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Showing posts from November 6, 2015

Death

Death
Romans 7:10, 13, 24
New Testament View In the NT, death is seen more as a theological problem than as a personal event. Death goes beyond the simple ending of physical life, which the authors accept almost without difficulty. Death is seen as affecting every part of a person’s life. God alone is immortal, the source of all life in the world (Rom 4:17; 1 Tm 6:16). Only as human beings are properly related to God’s life can they live. But it has been unnatural for people to be in personal communion with the divine source of life since sin was introduced into the world (Rom 5:12, 17–18; 1 Cor 15:22). When Adam separated himself from God, that separation brought death. Each human being has followed in Adam’s footsteps (Rom 3:23; 5:12), bringing death for everyone as the absolutely necessary result (Rom 6:23; Heb 9:27). Death, then, is not merely something that happens to people at the end of their lives; it is also the living out of their lives apart from fellowship with God.
The ex…

Christ is the Chief Shepherd

Christ is the Chief Shepherd
1 Pet. 5:1–5 Trusting His Appointed Leaders
The concept of a faithful Creator (1 Pet. 4:19) is pivotal to 1 Peter 5. As the Creator, God ordained the sufferings of Christ and his future glory (1 Pet. 5:1). Leadership is to be carried out in conformity to that plan. In 1 Pet. 5:1–4 Peter explained the way leaders were to shepherd their congregations. He exhorted the elders to shepherd (that is, feed and care for) the flock of God among them. The imagery of the shepherd and the flock was used by Jesus when instructing Peter (John 21:15–17). Faithful church leaders are promised a reward that they will receive from Christ, the Head Shepherd (1 Pet. 5:4). In 1 Pet. 5:5 Peter quoted Proverbs 3:34 to show the reason for humility. It reaches to the very character of God.

Hughes, Robert B., and J. Carl Laney. Tyndale Concise Bible Commentary. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2001. Print. The Tyndale Reference Library.

“The Tomb of Our Lord,” “New Calvary”

“The Tomb of Our Lord,” “New Calvary”





God’s Judgment of the Whole World, Especially Judah and Jerusalem

God’s Judgmentof the Whole World, Especially Judah and Jerusalem
Zephaniah 1:1
Zephaniah, speaking for God, proclaims a great and worldwide destruction. This will be focused particularly on Judah and her capital Jerusalem.
God will destroy the priests and people who are worshipping the Canaanite god Baal, the god Molech (the Ammonite god Milcom, favoured by some of King Solomon’s wives) and the sun, moon and stars. The priests have been mixing pagan worship with the worship of the Lord. The royal court has been mixing the Hebrew way of life with foreign dress and superstitions. All this has obscured the truth about God and muddied the purity of his people. Zephaniah calls for absolute silence, as God approaches the very moment of judgment.
Zephaniah shows his local knowledge as he describes God striking the areas of Jerusalem where the traders operate and where the smart people live. The self-sufficient merchants and self-satisfied homeowners will find their wealth swept away. Those wh…

Citadel of Cairo

Citadel of Cairo

‎In 88 B.C. Mithradates VI of Pontus massacred about 80,000 Roman and Italian settlers in what is now western Asian Turkey. He soon took Athens from the Romans, installing a ruler named Aristion. Rome forbade subject territories to mint gold coins so Mithradates minted this gold stater, similar to long-familiar Athenian types. It shows Athena (obverse) and her owl with inscription “of Athens, King Mithradates, [and] Aristion” (reverse). In 86 B.C. the Romans counterattacked, executed Aristion, and leveled much of Athens, firmly taking control there. ‎Acts 2:9, Acts 17:15–18:1, 1 Pet 1:1, 2 Macc 6:1, 2 Macc 9:15

Athenian Coin of Aristion and Mithradates

Athenian Coin of Aristion and Mithradates ‎In 88 B.C. Mithradates VI of Pontus massacred about 80,000 Roman and Italian settlers in what is now western Asian Turkey. He soon took Athens from the Romans, installing a ruler named Aristion. Rome forbade subject territories to mint gold coins so Mithradates minted this gold stater, similar to long-familiar Athenian types. It shows Athena (obverse) and her owl with inscription “of Athens, King Mithradates, [and] Aristion” (reverse). In 86 B.C. the Romans counterattacked, executed Aristion, and leveled much of Athens, firmly taking control there. ‎Acts 2:9, Acts 17:15–18:1, 1 Pet 1:1, 2 Macc 6:1, 2 Macc 9:15

Rest

RestHebrews 3:7–11 Rest is not synonymous with inactivity. What God rested from was the work of Creation. He continues constantly to be active, however, in providentially sustaining all that he has created and in the work both of righteous judgment and gracious salvation. Jesus Christ, indeed, in his incarnation, life, death, rising, and glorification, is precisely God in action (2 Cor 5:19). Hence the assertion of Jesus: “My Father is working still, and I am working” (Jn 5:17, RSV). What the Christian will rest from is the struggle against the forces of evil and the afflictions by which this present life is marred. The rest into which the Christian will enter will not be a state of uneventful boredom. God himself is dynamic, not static, and so also is his rest.
Consequently, all that a Christian rests from simply sets him free to be active ceaselessly and joyfully in the service of God, the Creator and Redeemer. In perfect harmony with all God’s works, and in complete fulfillment, C…

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

November 6: The Pursuit of God
1 Kings 8:1–53; Mark 5:21–6:6; Proverbs 2:1–15

We’re willing to put an incredible amount of effort into pursuing something that’s really important to us. Before buying a new gadget, we’ll read reviews, research the manufacturer’s reputation, and consult our tech-savvy friends. Our efforts and curiosity betray the true treasures of our hearts. Other things that we say are important might not receive the same effort—often to our detriment.

In Proverbs, being curious about God’s ways is vital for life. The father in Proverbs encourages his son to be curious about God’s ways, representing his desire to fear God: “My child, if you will receive my sayings, and hide my commands with you, in order to incline your ear toward wisdom, then you shall apply your heart to understanding. For if you cry out for understanding, if you lift your voice for insight, if you seek her like silver and search her out like treasure, then you will understand the fear of Yahweh, and …

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year.

November 6th
Programme of belief


Believest thou this? John 11:26.

Martha believed in the power at the disposal of Jesus Christ; she believed that if He had been present He could have healed her brother. She also believed that Jesus had a peculiar intimacy with God and that whatever He asked of God, God would do; but she needed a closer personal intimacy with Jesus. Martha’s programme of belief had its fulfilment in the future; Jesus led her on until her belief became a personal possession, and then slowly emerged into a particular inheritance—“Yea, Lord, I believe that Thou art the Christ …”

Is there something like that in the Lord’s dealings with you? Is Jesus educating you into a personal intimacy with Himself? Let Him press home His question to you—“Believest thou this?” What is your ordeal of doubt? Have you come, like Martha, to some overwhelming passage in your circumstances where your programme of belief is about to emerge into a personal belief? This can never be until a pers…

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, November 6      Go To Evening Reading
 “I will pour water upon him that is thirsty.”           — Isaiah 44:3
When a believer has fallen into a low, sad state of feeling, he often tries to lift himself out of it by chastening himself with dark and doleful fears. Such is not the way to rise from the dust, but to continue in it. As well chain the eagle’s wing to make it mount, as doubt in order to increase our grace. It is not the law, but the gospel which saves the seeking soul at first; and it is not a legal bondage, but gospel liberty which can restore the fainting believer afterwards. Slavish fear brings not back the backslider to God, but the sweet wooing of love allure him to Jesus’ bosom. Are you this morning thirsting for the living God, and unhappy because you cannot find him to the delight of your heart? Have you lost the joy of religion, and is this your prayer, “Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation”? Are you conscious also that you are barren, like the dry groun…