Criticism of the Judaiziers



Criticism of the 
Judaiziers

Galatians 1:1

Excerpt
‎Judaizing teachers had persuaded the Galatians that Paul had taught them the new religion imperfectly, and at second hand; that the founder of their church himself possessed only a deputed commission, the seal of truth and authority being in the apostles at Jerusalem: moreover, that whatever he might profess among them, he had himself at other times, and in other places, given way to the doctrine of circumcision.


Jamieson, Robert, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Walk Carefully



Walk Carefully

Ephesians 5:15-16

Excerpt

‎The NIV‘s Be very careful, then, how you live is literally, “Look therefore carefully how you walk.” Does the adverb “carefully” (akribōs, lit. “accurately”) modify “look”? If so the first clause in verse 15 could be translated, “Therefore look carefully how you walk.” (This is behind the rendering in the ASV, NASB, and NIV.) Or does “careful” modify “walk”? If so, the idea is, “Therefore look Excerpt".

‎The NIV‘s Be very careful, then, how you live is literally, “Look therefore carefully how you walk.” Does the adverb “carefully” (akribōs, lit. “accurately”) modify “look”? If so the first clause in verse 15 could be translated, “Therefore look carefully how you walk.” (This is behind the rendering in the ASV, NASB, and NIV.) Or does “careful” modify “walk”? If so, the idea is, “Therefore look that you walk carefully” (cf. KJV). This second alternative is preferred because better Greek manuscripts place akribōs closer to the Greek word “walk” and because in the New Testament the Greek imperative “look” (blepete) is never modified by an adverb. Believers then, are to walk (live) carefully, so as to be wise or skillful and thus please the Lord. The manner for this careful, precise walk is making the right use of every opportunity (cf. Col. 4:5), and the reason for this careful walk is that the days are evil. Many are walking in sin, and since the time is short believers must make full use of their time to help turn them from darkness to light. This necessitates wise conduct…

Hoehner, Harold W. Ephesians.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 639. Print.

Paul's Trust



Paul's Trust

Philippians 2:24

‎I trust can also be rendered “I am confident” (NEB NAB). The verb used is a strong one, carrying the components of confidence, reliance, and hope. The ground of this confidence and hope is in the Lord Every mood of Paul’s life is regulated by the will of the Lord. I trust has here the force of “if the Lord wills it” (Brc; cf. 1 Cor 4.19). It is only in the Lord that the apostle can look ahead with confidence, and with this confidence he says I myself will be able to come to you soon, that is, to follow soon after Timothy.


Loh, I-Jin, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on Paul’s Letter to the Philippians. New York: United Bible Societies, 1995. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

"I AM" in Hebrew



"I AM" in Hebrew

Excerpt
‎The verb form used here is אֶהְיֶה (’ehyeh), the Qal imperfect, first person common singular, of the verb הָיָה (haya, “to be”). It forms an excellent paronomasia with the name. So when God used the verb to express his name, he used this form saying, “I am.” When his people refer to him as Yahweh, which is the third person masculine singular form of the same verb, they say he is.” 

Some commentators argue for a future tense translation, “I will be who I will be,” because the verb has an active quality about it, and the Israelites lived in the light of the promises for the future. They argue that I Am would be of little help to the Israelites in bondage. But a translation of “I will be” does not effectively do much more except restrict it to the future. The idea of the verb would certainly indicate that God is not bound by time, and while he is present (I Am) he will always be present, even in the future, and so I Am would embrace that as well (see also Ruth 2:13; Ps 50:21; Hos 1:9


Biblical Studies Press. The NET Bible First Edition; Bible. English. NET Bible.; The NET Bible. Biblical Studies Press, 2006. Print.

Goliath Challenges the Israelites



Goliath Challenges the 
Israelites

Excerpt
‎ How dare you oppose the mighty Philistines?’ ’ Or, “Why should the two armies engage, when the controversy may be sooner decided, with only the expense of one life and the hazard of another?’ ’ (2.) He offers to put the war entirely upon the issue of the duel he proposes: “If your champion kill me, we will be your servants; if I kill him, you shall be ours.’ 


Henry, Matthew. Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible: Complete and Unabridged in One Volume. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1994. Print.

But I Have This Against You



But I Have This Against
You

Excerpt

‎The rebuke given to this church: Nevertheless, I have somewhat against thee, v. 4. Those that have much good in them may have something much amiss in Excerpt.
‎The rebuke given to this church: Nevertheless, I have somewhat against thee, v. 4. Those that have much good in them may have something much amiss in them, and our Lord Jesus, as an impartial Master and Judge, takes notice of both; though he first observes what is good, and is most ready to mention this, yet he also observes what is amiss, and will faithfully reprove them for it. The sin that Christ charged this church with was their decay and declension in holy love and zeal: Thou hast left thy first love; not left and forsaken the object of it, but lost the fervent degree of it that at first appeared. Observe, (1.) The first affections of men towards Christ, and holiness, and heaven, are usually lively and warm. God remembered the love of Israel’s espousals, when she would follow him [wither-soever] he went. (2.) These lively affections will abate and cool if great care be not taken, and diligence used, to preserve them in constant exercise. (3.) Christ is grieved and displeased with his people when he sees them grow remiss…

Henry, Matthew. Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible: Complete and Unabridged in One Volume. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1994. Print.

Mundy's Quote for Today



Mundy's Quote for Today
There is opposition from within a house, but the worse opposition comes from within the house of God--the church. But more dangerous is from the pulpit. That is when I say, "If the head [pastor] is bad, then the body to the doorway is bad". Thus, knowing sin reins with putative respect and condoning is against YHWH commands and precepts. Pray for our church pastors and its body of believers. - Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy

Logos Verse of the Day



Verse of the Day
Logos Verse of the Day

Bible Gateway Verse of the Day

Psalm 94:18-19


King James Version

When I said, My foot slippeth; thy mercy, Lord, held me up. In the multitude of my thoughts within me thy comforts delight my soul.

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Public Domain




New King James Version

If I say, “My foot slips,” Your mercy, Lord, will hold me up. In the multitude of my anxieties within me, Your comforts delight my soul.

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Read all of Psalm 94

Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.



English Standard Version

When I thought, “My foot slips,” your steadfast love, Lord, held me up. When the cares of my heart are many, your consolations cheer my soul.

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The Holy Bible, English Standard Version Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers.



New American Standard Bible

If I should say, “My foot has slipped,” Your lovingkindness, Lord, will hold me up. When my anxious thoughts multiply within me, Your consolations delight my soul.

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Read all of Psalm 94

Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional





August 23

God the Innovator
Isaiah 45:14–47:15; Luke 18:9–19:10; Job 10:11–22

Innovators often say they learn more from their failures than their successes. The successes come as a result of repeated failures, whether in business or in life. We must learn from our mistakes if we are to expect a different, brighter future.
God expects us to learn from our failures—the depths of which we can best understand in comparison to the glory of His successes. God speaks about Himself not only to remind people of His abilities, but also to explain where His authority begins and theirs ends.

In Isaiah 45:1–2, God gave Cyrus a lesson in these boundaries—both by what He said and by what He did not say. Like other kings of the time, Cyrus would have thought himself godlike, but God’s detailed description of what He was about to do left Cyrus with no doubt about who was in charge:

   “And I will give you the treasures of darkness and treasures of secret places      so that you may know that I am Yahweh, the one who calls you by your name,      the God of Israel, for the sake of my servant Jacob, and Israel my chosen one.    And I call you by your name; I give you a name of honor, though you do not      know me(Isa 45:3–4).

From Cyrus’ perspective, he had all authority and could accomplish all things. He did not yet know the Master Innovator who can reverse any situation and honor any person as an instrument in accomplishing His larger plan—to restore His people. God blessed Cyrus with wealth so that it would be easy for him to help God’s people. God exercised authority over the economy to create a new spiritual economy. Cyrus may have pointed to his achievements, but God had enabled them all.

As God created the circumstances for Cyrus to succeed—and for His people to be blessed—He also showed the Israelites His perspective on failure and success. In His power and compassion, He could work in difficult and unexpected ways to bring about their redemption, despite their many failures. The Israelites may have gotten themselves into a horrible situation, but God could make a way to get them out.

What innovations is God making in your life story? In the process, is He teaching you to completely depend on Him?

JOHN D. BARRY


Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.