Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from November 10, 2015

Jesus Quotes the Proverb to the People

Jesus Quotes the Proverb to the People

JESUS REJECTED (Lk. 4: 23–30)
In response, Jesus assaulted their “acceptance” of him: “Jesus said to them, ‘Surely you will quote this proverb to me: “Physician, heal yourself! Do here in your home town what we have heard that you did in Capernaum.”I tell you the truth,’ he continued, ‘no prophet is accepted in his home town’ ” (Lk. 4:23-24). Jesus said exactly what the pious worshipers, the good people of Nazareth, were thinking. “If he’s a prophet, I’m Isaiah! How about a few tricks? It’s not to much to ask of a real prophet. Blind? Poor? Prisoners? Oppressed? Who does he think he is?” The fact is, they already had enough evidence to believe in him—the objective evidence of the miracles in Capernaum Jesus had alluded to. All Galilee, which was only twenty-five by forty miles, was talking about what had happened. Their difficulty in accepting him did not come from the lack of objective evidence. As David Gooding writes:
  It was an irrational—or …

Rameses II., or Rameses the Great

Rameses II., or Rameses the Great
‎What a marvel is the simple fact that Rameses is here before us in full view after all these centuries. Here is the form of a dead king photographed three thousand years after his death. The writer, in the spring of 1887, in Bûlâk Museum, in Cairo, saw this mummy and looked for a long time on the features here photographed. In 1881, near Thebes, in Upper Egypt, a wonderful collection of royal mummies was found. These mummies represent four ancient dynasties, covering a perîod of four hundred years. It was during their time that the Israelites were oppressed in Egypt and were delivered by Moses. The bodies of these kings were identified beyond doubt, and the most important of them is that of Rameses II., or Rameses the Great—the most powerful of all the Pharaohs. He was the third king of the nineteenth dynasty, surpassed by none of the ancient kings of Egypt unless it be by Thothmes III. “the Alexander the Great of Egyptian history,” who lived one hu…

He Was Unable to Speak to Them

He Was Unable to Speak to Them They realized he had seen a vision. Luke did not say how they came to this conclusion, but the implication is that they noted the delay and the muteness of Zechariah and assumed that something must have happened in the sanctuary where God dwelt.
Lk. 1:23 This transition verse explains the return of Zechariah and Elizabeth to their home somewhere in Judah (Lk. 1:39).
Lk. 1:24 For five months remained in seclusion. We know of no custom that would have required Elizabeth to do this. During this period her pregnancy apparently was unknown (cf.Lk. 1:36). Some have suggested that Elizabeth went into seclusion in order to avoid reproach from incredulous neighbors during the time when her pregnancy was not obvious. Luke, however, did not explain why Elizabeth remained in seclusion, but this explains Mary’s ignorance of Elizabeth’s pregnancy in Lk. 1:36.
Lk. 1:25 The Lord has done this for me. In typical Jewish piety praise is addressed to God for what he has done.…

A Painting of Thomas Aquinas

A Painting of Thomas Aquinas
A painting of Thomas Aquinas enthroned between the doctors of the Old and New Testaments.
Other important scholastic theologians such as Bonaventura, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham extended and developed Thomas’s teachings in different directions. None of them could ignore the contribution he had made.
The Seven Sacraments One of the most enduring contributions of scholastic theology was the systematizing of the seven sacraments of medieval Catholicism. Peter Lombard was the first theologian to insist that there were only seven sacraments. Other thinkers such as Hugh of St. Victor and Thomas Aquinas discussed the meaning of these sacraments and their role in the Christian life.
Two of the sacraments were for a restricted group within Christendom: ordination or holy orders for those who were called to a priestly ministry in the church and marriage for those who were wedded as husband and wife. The other five sacraments—baptism, confirmation, the Eucharis…

Persuading Others to Be Reconciled

Persuading Others to Be Reconciled All humans were under sin and merited the just punishment of death (Rom 3:9–18, Rom 3:23; Rom 3:5:12). We can say that one died as a representative of all and brought benefits to all because that one died instead of all.751 It follows that “If ‘one died for all,’ then such a ‘one’ must be uniquely significant.”752 While belief in God today is almost universal, much of the world stumbles over ascribing anything universally significant about Jesus of Nazareth. They may admire his pithy sayings and lament his tragic martyrdom. The lifeblood of the gospel, however, courses from the central truth that in Christ God became one with the human race, that he died for all, and that his resurrection breaks the stranglehold of death.
How many people are covered by the “all”? Texts such as Col 1:20, which speaks of God reconciling “to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross,” and Rom 8…

Reconstruction of the Ark of the Covenant

Reconstruction of the Ark of the Covenant
DISTRIBUTING THE LAND IN VICTORY (JOSH 13:1–21:45) The detailed description of Israel’s inheritance may be tedious to modern readers. For the author it proved the faithfulness of God’s word. The territories given by Moses are listed first (Josh 13) and then the land distributed by Joshua (Josh 14–21). Reconstruction of the ark of the covenant

Lamps, Scissors, and Knife

Lamps, Scissors, and Knife ‎ When Paul had his hair cut in Cenchrea on completion of his vow, the barber probably used a pair of scissors like the Roman artifact in the upper left corner of this photograph. This type of scissors dates back at least until fifteenth-century B.C. Egypt. A pair with the same basic design was found in a fourteenth-century B.C. Amorite stratum in Emar (modern Tell Meskene), Syria. Ancient sheep-shearers also sometimes used shears like this. A Roman invented the first cross-blade scissors in about A.D. 100. ‎Song 4:2, Isa 53:7, Acts 18:18, 1 Cor 11:6
‎Image by Giovanni Dall’Orto, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Free use, attribution required

When Trouble is Near, God is Near

When Trouble is Near, God is Near Supplications with the whole heart are presented only by those who desire God’s salvation, and who love his commandments. Whither should the child go but to his father? Save me from my sins, my corruptions, my temptations, all the hindrances in my way, that I may keep thy testimonies. Christians who enjoy health, should not suffer the early hours of the morning to glide away unimproved. Hope in God’s word encourages us to continue in prayer. It is better to take time from sleep, than not to find time for prayer. We have access to God at all hours; and if our first thoughts in the morning are of God, they will help to keep us in his fear all the day long. Make me lively and cheerful. God knows what we need and what is good for us, and will quicken us. If we are employed in God’s service, we need not fear those who try to set themselves as far as they can out of the reach of the convictions and commands of his law. When trouble is near, God is near. He…

God Protects Us

God Protects Us“Protect them” (John 17:15). God does not remove us from danger but protects us in the midst. We are on a mission in this world in which we live as aliens. Therefore we cannot be taken out of it.
“Sanctify them” (John 17:17). God’s way is not to take us out of the world, but to take the world out of us. The Gk. hagiazo means to set a person apart. Through God’s Word He sets us apart from sin and from evil, that we might glorify Him.
“For those who will believe” (John 17:20). Christ’s prayer was for us as well as the Twelve.

Illustration. Christ is usually portrayed in Gethsemane bowed down in prayer. Here He is best portrayed standing, His commitment made. Triumphant, He looks beyond the Cross to the glory that is to be His when He returns to the Father. Jesus also prays for His disciples and for us.
One as We are one” (John 17:22–23). This verse has been misused to promote the idea that Christ prayed for the organizational union of modern Christian denominations. Instead,…

Fulfill the Law of Christ

Fulfill the Law of Christ

Galatians 6:2
When Paul exhorts his readers to help carry one another’s burdens, he may have in mind what he has referred to in the previous verse, namely, the act of setting right a wrongdoer in the fellowship. The root of the word translated burdens, however, refers metaphorically to anything borne, either good (2 Cor 4:17) or bad (Acts 15:28; Rev 2:24; Gal 5:10). It is possible, therefore, to interpret burdens as a general term, referring to any problems that might befall a Christian.
The position of one another in the Greek is emphatic, meaning that Paul wants to stress it, but what he intends is not completely clear. Two interpretations are possible: (1) he may be harking back to Galatians 5:10 and therefore exhorting his readers to put emphasis, not on the burdens of following the Law, but on the burdens of helping each other; or (2) he may be emphasizing the nature of the Christian fellowship, where concern for one another is the basic rule, as he has …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

November 10

  A daily rate for every day
2 Kings 25:30
The acts of breathing which I performed yesterday will not keep me alive today; I must continue to breathe afresh every moment, or animal life ceases. In like manner yesterday’s grace and spiritual strength must be renewed, and the Holy Spirit must continue to breathe on my soul from moment to moment in order to my enjoying the consolations, and to my working the works of God.

Toplady

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments

November 10: Take Up Your Cross
1 Kings 13:1–34; Mark 8:11–9:1; Proverbs 3:13–22

The way we respond to desperate circumstances often clarifies what gives us hope. Jesus’ followers faced the very real threat of death by choosing to follow Him—something He warns them about: “And summoning the crowd together with his disciples, he said to them, ‘If anyone wants to come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life on account of me and of the gospel will save it’ ” (Mark 8:34–35).

In Jesus’ time, “taking up the cross” would have been associated with a shameful death at the hands of the ruling Roman powers. To risk suffering this type of shameful death required more than lukewarm commitment.

Jesus doesn’t limit this calling to His disciples; anyone who “wants to come after” faces this uncertainty and must hold a faith that displays this loyalty. For some Christians today, following Jesus means …

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

November 10: Take Up Your Cross
1 Kings 13:1–34; Mark 8:11–9:1;Proverbs 3:13–22

The way we respond to desperate circumstances often clarifies what gives us hope. Jesus’ followers faced the very real threat of death by choosing to follow Him—something He warns them about: “And summoning the crowd together with his disciples, he said to them, ‘If anyone wants to come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life on account of me and of the gospel will save it’ ” (Mark 8:34–35).

In Jesus’ time, “taking up the cross” would have been associated with a shameful death at the hands of the ruling Roman powers. To risk suffering this type of shameful death required more than lukewarm commitment.

Jesus doesn’t limit this calling to His disciples; anyone who “wants to come after” faces this uncertainty and must hold a faith that displays this loyalty. For some Christians today, following Jesus means o…

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, November 10      Go To Evening Reading
 “The eternal God is thy refuge.” — Deuteronomy 33:27
The word refuge may be translated “mansion,” or “abiding- place,” which gives the thought that God is our abode, our home. There is a fulness and sweetness in the metaphor, for dear to our hearts is our home, although it be the humblest cottage, or the scantiest garret; and dearer far is our blessed God, in whom we live, and move, and have our being. It is at home that we feel safe: we shut the world out and dwell in quiet security. So when we are with our God we “fear no evil.” He is our shelter and retreat, our abiding refuge. At home, we take our rest; it is there we find repose after the fatigue and toil of the day. And so our hearts find rest in God, when, wearied with life’s conflict, we turn to him, and our soul dwells at ease. At home, also, we let our hearts loose; we are not afraid of being misunderstood, nor of our words being misconstrued. So when we are with God we can com…