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Showing posts from June 30, 2015

5:18 The story about the yôḏ from Sarai’s name appears often in rabbinic texts (e.g., b. Sanhedrin 107a–b; p. Sanhedrin 2:6, §2; Gen. Rab. 47:1; Lev. Rab. 19:2).

5:18 The story about the yôḏ from Sarai’s name appears often in rabbinic texts (e.g., b. Sanhedrin 107a–b; p. Sanhedrin 2:6, §2; Gen. Rab. 47:1; Lev. Rab. 19:2).
Likewise, sages declared that when Solomon threatened to uproot a yôḏ from the law, God responded that he would uproot a thousand Solomons rather than a word of his law (p. Sanhedrin 2:6, §2). That nothing will pass away until everything is accomplished means until the consummation of the kingdom, when heaven and earth pass away (Mt 24:34–35; compare Jer 31:35–37;Ps-Philo 11:5; Sib. Or. 3:570–72).

Keener, Craig S. Matthew. Vol. 1. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1997. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Jesus' High View of Scripture

Jesus' High View of Scripture Jesus’ High View of Scripture (5:17–18) Jesus’ view of Scripture did not simply accommodate his culture, a fact that has implications for the view of Scripture Jesus’ followers should hold (J. Wenham 1977:21; D. Wenham 1979). Here Jesus responds to false charges that he and his followers undermine the law. First, when Jesus says that he came not to abolish the Law or the Prophets but to fulfill them, he uses terms that in his culture would have conveyed his faithfulness to the Scriptures (v. 17). Second, Jesus illustrates the eternality of God’s law with a popular story line from contemporary Jewish teachers (5:18). Jesus’ smallest letter (NIV), or “jot” (KJV), undoubtedly refers to the Hebrew letter yôḏ, which Jewish teachers said would not pass from the law. They said that when Sarai’s name was changed to Sarah, the yôḏ removed from her name cried out from one generation to another, protesting its removal from Scripture, until finally, when Moses ch…

Two Coins with the Feast of the Booths

Two Coins with the Feast of the Booths ‎One of the two coins dates back to the time of the First Jewish Revolt (on the right: year 4 = 69/70 CE), the other to the Second Jewish Revolt (on the left: year 3 = 134/5 CE). Both coins show things that are of great importance for the Feast of the Booths: a date palm frond (lulav) and a lemon-like citrus fruit (etrog). ‎1 Macc 10:21; 2 Macc 1:18; 10:6;John 7:2

Begin at the Beginning (John 1:1-18)

Begin at the Beginning (John 1:1-18)John 1:1-18
By beginning at the beginning as he does, John opens a door on the whole creative process. He gets things in perspective. We are not just dealing with certain events in Palestine 2,000 years ago: we are concerned with the purpose of God in history. The meaning of life and the universe is not ‘42’, as the Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy facetiously claims. Understanding is disclosed through the ‘Word’. That is how God displays his nature and how he is known. All this is proclaimed in the opening words of this amazing Gospel.
We perceive and know through our senses: hearing, sight, smell, touch and taste. For John, the basis of perception is the ‘Word’—the mind or ‘essence’ of God. The ‘Word’ is the conveyor of life and meaning. Without the ‘Word’ nothing is understood, and if it is not understood then it might as well not exist (v. 3). The ‘Word’ illuminates and enlivens creation. Constantly available, it is there for those who will re…

Quarreling with God

Quarreling with GodNumbers 20:13Israelites quarreled with the LORD But they had quarreled only with Moses (v. 3). Elsewhere Israel’s quarrel with Moses implies that their real object is God (14:2–4, 11, 27, esp. v. 9).25 Indeed, the next quarrel (21:5) makes this explicit. Moreover, Deuteronomy bears the tradition that the people are responsible for Moses’ punishment (Deut. 1:37; 3:26; 4:21) as does Psalms 106:32–33, “They provoked wrath at the waters of Meribah and Moses suffered on their account, because they rebelled against Him [or “embittered his spirit”] and he spoke rashly.”26 Psalms 95:7–11 bears yet another variant tradition: Israel’s forty years in the wilderness was due to its sin at Massah-Meribah (see Exod. 17:7 and Excursus 50) and not to the scout episode (14:26–35; Deut. 1:34–35). Hence, Moses and Aaron must die with them in the wilderness.27
Milgrom, Jacob. Numbers. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1990. Print. The JPS Torah Commentary.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 30

  Let us not sleep, as do others
1 Thess. 5:6
There are many ways of promoting Christian wakefulness. Among the rest, let me strongly advise Christians to converse together concerning the ways of the Lord. Christian and Hopeful, as they journeyed toward the Celestial City, said to themselves:
“To prevent drowsiness in this place, let us fall into good discourse.”
Christians who isolate themselves and walk alone are very liable to grow drowsy. Hold Christian company, and you will be kept wakeful by it, and refreshed and encouraged to make quicker progress in the road to Heaven.

Spurgeon

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan.

June 30: By Your Example
Esther 8:1–10:3; 3 John 5–15; Psalm 118:17–29

By nature, we are creatures of imitation. Children mimic the traits of their parents, and even in later life we are influenced by the habits of our friends. People naturally imitate, even if they don’t realize it or intend to. This is one reason why “lead by example” is such a powerful principle. It’s also why leaders can change the direction of a whole community—for better or worse (Jas 3:1).

Diotrephes, an ambitious member of the early church who misused his power, was unwilling to heed the advice of John and others who reprimanded him. In his letter to Gaius, a church leader known for his faithfulness and love, John gives this advice regarding Diotrephes: “Dear friend, do not imitate what is evil, but what is good. The one who does good is of God; the one who does evil has not seen God” (3 John 11).

Throughout his letters, John emphasizes that people’s actions reflect their heart. Diotrephes’ actions told a disma…

My Utmost for His Highest

June 30th
Do it now

Agree with thine adversary quickly.Matthew 5:25.

Jesus Christ is laying down this principle—Do what you know you must do, now, and do it quickly; if you do not, the inevitable process will begin to work and you will have to pay to the last farthing in pain and agony and distress. God’s laws are unalterable; there is no escape from them. The teaching of Jesus goes straight to the way we are made up.

To see that my adversary gives me my rights is natural; but Jesus says that it is a matter of eternal and imperative importance to me that I pay my adversary what I owe him. From our Lord’s standpoint it does not matter whether I am defrauded or not; what does matter is that I do not defraud. Am I insisting on my rights, or am I paying what I owe from Jesus Christ’s standpoint?

Do the thing quickly, bring yourself to judgment now. In moral and spiritual matters, you must do it at once; if you do not, the inexorable process will begin to work. God is determined to have Hi…

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest

June 30th
Do it now


Agree with thine adversary quickly. Matthew 5:25.

Jesus Christ is laying down this principle—Do what you know you must do, now, and do it quickly; if you do not, the inevitable process will begin to work and you will have to pay to the last farthing in pain and agony and distress. God’s laws are unalterable; there is no escape from them. The teaching of Jesus goes straight to the way we are made up.

To see that my adversary gives me my rights is natural; but Jesus says that it is a matter of eternal and imperative importance to me that I pay my adversary what I owe him. From our Lord’s standpoint it does not matter whether I am defrauded or not; what does matter is that I do not defraud. Am I insisting on my rights, or am I paying what I owe from Jesus Christ’s standpoint?

Do the thing quickly, bring yourself to judgment now. In moral and spiritual matters, you must do it at once; if you do not, the inexorable process will begin to work. God is determined to have …

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, June 30                                                 Go To Evening Reading

 “And the glory which thou gavest me I have given them.”
         — John 17:22
Behold the superlative liberality of the Lord Jesus, for he hath given us his all. Although a tithe of his possessions would have made a universe of angels rich beyond all thought, yet was he not content until he had given us all that he had. It would have been surprising grace if he had allowed us to eat the crumbs of his bounty beneath the table of his mercy; but he will do nothing by halves, he makes us sit with him and share the feast. Had he given us some small pension from his royal coffers, we should have had cause to love him eternally; but no, he will have his bride as rich as himself, and he will not have a glory or a grace in which she shall not share. He has not been content with less than making us joint-heirs with himself, so that we might have equal possessions. He has emptied all his estate into the coffer…