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Showing posts from October 19, 2015

Bread and Our Physical Needs

Bread and Our Physical Needs The Source of Our Provision When all our needs are met and all is well in our lives, we tend to take the credit for what we have, to feel that we carry our own load. We work hard to earn the money we need to buy food and clothes, pay our rent or mortgage. But even the hardest-working individual owes all he earns to God’s provision. Moses reminded Israel that God “is giving you power to make wealth” (Deut. 8:18). Our life, breath, health, possessions, talents, and opportunities all originate from resources God has created and made available to man. Everything we have is from God: It is He who brings the rain to make things grow, causes the seasons to change, produces the minerals that make the soil fertile, provides the natural resources we use to propel ourselves around, and provides the animals and plants from which we make our clothing and food. Our daily bread—the necessities of physical life—are all from God. God provided for man even before He create…

The Visions of Amos

The Visions of Amos
‎Though expelled from Samaria, Amos continued to proclaim his warnings to its people, speaking through his writings. In the latter portion of his book, he describes vision after vision which came to him, visions in parable, which God interprets to the prophet. He sees a basket of summer-fruit, and knows that the wickedness of Israel is ripe, and the land shall soon be fallen and decayed. He sees the Lord or one of His messengers standing upon an altar, and is bidden break down this temple; for thus, declares God, will He beat down Israel, though He had chosen its people and built them up to be His temple. Amos beholds also a devouring fire come against Israel, and a plumbline measuring its cities for destruction. ‎At the very close, the seer looks beyond the downfall of Israel. Her people shall all be captives of their enemies, yet shall the good be saved, and the land re-peopled. The “tabernacle of David” shall be raised again. “The mountains shall drop sweet win…

Caesarea Promontory Palace

Caesarea Promontory Palace

Standing to Pray

Standing to Pray

Excerpt

The standing posture in prayer was the ancient practice, alike in the Jewish and in the early Christian Church. But of course this conspicuous posture opened the way for the ostentatious. More

Jamieson, Robert, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Vol. 2. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Bethlehem: Christmas Procession

Bethlehem: Christmas Procession
‎Children carrying crosses and icons head the Christmas procession in Bethlehem’s Manger Square. The crossed stripes on their backs symbolize the crossed arms of angels. And they do look like little angels escorting the Messiah on his way.

The Need for Further Moral Changes

The Need for Further Moral Changes

Excerpt

Of all the areas of life that can be ruined by sin, it is sad that the most intimate relationship, the sexual—with all its potential for beauty, joy and fulfillment—is so vulnerable, so easily ruined and so prone to bring public disrepute. It is also unfortunate that pastors and other Christian leaders are susceptible to distortion of the counseling and other close associations characteristic of religious ministry. But there are other circumstances as well to which the tenth commandment, with its prohibition of covetousness, applies. So greed appears along with sexual immorality and other impurity in the instructions of Ephesians 5:3. Whether that greed is for money or for food, or (more likely in this context) for sexual gratification from someone else’s spouse, it is contrary to God’s will and can constitute idolatry (v. 5). More

Liefeld, Walter L. Ephesians. Vol. 10. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1997. Print. The IVP New Testament C…

Wall of Tiberias

Wall of Tiberias
‎In this view we are looking toward the west. The picture was taken on the 8th of May, 1894. This is one of the highest walls remaining in Tiberias, and we see that it is rapidly crumbling. What man has done is going to ruin. Nothing here indicates life and hope but nature, which annually renews itself. And all the memories of Jesus here give no hope for the race He came to redeem. To stand upon the crumbling walls of Tiberias, which were once so formidable, but which have for long centuries been in a sad state of dilapidation; to close one’s eyes upon the ancient ruins, “the relics of a brighter, happier day,” and go back over the centuries to the time “when cities girdled all the smiling lake;” to recall the days when it was the central point of the life and works of our Redeemer—all this is a privilege the experience of which can not be described. Even a vivid imagination fails to paint the charming picture. The narrow strip of unfrequented beach, sometimes recedi…

An Altar of Stones

An Altar of Stones
‎The most common altar in the Old Testament consisted of unworked stone. Built either with clay and stone or out of stone only, these altars often included a flat rock on top (a hearthstone) to make lighting and maintaining a fire easier.

Bunyan’s Divine Emblems

Bunyan’s Divine Emblems

  1. Fish in the Water 2.The Flower 3.The Lord’s Prayer 4.The Vine Tree 5.Over-much niceness 6.Child & Bird 7.Boy & Butterfly 8.Fly at the Candle








A BOOK FOR BOYS AND GIRLS, &c.
DIVINE EMBLEMS, OR TEMPORAL THINGS SPIRITUALIZED, &C.

Bunyan, John. A Book for Boys and Girls. Vol. 3. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2006. Print.

Beersheba four horned altar

Beersheba four horned altar

Alexander the Great on Bucephalus

Alexander the Great on Bucephalus ‎
Bucephalus, one of history’s most famous horses, carries Alexander the Great into the fray in this section of the first-century B.C. Pompeian mosaic depicting the Battle of Issus (333 B.C.) The Roman writer Plutarch recounts how a 13-year old Alexander broke the big-headed horse (“Bucephalus” means “ox head”) after many other men had tried and failed. In Plutarch’s legend, Alexander’s equestrian skills so impressed his father Philip that he declared, “Macedonia is too small for you, son!”
‎Dan 8:5–8, Dan 11:2–4, 1 Macc 1:1, 7, 1 Macc 6:2
‎Image by user Ruthven, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Public Domain

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

October 19

  The Lord set a mark upon Cain
Gen. 4:15
We speak of the mark of Cain as if it was the mark of a curse. In reality it was the mark of God’s mercy, a defense against his enemies.

D. J. Burrell

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

October 19: Big Picture Hope
Ezekiel 38:1–39:24; Revelation 19:1–10;Job 38:12–24

Some Bible passages are so perplexing that we’re not really sure what to make of them. Such is the case with Ezek 38:1–39:24. As we closely examine this text, we can easily lose sight of its message. We can find ourselves so lost in the details that the big picture becomes fuzzy. So what is the big picture presented in this passage? God is on the side of His people; He will fight for them.
This message is comforting. We all experience times when we feel like an ancient Israelite, lost and wandering in the desert. We go through times when we’re not sure what’s next or how it will all end up. But when we realize that God is there to war on our behalf—even in the midst of supreme chaos and paradise interrupted (compare Ezek 37)—our viewpoint quickly shifts.
When we feel as though we’re blindly grasping for answers in the smoke that is the future, startling realizations like the type Ezekiel envisions can prov…

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

October 19th
The unheeded secret


My kingdom is not of this world. John 18:36.

The great enemy to the Lord Jesus Christ in the present day is the conception of practical work that has not come from the New Testament, but from the systems of the world in which endless energy and activities are insisted upon, but no private life with God. The emphasis is put on the wrong thing. Jesus said, “The kingdom of God cometh not with observation; … for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you,”a hidden, obscure thing. An active Christian worker too often lives in the shop window. It is the innermost of the innermost that reveals the power of the life.
We have to get rid of the plague of the spirit of the religious age in which we live. In Our Lord’s life there was none of the press and rush of tremendous activity that we regard so highly, and the disciple is to be as his Master. The central thing about the kingdom of Jesus Christ is a personal relationship to Himself, not public usefulness to m…

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, October 19      Go To Evening Reading
         “Babes in Christ.”           — 1 Corinthians 3:1
Are you mourning, believer, because you are so weak in the divine life: because your faith is so little, your love so feeble? Cheer up, for you have cause for gratitude. Remember that in some things you are equal to the greatest and most full-grown Christian. You are as much bought with blood as he is. You are as much an adopted child of God as any other believer. An infant is as truly a child of its parents as is the full-grown man. You are as completely justified, for your justification is not a thing of degrees: your little faith has made you clean every whit. You have as much right to the precious things of the covenant as the most advanced believers, for your right to covenant mercies lies not in your growth, but in the covenant itself; and your faith in Jesus is not the measure, but the token of your inheritance in him. You are as rich as the richest, if not in enjoyment, ye…