Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from July 28, 2014

Paul's Concern for His Own People

Paul's Concern for His Own People

Excerpt

‎It is obvious that, while Paul was writing to these believers in Rome, he at the same time continually displays a great concern for his own wayward people, the people of the nation of Israel. It is clear that he also writes to help them to overcome some of their errant ideas about how a man may become righteous before God. These are ideas which actually are keeping them from receiving the righteousness which God Himselfwould provide. As a result, the reader can observe two elements in the book. The initial theme of the book, which continues to show up throughout the book, is directed through these saints in Rome who have believed. It concerns their own ministry which they should have among the Jews who were depending upon their own devices for salvation. …

Northrup, Bernard E. True Evangelism: Paul’s Presentation of the First Five Steps of the Soul-Winner in Romans. 1997. Print.

Herod the Tethrarch

Herod the Tethrarch

Acts 13:1

Excerpt

‎During Christ’s ministry Rome installed the tetrarch, Herod Antipas (Mt 14:1; Lk 23:5–7) to rule the territory. He was appointed to office when 17 years old. Sepphoris was his first capital, and about a.d. 22 he built Tiberias on the shore of the Sea of Galilee as his new capital, in honor of the emperor.


Elwell, Walter A., and Barry J. Beitzel. Baker encyclopedia of the Bible 1988 : 836. Print.

Definition of Church Administration

Definition of Church Administration

Excerpt

‎Leadership and guidance in deploying the church’s limited resources for ministry are essential if there is to be optimum effectiveness. Leading the church to discover and determine its purpose and objectives is imperative. Identifying the needs of persons and designing and developing the church’s responses to these needs are vital. Relating resources appropriately is crucial. The leadership and guidance required to achieve optimum effectiveness in these facets of ministry are precisely what comprise the field and function of church administration.

‎Church administration is the leadership which equips the church to be the church and to do the work of the church. It is the guidance provided by church leaders as they lead the church to use its spiritual, human, physical, and financial resources to move the church toward reaching its objectives and fulfilling its avowed purpose. It is enabling the children of God who comprise the church to beco…

What Does our Eye See and What Does It Mean?

What Does our Eye See and What Does It Mean?

Authority (Matt. 7:1–14). “Do not judge” are the warning words which mark off the third section of Jesus’ guidelinesfor kingdom seekers. It is directed at those who see in the kingdom the right to exalt themselves above their fellow citizens, who are named “brothers” here.


The first warning dealt with seeking approval of men rather than God. The second warning dealt with having concern for the goods in this world, rather than abandoning such concerns to seek the kingdom and righteousness.  The third warning deals with relationships within the kingdom.

This warning is a vital one; in human society we always go about setting up a “pecking order.” We try to settle the question of who has control or influence over another. The whole “chain of command” approach of the military and the business world reflects the concern human beings feel for authority. The right to judge another is a right which the human heart naturally yearns for.

This is true …

Inscription with the Name Hazael

Inscription with the Name Hazael
‎This small ivory plate was found in Arslan Tash; it has the name Hazael engraved on it. ‎1 Kings 19:15, 19:17; 2 Kings 8:8–29; 9:14–15; 10:32; 12:17–18; 13:3, 13:22–25; Amos 1:4
Laodiceans Were 
Either Hot nor Cold

Excerpt

‎The city was in the southwest of Phrygia, on the river Lycus, not far from Colosse, and lying between it and Philadelphia. It was destroyed by an earthquake, a.d. 62, and rebuilt by its wealthy citizens without the help of the state [Tacitus, Annals, 14.27]. This wealth (arising from the excellence of its wools) led to a self-satisfied, lukewarm state in spiritual things, as Rev 3:17 describes. See on Col 4:16, on the Epistle which is thought to have been written to the Laodicean Church by Paul. The Church in latter times was apparently flourishing; for one of the councils at which the canon of Scripture was determined was held in Laodicea in a.d. 361. Hardly a Christian is now to be found on or near its site.


Jamieson, Robert, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Mat Weavers at Their Lomes

Mat Weavers at Their Lomes ‎ After passing Roshpina, we halted for lunch at noon in sight of the waters of Merom, just above where the marsh of Huleh begins. There is here a Bedouin village, and the occupation of natives is mat-weaving. The rushes grow near by on the banks of the Jordan. Thus the Bedouins of the surrounding country are supplied with the mats which they use to carpet their tents of goats’ hair. In the picture we see a very primitive loom. Some of the rushes are spread on a framework above to shelter the toiler from the heat of the sun, and we see alongside the loom the rushes ready for use in the weaving of the mat. These mats are very thick and heavy and last for many years. One of the women is resting on the framework of the loom as if posing for her picture. In this view we are looking toward the east, and it is the hour of high noon. Some of the finished mats are seen lying beyond the loom. Above are the mountains. The interest which attaches to a desolate region …

4000 Questions & Answers on the Bible, Introduction

Introduction

Excerpt

‎For various reasons it is highly desirable to read the Bible through from Genesis to Revelation. Thus, the Old Testament prepares for the New, a cumulative knowledge of the Bible, so valuable in education, is secured, and a true perspective of religious history and truth is obtained. One who does this reading is prepared to understand and appreciate the myriads of allusions and references to sacred literature contained in secular history, literature, art, law, and life in general.


‎Every person’s life is a success or a wreck, or something between the two, according as he does or does not govern it by the precepts of God’s Holy Word. "The way of the ungodly shall perish, but the path of the just is as a shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day.” The foregoing should prove a powerful incentive to every seeker after truth to read the Bible through. …

Adams, A. Dana. 4000 Questions & Answers on the Bible. Nashville, TN: Broadman & H…

Goliath, The Giant

Your Prayer is Heard

Your Prayer is Heard

Excerpt
‎What was the nature of this prayer? The Greek word (δεήσις) used here implies that some special supplication had been offered, and which the angel tells had been listened to at the throne of grace. The righteous old man had not, as some have thought, been praying for a son,—he had long resigned himself in this private sorrow to the will of his God; but we may well suppose that on that solemn occasion he prayed the unselfish patriotic prayer that the long looked for Messiah would hasten his coming. His name John; the shortened form for Jehochanan, “the grace of Jehovah.” Under various diminutives, such as Jonah, it was a favourite Hebrew name.

Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. St. Luke. Vol. 1. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

Today's Verse of the Day

Today's Verse of the Day is From James 1:3 KJV Translation: Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. NKJV Translation: Knowing this, that the trying of your faith works patience. Explore Thomas Nelson's King James Bibles and take your Bible reading further. © Copyright Thomas Nelson Publishers.

Logos Verse of the Day

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

July 28: I Will Laud Your Deeds
2 Samuel 19:1–43; 2 Peter 3:1–13; Psalm 145:1–21

I grew up in a family of stoics. Through example, my siblings and I were taught to keep our emotions to ourselves. Displays of excessive affection or sorrow were regarded with some suspicion, and this played out in our expressions of faith.
Psalm 145 directly challenges such a mindset. The psalmist expresses why confessing God’s faithfulness is so important, especially to those we influence: “One generation will laud your works to another, and will declare your mighty deeds” (Psa 145:4). God’s mighty deedswere His redemptive acts—especially the exodus from Egypt. His greatness (Psa 145:6), His righteousness(Psa 145:7), His glory, and His power (Psa 145:11, 12) were expressed.

Our praise should be centered on God’s ultimate restorative work through HisSon—an act that has brought us back into intimate communion with Him. We can bring our sorrows and failures to Him: “Yahweh upholds all who are falling, and ra…