Word to evangelize to those that do not know of You and led them to the way of salvation through Christ Jesus. Come. In Jesus' name is my prayer. Amen.

What Kind of Hearer Are You?

January 10
What Kind of Hearer Are You?Matthew 13:1–43
While parables were often told to make truth tangible, in Matt 13, we find that this wasn’t always the case. When His disciples question why He speaks in parables, Jesus quotes the prophet Isaiah: “For the heart of this people has become dull, and with their ears they hear with difficulty, and they have shut their eyes, so that they would not see with their eyes and hear with their ears and understand with their heart and turn, and I would heal them” (Matt 13:15).

This is the case of in parable of the Sower and the Seed. The seed hits the open path, the rocky ground, the thorns, and the good soil, and Jesus describes four hearers who receive the good news in different ways. We should examine this parable and ask ourselves, “What kind of hearer am I?”

Do we seek to really understand the gospel? When we hear it told again and again, does it merely lay on the surface as commonplace? When our faith is put to the test, do we find oursel…

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

January 10
What Kind of Hearer Are You?Matthew 13:1–43
While parables were often told to make truth tangible, in Matt 13, we find that this wasn’t always the case. When His disciples question why He speaks in parables, Jesus quotes the prophet Isaiah: “For the heart of this people has become dull, and with their ears they hear with difficulty, and they have shut their eyes, so that they would not see with their eyes and hear with their ears and understand with their heart and turn, and I would heal them” (Matt 13:15).

This is the case of in parable of the Sower and the Seed. The seed hits the open path, the rocky ground, the thorns, and the good soil, and Jesus describes four hearers who receive the good news in different ways. We should examine this parable and ask ourselves, “What kind of hearer am I?”

Do we seek to really understand the gospel? When we hear it told again and again, does it merely lay on the surface as commonplace? When our faith is put to the test, do we find ours…