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Showing posts from August 22, 2014

The Significance of the Burning Bush

The Significance of the 
Burning Bush

Exodus 3:2

Excerpt

‎The burning bush had a threefold significance. It was a picture of God (Deut. 33:16), for it revealed His glory and power, yet it was not consumed. Moses needed to be reminded of the glory and power of God, for he was about to undertake undertake an impossible task. Second, the bush symbolized Israel going through the fire of affliction, but not consumed. How often nations have tried to exterminate the Jews, yet have failed! Finally, the bush illustrated Moses—a humble shepherd, who with God’s help would become a fire that could not be put out! Note that Moses was brought to the place where he bowed before God and adored Him in wonder, for this is the true beginning of Christian service. Servants who know how to take off their shoes in humility can be used of God to walk in power. Later we see that before God called Isaiah, He revealed His glory (Isa. 6). The memory of the burning bush must have encouraged Moses during many a try…

The Announcement of Jesus

The Announcement of
Jesus

Luke 1:32-33

Excerpt
‎The angel predicted five things about Mary’s Son.
‎1. He will be great.
‎2. He will be called the Son of the Most High (cf. v. 76). The Septuagint often used the term “Most High” (hypsistou) to translate the Hebrew ‘elyôn (cf. v. 76). Mary could not have missed the significance of that terminology. The fact that her Baby was to be called the “Son of theMost High” pointed to His equality with Yahweh. In Semitic thought a son was a “carbon copy” of his father, and the phrase “son of” was often used to refer to one who possessed his “father’s” qualities (e.g., the Heb. trans. “son of wickedness” in Ps. 89:22 [KJV] means a wicked person).
‎3. He will be given the throne of His father David. Jesus, as David’s descendant, will sit on David’s throne when He reigns in the Millennium (2 Sam. 7:16; Ps. 89:3-4, 28-29).
‎4. He will reign over the house of Jacob forever. Jesus’ reign over the nation Israel as her King will begin in the Millennium and c…

Righteous as a Moral Term

Righteous as a Moral
Term

Philippians 3:9

Excerpt

‎In Scripture, righteousness is often a legal term, not a moral one. It means that a judge would pronounce someone righteous. Naturally, the ideal was that the person would actually be righteous, but the focus is on what the judge said. The verdict did not necessarily depend on the moral realities. In accord with that, the primary question of both Judaism and Christianity was “what must a man do if God is to declare that he is in the right and so give judgment in his favour? The Jewish answer was that he must obey the Law of Moses.” For Paul, a righteousness attained by the law was only a relative self-righteousness. The best that could be hoped for was the blamelessness of which he spoke in 3:6b, but which he nonetheless had found inadequate for gaining salvation. Thus, the law provides one approach to righteousness, but it is a flawed approach. The problem is not the law. Paul taught that the law is good (Rom 7). The problem is the sin…

Theophany

Theophany

Exodus 3:2

Excerpt
‎theophany ... [is a] manifestation of God. The [OT] contains a number of narratives of or poetic allusions to God revealing himself to men and women.

Theophanies frequently are associated with particular holy places, representing the foundation legend of a sanctuary (Gen. 12:6-7; 13:18; 18:1; 28:1-17; Exod. 40:34-38) or the call of a prophet within it (Isa. 6:1-8). They tend to follow a literary pattern with Canaanite roots: God appears, frequently as divine warrior or king, surrounded by fire or in splendor (Deut. 33:2; Pss. 18:8; 104:2; Ezek. 1:27-28; Hab. 3:4), and sometimes riding like Baal upon the wind and clouds (Pss. 18:10; 68:33; 104:3); nature trembles (Exod. 19:18;Judg. 5:4-5; Pss. 18:7; 68:8; Hab. 3:6, 10) or the recipient responds with dread (Gen. 15:12; 28:17; Exod. 3:6; Job 42:5-6; Isa. 6:5; Hab. 3:16); and, as a result, nature becomes fertile (Pss. 68:8-10; 104:10-23; Isa. 35:2, 6-7), or God saves and rules (Deut. 33:5; Judges 5; Pss. 18:16…

St. Augustine on Ephesians 5:16

St. Augustine on
Ephesians 5:16

Ephesians 5:16

Excerpt
‎But as concerning these days which we are passing now, the Apostle says, “Redeeming the time, because the days are evil.” Are not these days indeed evil which we spend in this corruptible flesh, in or under so heavy a load of the corruptible body, amid so great temptations, amid so great difficulties, where there is but false pleasure, no security of joy, a tormenting fear, a greedy covetousness, a withering sadness? Lo, what evil days! yet no one is willing to end these same evil days, and hence men earnestly pray God that they may live long. Yet what is it to live long, but to be long tormented? What is it to live long, but to add evil days to evil l days? When boys are growing up, it is as if days are being added to them; whereas they do not know that they are being diminished; and their very reckoning is false. For as we grow in up, the number of our days rather diminishes than increases. Appoint for any man at his birth, for i…

Logos Verse of the Day

Bible Gateway Verse of the Day

Romans 8:32King James Version

He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?

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Public Domain


New King James Version

He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things?

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Read all of Romans 8

Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.


English Standard Version

He who did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, how will he not also with him graciously give us all things?

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Read all of Romans 8

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers.



New American Standard Bible

He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him over for us all, how will He not also with Him freely give us all things?

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Read all of Romans 8

Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by Th…

Mundy's Quote for Today

Mundy's Quote for Today
The flesh can be physically seen; sins of the flesh can be seen physically or from within so deep as the love of it is from the heart. The flesh when a person genuinely accepts Jesus as his or her Lord and Savior after repenting of their sins will no longer live for the flesh, but of the love from the heart for YHWH. Being human and mortal, sin will always rein in the Christian's body, but we have a propitiation, Jesus for our sins. - Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

August 22

Complaints
Isaiah 44:1–45:13; Luke 17:11–18:8; Job 10:1–10

Complaining can be automatic. We complain about the weather, our children, our jobs. And we might do it for any number of reasons—even something as trivial as to keep a conversation going. Although we might complain lightly, we still betray something about our hearts. We assume that we are owed something—that we are entitled.

We might readily admit this. We might freely say that this should not be our posture before people or before God. But Job challenges our stereotype of the complainer. What can we learn from his complaints? In his outcries, we find someone struggling to understand his situation before God. He prays, “My inner self loathes my life; I want to give vent to my complaint; I want to speak out of the bitterness of my inner self. I will say to God, ‘You should not condemn me; let me know why you contend against me’ ” (Job 10:1–2). He repeats and recasts his elevated and prolonged complaints in surprising s…