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Showing posts from February 18, 2015

Ashdod

Ashdod ‎Ashdod was one of the five main Philistine cities besides Ashkelon, Gaza, Ekron and Gath. The drawing shows Ashdod as its reconstruction would have looked like in the 8th century BCE. Until today mainly mud-brick houses were discovered during its excavation. Palaces and temples are still missing. Even though the city seems to have been politically and economically quite important, it was not very different from other cities of the land at that time. ‎Josh 11:22; 13:3; 15:46–47; 1 Sam 5:1–7; 6:17; Neh 4:7; 13:23; Isa 20:1; Jer 25:20; Amos 1:8; 3:9; Zeph 2:4; Zech 9:6; Acts 8:40

Ruins in Beitin/Bethel

Ruins in Beitin/Bethel ‎The biblical Bethel lies beneath the present day village Beitin, which still retains the biblical name. A Byzantine church was built at the outskirts of Beitin, probably in memory of Abraham’s altar at this place near Bethel. The walls of the church are not yet excavated, but they are still partially visible above the surface. On this church ground the crusaders built a tower that is still standing high. ‎Gen 12:8; 13:3

Golden Lamp Stand

Golden Lamp Stand

The Prologue of Hebrews

The Prologue of HebrewsHebrews 1:2 Excerpt As might easily be expected in the Prologue, the writer struck notes which will be crucial to the unfolding of his argument in the body of the epistle. He implied that God’s revelation in the Son has a definitive quality which previous revelation lacked. Moreover the sacrifice for sins which such a One makes must necessarily be greater than other kinds of sacrifices. Finally the Son’s greatness makes preoccupation with angelic dignities entirely unnecessary. Though the Prologue contains no warning—the writer reserved those for later—it carries with it an implicit admonition: This is God’s supremely great Son; hear Him! (cf. 12:25-27)More Hodges, Zane C. “Hebrews.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 781. Print

Need of Endurance

Need of Endurance ταύρων καὶ τράγων] c. 9:12 f.; 19. The sacrifices of the Day of Atonement still suggest the general language. Comp. Ps. 50:13. ἀφαιρεῖν ἁμ] Is. 1:16 ἀφέλετε τὰς πονηρίας ἀπὸ τῶν ψυχῶν (הָסִירוּ). Ex. 34:7, 34:9 ἀφελεῖς σὺ τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἡμῶν (סָלַח). Lev. 10:17 ἵνα ἀφέλητε τὴν ἁμαρτίαν. Num. 14:18 ἀφαιρῶν ἀνομίας καὶ ἀδικίας καὶ ἁμαρτίας. Ecclus. 47:11 κύρ. ἀφεῖλε τὰς ἁμαὐτοῦ. The phrase does not occur elsewhere in the N. T. except in a quotation: Rom. 11:27 ὅταν ἀφέλωμαι ἁμαρτίας (Is. 27:9 LXX.). It is not [unfrequented] in the LXX. The image appears to be that of the removal of a load bound upon the sinner. Compare Jer. 11:15; Zech. 3:4. Contrast v. 11 περιελεῖν, both in form and tense. The limited yet real power of the Levitical sacrifices has been [recognized] in c. 9:13.

Westcott, Brooke Foss, ed. The Epistle to the Hebrews the Greek Text with Notes and Essays. 3d ed. London: Macmillan, 1903. Print. Classic Commentaries on the Greek New Testament.

The Way, the Truth, and the Life

The Way, the Truth, and the LifeJohn 14:6 Excerpt [The word]hodós itself refers to both way and goal. Hence the function of “truth” and “life” is more likely one of elucidation: Jesus is the way as he is the truth and the life. While “life” has an eschatological flavor in John (11:25), these terms serve to effect the redirection to the present that one finds in v. 7, although they do not involve any conflict with what precedes. No direct models have been found for linking the three terms. At most, we read of the way(s) of truth or life in the OT, and the law is separately called way, truth, and life in rabbinic works, though this does not warrant any antithesis of Jesus and the law in this or other passages. The Gnostic idea of the heavenly journey of the soul can hardly have had much influence, for elsewhere in John hodós occurs only in 1:23, there is no reference to the heavenly origin of souls or to their return, the orientation is to the coming again of Jesus rather than the death …

The Value of Adversity

The Value of Adversity
Excerpt It is good for us to have trials and troubles at times, for they often remind us that we are on probation and ought not to hope in any worldly thing. It is good for us sometimes to suffer contradiction, to be misjudged by men even though we do well and mean well. These things help us to be humble and shield us from vainglory. When to all outward appearances men give us no credit, when they do not think well of us, then we are more inclined to seek God Who sees our hearts. Therefore, a man ought to root himself so firmly in God that he will not need the consolations of men. ‎When a man of good will is afflicted, tempted, and tormented by evil thoughts, he realizes clearly that his greatest need is God, without Whom he can do no good. … More Thomas à Kempis. The Imitation of Christ. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, 1996. Print

The Keys of Death and Hades

The Keys of Death and HadesRevelation 1:18 Excerpt ...keys are the symbol of authority, and by having been raised from death, the glorified Christ has the power over death and the world of the dead; he has the power to leave people in death or to open the gates of Hades (see Isa 38.10; Matt 16.18 [RSV footnote]) and let its inhabitants leave. This, of course, is a figure for the power to bring the dead to life. More Bratcher, Robert G., and Howard Hatton. A Handbook on the Revelation to John. New York: United Bible Societies, 1993. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Mummies

Mummies
‎It has been well said that “Egypt is a façade of an immense sepulchre.” During a period of between four and five thousand years the vast population of the Nile valley continued to embalm and secrete their dead, interring them according to the customs of successive epochs. Statues, weapons, amulets, jewels, furniture, food and even written documents on papyrus, leather and linen. According to Egyptian belief, every human being consisted of three distinct parts which during the life time were closely united: First, the body; second, the “sahu” or soul; and third, the “khu,” an emanation of the divine intelligence. At death these elements may be separated but remained intact as to quantity and quality. In due course of time the “sahu” might return to the mummy. The “khu” must undergo a period of purification in the regions of the blessed and finally with the “sahu” be reunited to the dead body which its mummification had preserved from decay. “The valley of the Nile,” says Miss…

Keep Disciples From the Evil One

Keep Disciples From the Evil One Excerpt Jesus’ intercession for the disciples continued with a reminder of (a) their value and (b) their coming danger. They were valuable because they had received the Word of God: I have given them Your Word (cf. “I gave them the words You gave Me,” v. 8). They were in danger because the satanic world system hated them. It hated them because they are not a part ofit. As believers share Jesus Christ, “Everything in the world—the cravings of sinful man, the lust of his eyes, and the boasting of what he has and does” (1 John 2:16) loses its attractiveness. More Blum, Edwin A. “John.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 332. Print.

Greeting and Prayer

Greeting and Prayer By: Sister Shirley Thomas
Good Morning [My Brothers and Sisters], God is listening, so make your supplication genuine and sincere from your hearts.  "My voice You hear in the morning, O Lordin the morning I will direct it to you and I will look up..."(Psalm 5:3) Father, our Father, hear our prayers. We thank You for waking us up this morning; Thank You God for brand new Mercies today; Thank You for your saving grace. Sometimes we just want to say thank You, not asking for anything but, just saying, thank You. We love You; We don't know what today hold for us, but we know who holds today. Thank You Sir. (You continue your prayer to God). In Jesus' name. Amen.

Mundy's Quote for the Day

Mundy's Quote for the Day Reverend Lynwood F. Mundy 35 Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? ... 37 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us. (Romans 8:35, 37 NKJV)

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015 | LENT
ASH WEDNESDAY
YEAR 1

             Invitatory       Psalm 95
Psalms (Morning)       Psalm 32, 143
Psalms (Evening)       Psalm 102, 130
Old Testament Jonah 3:1–4:11
 New Testament Hebrews 12:1–14
 Gospel    Luke 18:9–14


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

Catholic Lectionary

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015 | LENT
ASH WEDNESDAY
YEARS 1 & 2 | ROMAN MISSAL

              First Reading       Joel 2:12–18
              Response       Psalm 51:3a
Psalm       Psalm 51:3–6ab, 12–14, 17
              Second Reading       2 Corinthians 5:20–6:2
Gospel Acclamation       Psalm 95:8
Gospel       Matthew 6:1–6,16–18


Catholic Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary

LENT




WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015 | LENT
ASH WEDNESDAY
YEARS ABC

 Old Testament Joel 2:12–19
 Psalm Psalm 51:1–13 (14–19)
 Epistle2 Corinthians 5:20b–6:10
Gospel  Matthew 6:1–6, 16–21


Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015 | LENT
ASH WEDNESDAY
YEAR 1

             Invitatory       Psalm 95
 Psalms (Morning)       Psalm 32, 143
Psalms (Evening)       Psalm 102, 130
Old TestamentJonah 3:1–4:11
New Testament Hebrews 12:1–14
Gospel Luke 18:9–14


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary

LENT




WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015 | LENT
ASH WEDNESDAY
YEARS ABC

PsalmPsalm 103 or Psalm 103:8–14
             First Reading       Joel 2:1–2, 12–17 or Isaiah 58:1–12
             Second Reading       2 Corinthians 5:20b–6:10
Gospel       Matthew 6:1–6, 16–21


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.