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Showing posts from December 22, 2015

He Wanted to Justify Himself

He Wanted to Justify Himself
Excerpt


The expert in O.T.Law had a clear grasp of the Law’s central requirements. But he was also aware that he fell short of fulfilling them. There are only three ways a person can react when that awareness dawns: (1) We can acknowledge we are sinners and appeal to God for mercy. (2) We can concentrate on the things we do well and pretend we do not fail in others. (3) We can cut the Law’s requirements down by reinterpreting them, so we can live up to what are essentially lower standards. It’s this third approach the expert in Law took. He wanted to define “neighbor” in such a way he could claim he had kept the commandment.


Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Romans

Romans

The Israelite Encampment

The Israelite Encampment ‎The Book of Numbers describes the layout of the encampment during Israel’s 40 years of wilderness wanderings (2:1–34). The tribes encamped around the tabernacle, both in order to stay close to the tent of meeting and to defend it during attack. The four sides were surrounded by four groups, led by Judah, Reuben, Ephraim, and Dan. The Levites—specially chosen to be close to God—camped around all sides of the tabernacle.

Job’s Character

Job’s Character
Job 1:1 Job’s character is described by the use of two pairs of qualities: blameless and upright, and one who feared God and turned away from evil. The first pair depicts Job as a morally good man, and the second pair as a religious person. The first word is translated in the King James Version (KJV) as “perfect,” which suggests a state of sinlessness. The idea is more exactly one of “moral integrity.” Upright translates a word having to do with “straightness” and again focuses upon Job’s honesty in his dealings. This first pair of terms in Hebrew is found in Psalm 25:21, translated by RSV as “integrity and uprightness,” and by TEV as “goodness and honesty”; in Psalm 37:37 they occur in parallel. In many languages the first pair of descriptions used of Job are rendered idiomatically; for example, “having one heart” or “speaking with one mouth.” Also common are terms for straightness, “going on the straight road,” and confidence, “man on whose word people rest.”
Feared …

Troubled Hearts

Troubled Hearts
John 14:1–2
14:5–6. Thomas’ statement (We don’t know where You are going) and his question (So how can we know the way?) reflected the perplexity of the Eleven (cf. Peter’s similar question; 13:36). They would remain puzzled until His death and resurrection and until the advent of the Spirit. They had all the information but they could not put it together.
Jesus’ words, I am the Way and the Truth and the Life, are the sixth of Jesus’ seven “I am” statements in the Gospel ofJohn (6:48; 8:12; 10:9, 11; 11:25; 14:6; 15:1). Jesus is the “Way”because He is the “Truth”and the“Life.” As the Father is Truth and Life, Jesus is the embodiment of God so people can come to the Father (cf. 1:4, 14, 18; 11:25). By His words, No one comes to the Father except through Me, Jesus stressed that salvation, contrary to what many people think, is not obtainable through many ways. Only oneWay exists (cf. Acts 4:12; 1 Tim. 2:5). Jesus is the only access to the Father because He isthe onlyOne fr…