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Showing posts from March 21, 2015

Mundy's Quote for the Day

Mundy's Quote for the Day Reverend Lynwood F. Mundy
5 Thus says the Lord: g“Cursed is the man who trusts in man              And makes hflesh his 2strength, Whose heart departs from the Lord. 6    For he shall be ilike a shrub in the desert, And jshall not see when good comes, But shall inhabit the parched places in the wilderness, kIn a salt land which is not inhabited. 7    “Blessed lis the man who trusts in the Lord, And whose hope is the Lord.[1]

g Ps. 146:3; Is. 30:1, 2; 31:1 h Is. 31:3 2 Lit. arm i Jer. 48:6 j Job 20:17 k Deut. 29:23; Job 39:6 l Ps. 2:12; 34:8; 125:1; 146:5; Prov. 16:20; [Is. 30:18]; Jer. 39:18 [1]The New King James Version. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982. Print.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 21

  He leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake
Ps. 23:3
He always has a purpose in His leading. He knows where the bits of green pasture are, and He would lead His flock to these. The way may be rough, but it is the right way to the pasture. “Paths of righteousness” may not be straight paths; but they are paths that lead somewhere—to the right place. Many desert paths are illusive. They start out clear and plain, but soon they are lost in the sands. They go nowhere. But the paths of righteousness have a goal to which they unerringly lead.

J. R. Miller

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Amazing Grace: 366 Inspiring Hymn Stories for Daily Devotions

March 21


REDEEMED
Fanny J. Crosby, 1820–1915

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; His love endures forever. Let the redeemed of the Lord say this— (Psalm 107:1, 2)

All my theology is reduced to this narrow compass—Christ Jesus came into this world to save sinners.
—Archibald Alexander
The word redeemed implies the idea of a slave standing on the trader’s auction block being offered to the highest bidder. At last the price is paid by a compassionate new owner, who then gives the slave his unconditional freedom. But the freed slave, out of gratitude to his new owner, offers himself as a loving bond servant for life to his redeemer.
Man has been separated from God by sin and has become a slave of Satan. But man has been redeemed. Because Christ paid the ransom we owed to divine justice, we have been freed from the shackles of sin’s bondage and God’s eternal wrath. Out of gratitude for this deliverance, we cling to our new master and lovingly determine to serve Him forever. A realizat…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 21st

Interest or identification?



I have been crucified with Christ. Gal. 2:20.

The imperative need spiritually is to sign the death-warrant of the disposition of sin, to turn all emotional impressions and intellectual beliefs into a moral verdict against the disposition of sin, viz., my claim to my right to myself. Paul says—“I have been crucified with Christ”; he does not say, ‘I have determined to imitate Jesus Christ,’ or, ‘I will endeavour to follow Him,’ but, ‘I have been identified with Him in His death.’ When I come to such a moral decision and act upon it, then all that Christ wrought for me on the Cross is wrought in me. The free committal of myself to God gives the Holy Spirit the chance to impart to me the holiness of Jesus Christ.
“… nevertheless I live …” The individuality remains, but the mainspring, the ruling disposition, is radically altered. The same human body remains, but the old satanic right to myself is destroyed.
“And the life which I now live in the fle…

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening

Morning, March 21      Go To Evening Reading

         “Ye shall be scattered, every man to his own, and shall leave me alone.”
         — John 16:32

Few had fellowship with the sorrows of Gethsemane. The majority of the disciples were not sufficiently advanced in grace to be admitted to behold the mysteries of “the agony.” Occupied with the passover feast at their own houses, they represent the many who live upon the letter, but are mere babes as to the spirit of the gospel. To twelve, nay, to eleven only was the privilege given to enter Gethsemane and see “this great sight.” Out of the eleven, eight were left at a distance; they had fellowship, but not of that intimate sort to which men greatly beloved are admitted. Only three highly favoured ones could approach the veil of our Lord’s mysterious sorrow: within that veil even these must not intrude; a stone’s-cast distance must be left between. He must tread the wine-press alone, and of the people there must be none with him. Peter a…

Connect the Testaments

March 21: Sins of Omission
Numbers 24–25; 1 Corinthians 7:17–40; Psalm 21:1–13

There’s that moment when you’re asked to do something you know is wrong, but you feel like you should respond. It’s almost as fleeting as the decision to not stand up for what is right, even when no one asks for your opinion. Many wrongdoings occur in these moments—these chances for sins of omission. Being silent is as bad as committing the wrong action, which is why the American court system prosecutes all the people committing an armed robbery for murder when only one gunman pulls the trigger.
Balaam, the prophet from Moab, had such an opportunity. After he was asked by Yahweh to bless the people of Israel—in opposition to his own king’s request (Num 22:1–6)—he could have done nothing at all. Or he could have made Yahweh like the gods of Moab—subjecting them to his will instead of their own—but he instead follows the orders of Yahweh and blesses the people of Israel (Num 24:3–9).
The psalmist addresses w…