The Sinner's Surrender to His Preserver

The Sinner's Surrender to His Preserver

Excerpt
‎Job was one of those whom Scripture describes as “perfect,” yet he cried, “I have sinned.” Noah was perfect in his generation, but no drunkard will allow us to forget that he had his fault. Abraham received the command, “Walk before me and be thou perfect,” but he was not absolutely sinless. Zacharias and Elizabeth were blameless, and yet there was enough unbelief in Zacharias to make him dumb for nine months.
‎The doctrine of sinless perfection in the flesh is not of God, and he who makes his boast of possessing such perfection has at once declared his own ignorance of himself and of the law of the Lord. Nothing discovers an evil heart more surely than a glorying in its own goodness. He who proclaims his own praise reveals his own shame. … More
Spurgeon, C. H. “The Sinner’s Surrender to His Preserver.” Sermon Outlines for Evangelistic Services. Ed. Al Bryant. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1992. 14. Print.

The Mosque of Omar

The Mosque of Omar


  • The Mosque of Omar in Jerusalem is located opposite the southern courtyard of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in the Muristan. After the Siege of Jerusalem in 637 by the Rashidun army under the command of Abu Ubaidah ibn al-Jarrah, Patriarch Sophronius refused to surrender except to the Caliph Omar himself. Omar traveled to Jerusalem and accepted the surrender. He then visited the Church of the Holy Sepulchre where Sophronius invited him to pray inside the Church, but Omar declined so as not to set a precedent and thereby endanger the Church's status as a Christian site. Instead he prayed outside in the courtyard, in a place where David was believed to have prayed.

Big-game hunting

Big-game hunting


‎Thes relief dating back to the time of the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal (669-about 630 BCE) shows a big-game hunt. Beaters compel the animals into the nets that are positioned at the edge of the forest. The game animals will get entangled in the net and cannot escape.
Josh 23:13; Job 18:9; Ps 9:15; 25:15; 35:7–8; Prov 7:22; Isa 51:20


Unjust Masters

Unjust Masters

Excerpt
The masters had their faces dead set against these Christian slaves. We can understand that attitude when we remember that these slaves lived lives of singular purity, meekness, honesty, willingness to serve, and obedience in the households of their heathen masters. This was a powerful testimony for the gospel, and brought them under conviction of sin. All this irritated them, and they reacted in a most unpleasant way toward their slaves, whom they would punish without provocation. Yet they did not want to sell these Christian slaves and buy pagan ones, for the Christian slaves served them better. So they just had to make the best of the situation. More
Wuest, Kenneth S. Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997. Print.

Origins of the Samaritans

Origins of the Samaritans

John 4:1-45

Excerpt
Josephus traces their origins to the foreigners (he calls them Cutheans) forcibly brought into the territory of Israel after its defeat by the Assyrians in 722 b.c.e. (2 Kgs. 17). The earliest evidence of the schism between Jew and Samaritan comes from the Persian period. This includes the more ambiguous mention of Samaritans in Ezra 4, which could be a geographical designation of peoples rather than a reference to a religious group. More
Anderson, Robert T. “Samaritans.” Ed. David Noel Freedman, Allen C. Myers, and Astrid B. Beck. Eerdmans dictionary of the Bible 2000 : 1159. Print.

Fresco of Two Akhenaten's Daughters

Fresco of Two Akhenaten's Daughters


Fresco of two of Akhenaten’s daughters demonstrating the extension of Akhenaten’s features to depictions of his family. Courtesy of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

Unlike most genetic anomalies, Marfan’s does not adversely affect intelligence. On the contrary, people with this anomaly are often bright and charismatic. Abraham Lincoln, Rachmaninoff, Niccolo Paganini, and Mary Queen of Scots are among those thought to have had Marfan’s Syndrome. The possibility of adding Akhenaten to this list enhances both the history of this disorder and the understanding of Egyptian history.

Alwyn Burridge
  Brantford, Ontario


Burridge, Alwyn. “Did Akhenaten Suffer from Marfan’s Syndrome?” Biblical Archaeologist: Volume 59 1-4 2001 : 127–128. Print.

Fulfill the Law of Christ

Fulfill the Law of Christ

Excerpt
When Paul exhorts his readers to help carry one another’s burdens, he may have in mind what he has referred to in the previous verse, namely, the act of setting right a wrongdoer in the fellowship. The root of the word translated burdenshowever, refers metaphorically to anything borne, either good (2 Cor 4:17) or bad (Acts 15:28Rev 2:24Gal 5:10). It is possible, therefore, to interpret burdens as a general term, referring to any problems that might befall a Christian.
The position of one another in the Greek is emphatic, meaning that Paul wants to stress it, but what he intends is not completely clear. Two interpretations are possible: (1) he may be harking back to 5:10 and therefore exhorting his readers to put emphasis, not on the burdens of following the Law, but on the burdens of helping each other; or (2) he may be emphasizing the nature of the Christian fellowship, where concern for one another is the basic rule, as he has already expounded it (5:13–14). More
Arichea, Daniel C., and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on Paul’s Letter to the Galatians. New York: United Bible Societies, 1976. Print. UBS Handbook Series

Mundy's Quote for the Day



Mundy's Quote for the Day
Reverend Lynwood F. Mundy

Christ Witnesses to Nicodemus

3 There was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews. This man came to Jesus by night and said to HimRabbi, we know that You are a teacher come from God; for no one can do these signs that You do unless God is with him.”
Jesus answered and said to him, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.”
4 Nicodemus said to Him“How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother’s womb and be born?”
Jesus answered, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. 6 That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. 7 Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You must be born again.’ 8 The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear the sound of it, but cannot tell where it comes from and where it goes. So is everyone who is born of the Spirit.”
9 Nicodemus answered and said to Him“How can these things be?”
10 Jesus answered and said to him, “Are you the teacher of Israel, and do not know these things? 11 Most assuredly, I say to you, We speak what We know and testify what We have seen, and you do not receive Our witness. 12 If I have told you earthly things and you do not believe, how will you believe if I tell you heavenly things? 13 No one has ascended to heaven but He who came down from heaven, that is, the Son of Man who is in heaven. 14 And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 15 that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life. 16 For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. 17 For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved."
18 “He who believes in Him is not condemned; but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. 19 And this is the condemnation, that the light has come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. 20 For everyone practicing evil hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his deeds should be exposed. 21 But he who does the truth comes to the light, that his deeds may be clearly seen, that they have been done in God.”

The New King James Version. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982. Print.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour








January 29

  The living God
        Dan. 6:20

How many times we find this expression in the Scriptures, and yet it is just this very thing that we are so prone to lose sight of! We know it is written the living God; but in our daily life there is scarcely anything we practically so much lose sight of as the fact that God is the LIVING GOD; that He is now whatever He was three or four thousand years since; that He has the same sovereign power, the same saving love toward those who love and serve Him as ever He had, and that He will do for them now what He did for others two, three, four thousand years ago, simply because He is the living God, the unchanging One. Oh, how therefore we should confide in Him, and in our darkest moments never lose sight of the fact that He is still and ever will be the LIVING GOD.

George Mueller


Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening








Morning, January 29      Go To Evening Reading

         “The things which are not seen.”
         — 2 Corinthians 4:18

In our Christian pilgrimage it is well, for the most part, to be looking forward. Forward lies the crown, and onward is the goal. Whether it be for hope, for joy, for consolation, or for the inspiring of our love, the future must, after all, be the grand object of the eye of faith. Looking into the future we see sin cast out, the body of sin and death destroyed, the soul made perfect, and fit to be a partaker of the inheritance of the saints in light. Looking further yet, the believer’s enlightened eye can see death’s river passed, the gloomy stream forded, and the hills of light attained on which standeth the celestial city; he seeth himself enter within the pearly gates, hailed as more than conqueror, crowned by the hand of Christ, embraced in the arms of Jesus, glorified with him, and made to sit together with him on his throne, even as he has overcome and has sat down with the Father on his throne. The thought of this future may well relieve the darkness of the past and the gloom of the present. The joys of heaven will surely compensate for the sorrows of earth. Hush, hush, my doubts! death is but a narrow stream, and thou shalt soon have forded it. Time, how short—eternity, how long! Death, how brief—immortality, how endless! Methinks I even now eat of Eshcol’s clusters, and sip of the well which is within the gate. The road is so, so short! I shall soon be there.

         “When the world my heart is rending
         With its heaviest storm of care,
         My glad thoughts to heaven ascending,
         Find a refuge from despair.
         Faith’s bright vision shall sustain me
         Till life’s pilgrimage is past;
         Fears may vex and troubles pain me,
         I shall reach my home at last.”
___________________________________________________________

Go To Morning Reading                                              Evening, January 29

         “The dove came in to him in the evening.”
         — Genesis 8:11

Blessed be the Lord for another day of mercy, even though I am now weary with its toils. Unto the preserver of men lift I my song of gratitude. The dove found no rest out of the ark, and therefore returned to it; and my soul has learned yet more fully than ever, this day, that there is no satisfaction to be found in earthly things—God alone can give rest to my spirit. As to my business, my possessions, my family, my attainments, these are all well enough in their way, but they cannot fulfil the desires of my immortal nature. “Return unto thy rest, O my soul, for the Lord hath dealt bountifully with thee.” It was at the still hour, when the gates of the day were closing, that with weary wing the dove came back to the master: O Lord, enable me this evening thus to return to Jesus. She could not endure to spend a night hovering over the restless waste, not can I bear to be even for another hour away from Jesus, the rest of my heart, the home of my spirit. She did not merely alight upon the roof of the ark, she “came in to him;” even so would my longing spirit look into the secret of the Lord, pierce to the interior of truth, enter into that which is within the veil, and reach to my Beloved in very deed. To Jesus must I come: short of the nearest and dearest intercourse with him my panting spirit cannot stay. Blessed Lord Jesus, be with me, reveal thyself, and abide with me all night, so that when I awake I may be still with thee. I note that the dove brought in her mouth an olive branch plucked off, the memorial of the past day, and a prophecy of the future. Have I no pleasing record to bring home? No pledge and earnest of lovingkindness yet to come? Yes, my Lord, I present thee my grateful acknowledgments for tender mercies which have been new every morning and fresh every evening; and now, I pray thee, put forth thy hand and take thy dove into thy bosom.


Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings. Complete and unabridged; New modern edition. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2006. Print.

Connect the Testaments

January 29: The New Deal
Genesis 45–46; Hebrews 10; Ecclesiastes 11:5–10

“I pledge you, I pledge myself, to a new deal for the American people.” These words were spoken by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a speech which unveiled a series of economic strategies for ending the Great Depression.

We love newness because it holds hope. The same should be true when we look to the new covenant of Jesus. Although it may not feel quite as new as it did nearly 2,000 years ago—when it altered the spiritual landscape like the New Deal forced economic vitality into America—it still holds the same power today.

This covenant is first mentioned in Hebrews 8; and in Hebrews 10, we see the full implications of it: “For by one offering he has perfected for all time those who are made holy.… Now where there is forgiveness of [sins], there is no longer an offering for sin” (Heb 10:14, 18). Prior to Jesus, there was a need for regular sacrifices for sins to be made, but since Jesus became the ultimate sacrifice for our sins, that is no longer necessary.

I often forget just how radical this “new deal” is. In the midst of being busy, overwhelmed, or stressed, I neglect to acknowledge how much God has done for me. But every day, I live in His grace. Every day, I can be one with Him—no longer worrying about my past and future sins or shortcomings. And that is a day to be thankful for.

Have you thanked God today for the “new deal” He enacted through Jesus’ death and resurrection? What are some ways this gracious act can change or add to your interactions with God?

JOHN D. BARRY


Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.