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Showing posts from February 6, 2015

Source of the Fire

Source of the FireJames 3:6the tongue is only the fuse; the source of the deadly fire is hell itself (lit., “Gehenna,” a place in the Valley of Hinnom south of Jerusalem where human sacrifice had been offered [Jer. 7:31] and where continuous burning of rubbish made it a fit illustration of the lake of fire).More Blue, J. Ronald. “James.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures.Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL:Victor Books, 1985. 828. Print.

"Paradise"

"Paradise" Excerpt Paradise is often used metaphorically to mean any place or condition of pure happiness. Christians normally identify paradise with the Garden of Eden and with heaven, based upon Jesus saying to the thief on the Cross who believed in Him: “I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise” (Luke 23:43), and after His resurrection saying to the churches through the apostle John: “To him who overcomes, I will give the right to eat from the tree of life, which is in the paradise of God” (Revelation 2:7). More Freeman, James M., and Harold J. Chadwick. Manners & Customs of the Bible. North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers, 1998. Print.

The Son Can Set You Free

The Son Can Set You Free Excerpt This general principle, illustrated in the origin of the Jewish people by the parable of Isaac and Ishmael, has one absolute fulfilment. The Son, the true Son, is one. Through Him alone—in Him, in fellowship with Him—can lasting freedom be gained, seeing that He alone is free, and abideth unchangeable for ever. If the Son therefore] The Son and not the Father is represented as giving freedom, in so far as He communicates to others that which is His own. free indeed] The word translated indeed (ὄντως) occurs here only in St John. It appears to express reality in essence from within, as distinguished from reality as seen and known (ἀληθῶςv.311:484:426:147:40). The conception of freedom which is given in this whole passage presents the principle which St Paul applied to the special case of external ordinances. More Westcott, Brooke Foss, and Arthur Westcott, eds. The Gospel according to St. JohnIntroduction and Notes on the Authorized Version. Londo…

The Exegesis of the Letter.

The Exegesis of the Letter.
Excerpt The words “did run” are in the imperfect tense, referring to a continuous action going on in past time. Here, as in 4:12, Paul breaks off his argument to make an appeal to his readers on the basis of their past experience. He uses the figure of a Greek runner. “You were running well.” The word well is from kalos (καλος), suggesting the translation, “You were conducting yourselves bravely, honorably, becomingly.” The word hinder is from enkopto (ἐνκοπτο) which means “to cut in, to make an incision, to hinder.” Inasmuch as Paul is using the figure of a race, this word suggests a breaking into the race course, a cutting in on a runner by another runner, thus slowing up his progress. The Galatian Christians were running the Christian race well, but the Judaizers cut in on them and now were slowing up their progress in their growth in the Christian life. They had deprived the Galatians of the ministry of the Holy Spirit, and the latter had been thrown ba…

Scribes

ScribesActs 4:5 Excerpt Scribes are again presented as influential interpreters of Torah in the NT, though with a decidedly negative portrayal of them. They are usually presented together with other Jewish groups, especially Pharisees (e.g.,Matt. 5:20;23:2). As interpreters of the Torah, the scribes probably would have been most often associated with the Pharisees, who sought to broaden the applicability of the Torah. More Paffenroth, Kim. “Scribes.” Ed. David Noel Freedman, Allen C. Myers, and Astrid B. Beck. Eerdmans dictionary of the Bible2000 : 1173. Print.

Abide

AbideJohn 15:4–79–1016
Excerpt R. Bultmann (John [Eng. tr., 1971] 535 n.1) correctly emphasizes two aspects of μένω ἐν: In reference to humankind “abide in” designates “loyalty”; in reference to the reveler or God it designates “the eternal validity of the divine act of salvation for the believer.”More Balz, Horst Robert, and Gerhard Schneider. Exegetical dictionary of the New Testament 1990– : 408. Print

The Children of God

The Children of God Excerpt The kind of love God demonstrates is active and creative love, which “calls” us the children of God. “Calling” means more than naming. It means the inauguration of a relationship, of a reality that can best be pictured by the metaphor of being God’s own children. By God’s creative act of love, we belong to God as surely and permanently as children belong to their parents. The Elder emphasizes this new relationship when he writes, And that is what we are!and now we are children of God. We do not simply look at a love that is external to us and marvel at its greatness; we know a love that resides within us. As Westcott comments, God’s love is not simply exhibited, it is imparted to us (1966:93). More Thompson, Marianne Meye. 1–3 John. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Mundy's Quote for the Day

Mundy's Quote for the Day Reverend Lynwood F. Mundy
PSALM 33 The Sovereignty of the LORD In Creation and History
The New King James Version. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982. Print.

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 | EPIPHANY
FRIDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK AFTER EPIPHANY
YEAR 1

Psalms (Morning)       Psalm 69:1–21 (22–28) 29–36
Psalms (Evening)       Psalm 73
Old TestamentIsaiah 56:1–8
New TestamentGalatians 5:16–24
 GospelMark 9:2–13


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 | EPIPHANY
FRIDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK AFTER EPIPHANY
YEAR 1

Psalms (Morning)       Psalm 69:1–21 (22–28) 29–36
Psalms (Evening)       Psalm 73
Old TestamentIsaiah 56:1–8
New TestamentGalatians 5:16–24
Gospel       Mark 9:2–13


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 6

  He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk even as he walked
1 John 2:6
The preaching that this world needs most is the sermons in shoes that are walking with Jesus Christ.

Selected

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, February 6                                         Go To Evening Reading

 “Praying always.” 
 — Ephesians 6:18
What multitudes of prayers we have put up from the first moment when we learned to pray. Our first prayer was a prayer for ourselves; we asked that God would have mercy upon us, and blot out our sin. He heard us. But when he had blotted out our sins like a cloud, then we had more prayers for ourselves. We have had to pray for sanctifying grace, for constraining and restraining grace; we have been led to crave for a fresh assurance of faith, for the comfortable application of the promise, for deliverance in the hour of temptation, for help in the time of duty, and for succour in the day of trial. We have been compelled to go to God for our souls, as constant beggars asking for everything. Bear witness, children of God, you have never been able to get anything for your souls elsewhere. All the bread your soul has eaten has come down from heaven, and all the water of whic…

Connect the Testaments

February 6: Student or Scholar?
Exodus 2:14–15:27; John 3:1–21; Song of Solomon 2:4–7

Sometimes we approach God with curiosity, but not with a spirit of humility. We enjoy participating in religious discussions, but forging the link between interpretation and application is difficult for us. We have certain expectations of who He should be for us, but we don’t think about how we should align our lives with Him.

Nicodemus—a Pharisee, a leader of his fellow Jews, and a teacher of Israel—wanted answers from Jesus. He told Him, “we know that you are a teacher who has come from God, for no one is able to perform these signs that you are performing unless God were with him” (John 3:2). Was Jesus a Messiah, like Moses or David, who would restore Israel?

The scholar quickly became a student. Through His answers, Jesus showed Nicodemus that he wasn’t in a place to hold Jesus accountable. Rather, it was the other way around: Nicodemus needed to be challenged and transformed. He was a teacher of …