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Showing posts from August 16, 2014

His Lot was to Burn Incense

His Lot was to Burn Incense

Excerpt
‎The part assigned to each priest in his week of service was decided by lot. Three were employed at the offering of incense—to remove the ashes of the former service; to bring in and place on the golden altar the pan filled with hot burning coals taken from the altar of burnt offering; and to sprinkle the incense on the hot coals; and, while the smoke of it ascended, to make intercession for the people. This was the most distinguished part of the service (Rev 8:3), and this was what fell to the lot of Zacharias at this time [Lightfoot].

Jamieson, Robert, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Horeb, the Place of Commission and Law

Horeb, the Place of 
Commission and Law

Exodus 3:1-3

‎Interestingly Moses’ communication from God here [Horeb] (3:1-3) is at the same mountain where God later gave him the Law (19:20; 24:13-18; cf. 3:12).


Hannah, John D. “Exodus.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 111. Print.

Spiritual Life for Nathanael

Spiritual Life for Nathanael

Excerpt
“I saw you while you were still under the fig tree before Philip called you.” This is one of the great cryptic statements of the New Testament. For centuries men have tried to decipher the symbolism of the fig tree. In some Scripture passages it is a symbol for peace. In many others it is a symbol for a home. Or it could be taken literally and just mean a fig tree. Exactly what it represents is not terribly important, but we will consider it as a fig tree. What is important is that Nathanael had a religious experience that no one but Jesus knew about. Maybe Nathanael had been reading the story of Jacob’s ladder. Maybe he had been contemplating being baptized by John the Baptist. Maybe he was thinking about the Messiah. Maybe he had prayed that the Messiah would reveal himself to him. The point is, Nathanael had had a spiritual experience under a fig tree and Jesus was saying, “I know about the experience you had that you shared only with God.”Jesu…

God Speaks to Cain

God Speaks to Cain

Excerpt
‎God is here reasoning with Cain, to convince him of the sin and folly of his anger and discontent, and to bring him into a good temper again, that further mischief might be prevented. It is an instance of God’s patience and condescending goodness that he would deal thus tenderly with so bad a man, in so bad an affair. He is not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance. Thus the father of the prodigal argued the case with the elder son (Lu. 15:28, etc.), and God with those Israelites who said, ["The way of the Lord is not equal,"] ... Eze. 18:25.


Henry, Matthew. Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible: Complete and Unabridged in One Volume. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1994. Print.

What's a Sign

What's a Sign

Genesis 3:12

... [a sign is] a significant event, act, or other manifestation that betokens God’s presence or intention. Signs may be miraculous and spectacular, as in the case of those performed by Moses before the people of Israel to demonstrate that God had sent him to them (Exod. 4:1-9, 17, 30) or before Pharaoh for the same purpose (Exod. 7-11). On the other hand, a natural phenomenon such as a rainbow or a sunset may be called a sign (Gen. 9:13; Ps. 65:8), as may an identifying mark such as circumcision (Gen. 17:11) or even a prophet and his children (Isa. 8:18).

Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature. Harper’s Bible dictionary 1985 : 951. Print.

Judgement

Judgement

Excerpt
‎ The Corinthians might have expected that the conclusion of St. Paul’s remarks would be a recognition of their right to sit in judgment on his faithfulness; but it is, on the contrary, an expression of his complete indifference to their shallow and unfair estimate, and an appeal to the approval of his own conscience and to the judgment of the Lord. It is a very small thing; literally, it is for the least. That I should be judged of you; rather, that I should be examined by you (anakrithō). Technically the word anakrisis means “an examination preliminary to trial.” Or of man’s judgment; literally, of man’s day. The brief day of human life is bounded by too narrow an horizon for accurate judgments.


Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. 1 Corinthians. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

The Significance of the Sender

The Significance of the 
Sender

Galantians 1:1

Excerpt
‎The significance of a messenger depended not on his own status, but on the status of the one who sent him. Paul claims the highest status of all, for he was sent “by Jesus Christ and God the Father.” Two prepositions further emphasize Paul’s position. His apostleship is neither from (apo) or through (dia) men. Not “from men” sets Paul apart from the false apostles, who were never commissioned by God at all. Not “through men” sets him with the Twelve, directly commissioned by Jesus.

Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Salvation as Gift

Salvation as Gift

Ephsesians 2:8-9

Excerpt
‎Paul elaborated, And this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God. Much debate has centered around the demonstrative pronoun “this” (touto). Though some think it refers back to “grace” and others to “faith,” neither of these suggestions is really valid because the demonstrative pronoun is neuter whereas “grace” and “faith” are feminine. Also, to refer back to either of these words specifically seems to be redundant. Rather the neuter touto, as is common, refers to the preceding phrase or clause. (In Eph. 1:15 and 3:1 touto, “this,” refers back to the preceding section.) Thus it refers back to the concept of salvation (2:4-8a), whose basis is grace and means is faith. This salvation does not have its source in man (it is “not from yourselves”), but rather, its source is God’s grace for “it is the gift of God.”

Hoehner, Harold W. “Ephesians.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Z…

What is Apologetics

What is Apologetics

Excerpt
‎The word “apologetics” comes from the Greek word apologia, meaning “to offer a defense”—and it’s something the Bible says every Christian is supposed to do. Peter says, “but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect” (1 Pet 3:15). The Greek word for “defense” in that verse is apologia, so, in a broad sense, the Bible is saying we’re all called to be apologists.

‎Jude 3 tells us to “contend for the faith delivered once and for all to the saints,” and 2 Cor 10:5 talks about “… tearing down arguments and all pride that is raised up against the knowledge of God, and taking every thought captive to the obedience of Christ.”

Barry, John D., Michael S. Heiser, et al. Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012. Print.

What Brought Death

What Brought Death

Romans 7:13

Excerpt
‎It was not the Law that brought death to Paul; rather sin used what is good (the Law) to accomplish this. The outcome was that sin’s true nature was revealed (NEB“sin exposed its true character”; JB “but sin, to show itself in its true colors”). Paul is saying that one cannot see how evil sin is until he realizes that sin takes what is good, that is, a divine command, and uses this to bring death to men.

Newman, Barclay Moon, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on Paul’s Letter to the Romans. New York: United Bible Societies, 1973. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Metal Workers

Metal Workers
The picture shows the finishing work on the already shaped metal objects. The surface cleaning (at top) intends to give the vessel an attractive appearance. At the end the vessel is decorated by punching a special decor in the outside of the metal.
‎Prov 25:4; Jer 10:9

Branches of Church History

Branches of Church History

Excerpt
‎The kingdom of Christ, in its principle and aim, is as comprehensive as humanity. It is truly catholic or universal, designed and adapted for all nations and ages, for all the powers of the soul, and all classes of society. It breathes into the mind, the heart, and the will a higher, supernatural life, and consecrates the family, the state, science, literature, art, and commerce to holy ends, till finally God becomes all in all. Even the body, and the whole visible creation, which groans for redemption from its bondage to vanity and for the glorious liberty of the children of God, shall share in this universal transformation; for we look for the resurrection of the body, and for the new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness. But we must not identify the kingdom of God with the visible church or churches, which are only its temporary organs and agencies, more or less inadequate, while the kingdom itself is more comprehensive, and will last for ever. …

General View of "Mosque El Aksa"

General View of "Mosque El Aksa"



Within the sacred inclosure of the ancient temple is the Mosque el Aksa. This mosque stands close to the south wall and near the southwest corner of the haram. About the middle of the sixth century the Emperor Justinian built a magnificent basilica in Jerusalem in honor of the Virgin. The description of the plan and site justifies us in concluding that it was identical with the present Mosque el Aksa. It stands near the beautiful Mosque of Omar. It is 272 feet long, 184 feet wide, covering 50,000 square feet. It has the form of a basilica of seven aisles. The stones in its foundation are immense in size. They were hewn from the mountains and brought from an exceeding height. The historian says: “First they made wagons equal to the size of the rocks, and placed a single stone on each, then forty oxen, chosen by the Emperor’s order for their excellence, drew the stone to the destined spot. It has a Gothic porch of much later date. The arches …

Logos Verse of the Day

Gateway Bible Verse of the Day

2 Corinthians 7:1King James Version

Having therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God.

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Therefore, having these promises, beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God.

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Read all of 2 Corinthians 7

Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.
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English Standard Version

Since we have these promises, beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from every defilement of body and spirit, bringing holiness to completion in the fear of God.

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Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

August 16

No Fear and Full Confidence
Isaiah 33:1–17; Luke 11:37–12:21; Job 8:1–10

Jesus didn’t exactly follow social niceties as a dinner guest. Once again while dining with a Pharisee, He exposed the hypocrisy that was rampant among those religious leaders: “Now you Pharisees cleanse the outside of the cup and of the dish, but your inside is full of greediness and wickedness” (Luke 11:37). The “woes”He followed with challenged His host and, by extension, the Pharisees in general.

His boldness is a trait He wanted to pass on to His disciples: “But nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, and secret that will not be made known” (Luke 12:2). The gospel message will not be kept secret; the new kingdom is coming into being.

Jesus wanted the disciples to be fearless among people because it is God who is in charge, not the Pharisees; they had built up a false construct of authority. And although they may have exercised authority—they could kill and spread fear—they weren’t ultimately in …