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The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2013–2014. Ed.

January 26 Lesson 9 SHOWING COMPASSION FOR THE POOR
DEVOTIONAL READING: Luke 19:1–10 BACKGROUND SCRIPTURE: Luke 16
LUKE 16:19–31
KEY VERSE "He that is faithful in that which is least is faithful also in much: and he that is unjust in the least is unjust also in much.—(Luke 16:10)"


LESSON AIMS
After participating in this lesson, each student will be able to: 1.      Retell in his or her own words the account of the rich man and Lazarus. 2.      Explain what today’s text teaches about caring for the poor and about caring for the lost. 3.      Evaluate what his or her church is doing to address the needs of the poor and the lost; plan at least one improvement.


LESSON OUTLINE
Introduction       A.      Relief Efforts       B.      Lesson Background           I.      Rich and Poor (LUKE 16:19–21) A.      Life of Indulgence (v. 19)       B.      Life of Indigence (vv. 20, 21)       The Poor Have Names           II.      Paradise and Torment (LUKE 16:22–26) A.      Same Earthly Outcome (v. 22) …

International Sunday School Lesson

Lesson
January 26, 2014
Showing Compassion for the Poor Luke 16 This treatment of the International Sunday School Lesson is written by Sam E. Stone, former editor of CHRISTIAN STANDARD.______
By Sam E. Stone
The parable we study today follows directly the story that Jesus told about the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-15). J. W. McGarvey suggested, “If the parable of the unjust steward teaches how riches are to be used, this parable sets forth the terrible consequences of a failure to so use them.”
Rich and PoorLuke 16:19-21Luke explains that it was the rich man’s habit to wear costly and well-made clothing. He was literally “making merry brilliantly,” enjoying unprecedented luxury every day. This parable may have been intended especially for the Pharisees, who were lovers of money (v. 14). In contrast to the rich man, Jesus introduced a beggar. This term is used 34 times in the New Testament and is translated “poor” in every verse except here (v. 20) and Galatians 4:9.

The beggar was named Lazaru…

United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 | EPIPHANY
THIRD SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY
YEAR A

Old Testament   Isaiah 9:1–4
       Psalm     Psalm 27:1, 4–9 (UMH 758)
   New Testament   1 Corinthians 1:10–18
Gospel Matthew 4:12–23


Vanderbilt Divinity Library. United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 | EPIPHANY
THIRD SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY
On the same date: St. Titus, Pastor and Confessor

       Old Testament   2 Kings 5:1–15a
     Psalm Psalm 110:1–4
   Epistle  Romans 1:8–17 or Romans 12:16–21
     Gospel Matthew 8:1–13


Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

The Episcopal Church

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 | EPIPHANY
THIRD SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY
YEAR A

PsalmPsalm 139:1–18 or Psalm 139:1–12
             First Reading       Amos 3:1–8
             Second Reading       1 Corinthians 1:10–17
   GospelMatthew 4:12–23


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 | EPIPHANY
THIRD  SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY
YEAR A

   Old Testament   Isaiah 9:1–4
   Psalm   Psalm 27:1, 4–9
   New Testament   1 Corinthians 1:10–18
     Gospel    Matthew 4:12–23


Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

January 26
A Little FollyEcclesiastes 10:1–9; Hebrews 3:1–5:10
Like dead flies in perfumer’s oil, the writer of Ecclesiastes aptly proclaims that a little folly outweighs wisdom and honor. Sometimes fools are elevated to positions of power, while those who are fit for the position are given no influence. The Preacher says, “I have seen slaves on horses, and princes walking on the ground like slaves” (Eccl 10:7).

It’s not difficult to nod our heads and say “Amen” when we come to this example of an “evil under the sun.” We probably all have a story to tell about a leader who wasn’t fit for a position and about the injustices we endured under their authority. When a fool is set up as an authority figure, everyone suffers.

The Preacher gives a suggestion, though: “If the anger of the ruler rises against you, do not leave your place, for calmness will lay great offenses to rest” (Eccl 10:4). This doesn’t just tell us we should have a posture of humility and obedience before bad leaders. We …