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Showing posts from August 21, 2014

Soundness of Heart

Soundness of Heart

Excerpt
‎God made us to serve him, and enjoy him; but by sin we have made ourselves unfit to serve him, and to enjoy him. We ought, therefore, continually to beseech him, by his Holy Spirit, to give us understanding. The comforts some have in God, should be matter of joy to others. But it is easy to own, that God’s judgments are right, until it comes to be our own case. All supports under affliction must come from mercy and compassion. The mercies of God are tender mercies; the mercies of a father, the compassion of a mother to her son. They come to us when we are not able to go to them. Causeless reproach does not hurt, and should not move us. The psalmist could go on in the way of his duty, and find comfort in it. He valued the good will of saints, and was desirous to keep up his communion with them. Soundness of heart signifies sincerity in dependence on God, and devotedness to him.


Henry, Matthew, and Thomas Scott. Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary. Oak Harbor,…

He Emptied Himself

He Emptied Himself

Philippians 3:7

Excerpt
‎The verb “to empty” is used elsewhere in the Pauline Epistles four times (Rom 4.14; I Cor l:17; 9.15; 2 Cor 9.3), and in each instance it is used metaphorically in the sense of “to bring to nothing,”“to make worthless,” or “to empty of significance.” Context should always determine the meaning; and in the present context the verb refers back to what immediately precedes and its action is explained by the words which immediately follow. Instead of holding onto his privileges, Christ gave up his divine rank by taking on the nature of a servant.


Loh, I-Jin, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on Paul’s Letter to the Philippians. New York: United Bible Societies, 1995. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

God's Words to Moses

God's Words to Moses

Exodus 3:1-10

Excerpt

‎The angel of Yahweh appeared to Moses in flames of fire from within a bush. This is not a visionary or inner experience. What happened there cannot be explained on any naturalistic basis. This was a genuine theophany, a manifestation of God. Moses observed that while the bush was on fire it was not consumed. He moved closer to investigate and when he did he heard the voice of God speak six words:

‎1. A word of address. God called Moses’ name two times. Thus did God arrest the attention of the shepherd and at the same time indicate a personal acquaintance with him.

‎2. A word of warning. Moses must come no closer. He was standing on holy ground in the presence of God. He must show respect for the spot by removing his sandals. Sandals pick up dirt during a journey, and man must be clean when he approaches God!

‎3. A word of identity. The deity identified himself as the God of your father (singular), and the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. …

Prisoners Bridled

Prisoners Bridled

Isaiah 37:29 Prisoners Bridled

Because you rage against me and because your insolence has reached my ears, I will put my hook in your nose and my bit in your mouth, and I will make you return by the way you came.

The Assyrians often led their captives by ropes attached to hooks in their noses.

In 1843, Botta, Paul-Emile French consul and archaeologist, made a momentous discovery of the palace of the Assyrian king Sargon II at Dur Sharrukin (modern Khorsabad), Iraq. Among sculptures discovered in later diggings on the site, were some depicting prisoners who had iron rings thrust through their lower lips. Cords were attached to these rings so that they could be led or held with ease. See 2 Kings 25:7 Prisoners Blinded—Shackles. See also 2 Kings 19:28, and Ezekiel 29:4 and 38:8.

Freeman, James M., and Harold J. Chadwick. Manners & Customs of the Bible. North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers, 1998. Print.

Pronunciation of the Divine Name

Pronunciation of the 
Divine Name

Exodus 3:14

Excerpt

‎The most important name for God in the [OT] is the tetragrammaton YHWH (occurs about 6,800 times), usually pronounced ‘Yahweh,’ though the known pronunciation was lost in the postexilic period. Due to the increasing sanctity attached to the name and the consequent desire to avoid misuse, the title ¯Adonai (Heb., ‘My Great Lord’) was pronounced in place of the tetragrammaton. In written texts the vowels of ¯Adonai were combined with the consonants YHWH to remind readers to pronounce ¯Adonai instead of Yahweh. The incorrect hybrid, ‘Jehovah,’ arose from Christian misunderstanding in the late Middle Ages. The respect for the sanctity of the personal name of God is reflected in modern Judaism.

Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature. Harper’s Bible dictionary 1985 : 685. Print.

Fire as Symbol and Imagery

Fire as Symbol and
Imagery

Exidus 3:2

Excerpt
‎Fire is a common symbol of holiness and in some cases of protection (cf. Zech. 2:5). It represents divine action, with God himself presented as ‘a consuming fire’ (Heb. 12:29; cf. Deut. 4:24). Fire is God’s servant (Ps. 104:4; Heb. 1:7), and his word is like fire (Jer. 23:29). In reference to God’s action, fire is most frequently a symbol of destruction associated with the wrath of God and his jealousy. As a metaphor of God’s holiness, however, it may also purge or purify. The Babylonian exile is described as purification by fire (Ps. 66:12; Isa. 43:2), and certainly the Day of the Lord will purify Israel (Zech. 13:9; cf. 1 Cor. 3:13-15).
‎Fire is a central element of the description of theophany throughout biblical literature. God’s appearance for covenant with Abraham (Gen. 15:17), the appearance in the burning bush (Exod. 3:2), the leading of Israel with the pillar of fire by night (Exod. 13:21-22), and the appearance in fire on Mount Si…

Prayer of Thanksgiving

Prayer of Thanksgiving

Ephesians 1:15-23

Excerpt
‎In the prison prayers of Paul (Eph. 1:15–23; 3:14–21; Phil. 1:9–11; Col. 1:9–12), we discover the blessings he wanted his converts to enjoy. In none of these prayers does Paul request material things. His emphasis is on spiritual perception and real Christian character. He does not ask God to give them what they do not have, but rather prays that God will reveal to them what they already have.


Wiersbe, Warren W. The Bible Exposition Commentary. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996. Print.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem

‎By 34 BC, under King Herod’s rule, ancient Jerusalem went through major redevelopment, crowned with the rebuilding of the Second Temple and a bigger Temple Mount. In AD 66, the Great Jewish Revolt challenged Roman rule over Jerusalem, resulting in the destruction of the temple and the fall of Jerusalem by AD 70.

Mundy's Quote for Today

Mundy's Quote for Today The fire of man burns the flesh and can cause death if acute. The Fire of God does not harm but renews, stirup the soul and talks to you leading you in the paths of righteouness. -  Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy

Logos Verse of the Day

Bible Gateway Verse of the Day

Psalm 42:8King James Version

Yet the Lord will command his lovingkindness in the day time, and in the night his song shall be with me, and my prayer unto the God of my life.

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Public Domain



New King James Version

The Lordwill command His lovingkindness in the daytime, And in the night His song shall be with me— A prayer to the God of my life.

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Read all of Psalm 42

Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.



English Standard Version

By day the Lordcommands his steadfast love, and at night his song is with me, a prayer to the God of my life.

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Read all of Psalm 42

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers.



New American Standard Bible

The Lord will command His lovingkindness in the daytime; And His song will be with me in the night, A prayer to the God of my life.

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Read all of Psalm 42

Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, …

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

August 21

Transitions
Isaiah 42:10–43:28; Luke 16:1–17:10; Job 9:25–35

Life is marked by seasons—times of great difficulty and times of great joy. Usually we focus on making the transition from pain to relief as quickly as possible, but in the process, we may forget the significance of the transition itself. A transition is an opportunity to contemplate: Who is acting to move us from one season of our lives to the next? Why does winter give way to spring

“Sing a new song to Yahweh; praise him from the end of the earth, you who go down to the sea and that which fills it, the coastlands and their inhabitants. Let the desert and its towns lift up their voice, the villages that Kedar inhabits. Let the inhabitants of Sela sing for joy; let them shout loudly from the top of the mountains. Let them give glory to Yahweh and declare his praise in the coastlands” (Isa 42:10–12).

This song of praise moves from the “end of the earth” inward, from region to region, until the whole world is involved. …