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Showing posts from January 18, 2014

Today's Verse of the Day

Today's Verse of the Day is From 1 John 4:18 KJV Translation: There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love. NKJV Translation: There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear: because fear has torment. He that fears is not made perfect in love. Explore Thomas Nelson's King James Bibles and take your Bible reading further. © Copyright Thomas Nelson Publishers.

My Prayer for the Day

Prayer Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy
Father, thank You for this day by Your grace and mercy. Bless those that celebrate Your Sabbath day in the temples and churches. In Jesus' name. Amen.

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

January 18
Giving Up ControlGenesis 30
We are born bent on our own ambitions. It’s in our nature to control and compete. And pride—often the source of this behavior—keenly notices the pride of others. Often, we want to point out the failing of the equally prideful and impose our own wills on them, while neglecting to see these traits in ourselves.

In Genesis 30, we find a myriad of characters who are bent on obtaining favor and selfish gain—often at the expense and exasperation of others. Rachel foolishly demands a son of Jacob (Gen 30:1) and then—because the family dynamics weren’t complicated enough—she has her handmaid bear her a child via Jacob. When she finally obtains a son, she is not joyful—she is triumphant: “With mighty wrestlings I have wrestled with my sister and have prevailed” (Gen 30:8). Leah uses bribery and her own handmaid to gain the attention of her neglectful husband, while Laban and Jacob continue circling, using and manipulating one other (Gen 30:16, 25–36).

Thou…

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

January 18
Giving Up ControlGenesis 30
We are born bent on our own ambitions. It’s in our nature to control and compete. And pride—often the source of this behavior—keenly notices the pride of others. Often, we want to point out the failing of the equally prideful and impose our own wills on them, while neglecting to see these traits in ourselves.

In Genesis 30, we find a myriad of characters who are bent on obtaining favor and selfish gain—often at the expense and exasperation of others. Rachel foolishly demands a son of Jacob (Gen 30:1) and then—because the family dynamics weren’t complicated enough—she has her handmaid bear her a child via Jacob. When she finally obtains a son, she is not joyful—she is triumphant: “With mighty wrestling I have wrestled with my sister and have prevailed” (Gen 30:8). Leah uses bribery and her own handmaid to gain the attention of her neglectful husband, while Laban and Jacob continue circling, using and manipulating one other (Gen 30:16, 25–36).

Thoug…