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Showing posts from August 19, 2014

Subjection to Christ

Subjection to Christ

Excerpt
‎In the present οἰκουμένη man is not supreme over “all things” in the sense denoted; but in the οἰκουμένη to come “of which we speak,” with its far wider bearings, he is, in the Person of Christ, over “all things” thus supreme. Therefore in Christ alone does man attain his appointed destiny. We may here observe how, even without the enlightenment of Scripture, man’s own consciousness reveals to him an ideal of his position in creation which, in his present state, he does not realize. The strange apparent contradiction between man as he is and man as he feels he should be, between experience and conscience, between the facts and the ideal of humanity, has long been patent to philosophers as well as divines.


Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed.Hebrews. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

Wisdom vs Knowledge

Wisdom vs Knowledge

Proverbs 3:5-7

Excerpt
‎Although this passage certainly condemns any academic arrogance, it does not indulge in anti-intellectualism. The commitment of the heart to God means that all the beliefs and decisions of life are to be submitted to Yahweh. Even very practical decisions are in view here, and not just matters of academic pursuit. But the text is no more opposed to academic research per se than to any normal activity of life. Also, “understanding” implies not just intellectual capacity but one’s own moral standards. One’s private vision of right and wrong must be submitted to God.


Garrett, Duane A. Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs. Vol. 14. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1993. Print. The New American Commentary.

Purposes of His Prayer

Purposes of His Prayer

Philippians 1:12

‎Paul stated two purposes for his prayer. The first is a near purpose: to discern what is best; and the second is a remote one: to be pure and blameless until the day of Christ. The idea of testing is clearly in view in the Greek word dokimazō, translated “discern.” The testing is with a view to approving. The word was used in testing metals and coins, to determine whether they met the specified standards.


Lightner, Robert P. “Philippians.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 650. Print.

The True Worshiper

The True Worshiper

Genesis 22:9-14

Excerpt

‎A true worshiper of God holds nothing back from God but obediently gives Him what He asks, trusting that He will provide. The key idea of the entire passage is summarized in the name Abraham gave to the place: Yahweh Yir’eh, The Lord will provide (or, “see”; v. 14). The explanation is, On the mountain of the Lord it will be provided (or, “seen,” yērā’eh, v. 14; cf. v. 8). This is the basis of a truth often repeated in the Old Testament: the Lord was to be worshiped in His holy mountain by the nation. “Three times a year all the men [of Israel] are to appear [yērā’eh, ­be seen‘] before the Sovereign Lord” to worship Him, bringing their offerings and sacrifices (Ex. 23:17; cf. Deut. 16:16). The Lord would see (rā’âh) the needs of those who came before Him, and would meet their needs. Thus in providing for them He would be “seen.”

Ross, Allen P. “Genesis.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & …

Paul's Greeting

Paul's Greeting

Ephesians 1:2

Excerpt
‎Paul’s extension of grace (charis) and peace is different from the normal Greek letters which had only “greetings” or “greeting” (chairein; e.g., the apocryphal 1 Maccabees 10:18, 25; thousands of ancient papyri letters; and Acts 15:23; 23:26; James 1:1). “Grace” expresses God’s steadfast love toward man and “peace” shows the relational state as a result of that grace. Paul opened his letter to the church at Ephesus with greetings to the believers there, expressing his wish that God’s grace and peace be with them. (See the chart“Paul’s Introductions to His Epistles” at Rom. 1:1-7.)


Hoehner, Harold W. “Ephesians.”The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 615. Print.

The Revelation of Mystery

The Revelation of
Mystery

Ephseians 1:9

Excerpt
‘Mystery’, which appears twenty-one times in Paul’s letters (out of a total of twenty-seven New Testament occurrences), is used in a variety of ways, though the apostle normally employs the term with reference to the revelation of what was previously hidden but has now been disclosed by God (Rom. 16:25–26; 1 Cor. 2:10; Col. 1:26–27; Eph. 3:3, 5). The ‘mystery of God’ (1 Cor. 2:1 v.l.; cf. v. 7) focusses on salvation through the cross of Jesus Christ. It cannot be understood through human wisdom but comes to be known as God reveals it by his Spirit to those who love him (v. 10). The plural ‘mysteries’ can draw attention to the essential elements of the one mystery (1 Cor. 4:1), or anything that transcends human power of comprehending (13:2; cf. 14:2). In Romans 16:25 there is a correlation between the disclosure of the mystery and Paul’s preaching of Jesus Christ. The connection between the mystery and the salvation of Gentiles is a featur…

Logos Verse of the Day

Gateway Bible Verse of the Day

1 John 5:12King James Version

He that hath the Son hath life; and he that hath not the Son of God hath not life.

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Public Domain



New King James Version

He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son ofGod does not have life.

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Read all of 1 John 5

Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.



English Standard Version

Whoever has the Son has life; whoever does not have the Son ofGod does not have life.

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Read all of 1 John 5

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers.



New American Standard Bible

He who has the Son has the life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have the life.

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Read all of 1 John 5

Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation


Holman Christian Standard Bible

The one who has the Son has life. The one who doesn’t have the Son ofGod does not have life.

Insight

InsightThe tabernacle (Num. 9:15) was not only a place of worship, it was intended to be the center of Israel’s national life. This “tent of meeting” also foreshadowed the incarnation of Christ, the living Word who “dwelled” (that is, “tabernacled”) among us in a tent of human flesh (John 1:14).

Mundy's Quote for Today

Mundy's Quote for Today
The tongue is more dangerous than atomic bombs, killing with knifes, guns or poisoning. The latter is because the tongue is a poison that can sprew out poisoinings and love. Once spoken, it cannot return to its owner. It blesses YHWH and cuss' YHWH out of the same mouth. So think rationally before you speak. - Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy 

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

August 19

The Cost of Comfort
Isaiah 39:1–40:31; Luke 14:1–35; Job 9:12–19

“ ‘[You all] comfort; comfort my people,’ says your God. ‘Speak to the heart of Jerusalem, and call to her, that her compulsory labor is fulfilled, that her sin is paid for, that she has received from the hand of Yahweh double for all her sins’ ” (Isa 40:1–2). God directed this command at the prophet and a group of people—possibly all those remaining in Israel. They were to speak comfort to the exiled Israelites, to call them home again.

Sometimes we feel the need for this kind of comfort. Like the prodigal son in the pig sty, we feel exiled and alone; we have paid our sentence, and we want to go home. We’re not even asking for joy—just comfort. Despite their sins, God responded to the Israelites. But God did not merely restore them to their former state. He sent the Suffering Servant, prophesied later in Isaiah (Isa 52:13–53:12), to die on behalf of the people, to pay for the sins that resulted in exile in the fi…