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Showing posts from January 20, 2016

Pre-Flood Culture

Pre-Flood Culture
Excerpt


Pre-flood culture had undergone a thorough demonization. Fallen angels (demons) had taken over the souls and bodies of men and through marriage had produced Nephilim (fallen ones) who became the violent “mighty men who were of old, men of renown” (Ge. 6:4). Marriage had been demonized, and violence was idolized. Sexual violence was de jure. Therefore God decided to wipe the world clean of every trace of humanity, except for the man Noah.


Hughes, R. Kent. Genesis: Beginning and Blessing. Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2004. Print. Preaching the Word.

All Authority

All Authority
Matthew 28:18
Excerpt


When Jesus claimed “all authority in heaven and on earth,”He meant that there is no one or thing with power to limit His freedom of action (cf. Matthew 8). It is significant that this affirmation is linked with the command that we “go” and make disciples of all nations.


Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Who Saw and Called Moses?

Who Saw and Called Moses?
Exodus 3:4
Excerpt


A literal translation of both Lord and God is confusing, for it suggests that the one who saw was not the one who called. This is a literary seam, where two different traditions have been joined together, one tradition using the sacred name YWHA (Lord) and the other using the usual word for deity, ’Elohim (God). The confusion is easily avoided by using the pronoun in place of God, as in Ex. 3:4TEV: “When the Lord saw … he called.” Ex. 3:4TEV transfers the use of “God” to Ex. 3:5, where it fits more naturally in place of the pronoun “he.”

This confusion about the participants is increased with the reference to “the angel” in 3:2a. As explained above, the clause in 3:2a should be understood as a summary or preview statement, with the details of how it happened then listed in sequence. Only one participant in dialogue with Moses is intended throughout the narrative; he is called the Lord, God, and “the angel,” depending on the perspective of the …

Eternal Life

Eternal Life
John 3:16
Excerpt


The phrase eternal life comes from a Hebrew phrase, literally “life in the (coming) age.” For the Hebrews “the coming age” was the age in which God would destroy the power of sin and evil in the world and set up his own rule of love and peace. In the earliest notions of this coming age, it was probably not looked upon as something that would never end; it was not “eternal” in our sense of the word. However, there is no doubt that by New Testament times “life in the age” was looked upon by many Jews as an everlasting experience. In the New Testament it definitely has this meaning, even though the main emphasis is always on the quality of life one experiences when God rules his life. That is, in the Gospel of John eternal life is basically qualitative, but it is also conceived of as life that never ends, because it comes from God.


Newman, Barclay Moon, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on the Gospel of John. New York: United Bible Societies, 1993. Print. UBS…

Love God, Obey His Commandments

Love God, Obey His Commandments
Excerpt


John is not talking about how we know others have a vital relationship with God. He is discussing how a real faith in Jesus expresses itself in our lives. As we experience love for others and for God, and find ourselves choosing to obey His commandments, we realize that we truly have been born again.

Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Jesus Alone: The Messiah’s Temptation

Jesus Alone: The Messiah’s Temptation Excerpt
It is no coincidence that Jesus’ temptation immediately follows his baptism. Many of God’s people have had similar experiences. Right after conversion or some other significant spiritual event, precisely when a certain level of victory or maturity seems to have been attained, temptations resume more strongly than ever (cf. Elijah in 1 Kgs 19:1–18 and Paul in Rom 7:14–25). 
Blomberg, Craig. Matthew. Vol. 22. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1992. Print. The New American Commentary.

The True Nature of Love

The True Nature of Love

1 John 4:7–9

Excerpt


God has loved us in a way that has given us life. The atoning death of Jesus provides the means by which believers come into a life-giving realm where love is received and expressed (Jn 3:16). We do not simply gaze at the painting on the wall; we are touched by the hand of God and given life-giving love. And, third, because life and love come from God, it is God’s activity and not our own behavior and efforts that defines the essence of love.


Thompson, Marianne Meye. 1–3 John. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

January 20

  My voice shalt thou hear in the morning, O Lord; in the morning will I direct My prayer unto thee, and will look up
Ps. 5:3
The morning is the gate of the day, and should be well guarded with prayer. It is one end of the thread on which the day’s actions are strung, and should be well knotted with devotion. If we felt more the majesty of life we should be more careful of its mornings. He who rushes from his bed to his business and waiteth not to worship is as foolish as though he had not put on his clothes, or cleansed his face, and as unwise as though he dashed into battle without arms or armor. Be it ours to bathe in the softly flowing river of communion with God, before the heat of the wilderness and the burden of the way begin to oppress us.

Spurgeon

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

January 20: While You Are Waiting
Genesis 32–33; Matthew 24:29–25:13;Ecclesiastes 7:22–29

Jesus’ instructions to His disciples about His return have inspired many to incorrectly predict His second coming. But if we read His parables, we find that they’re not so focused on the future. Jesus prepares His disciples for His absence, and for the end times, because He wants them to be hopeful, expecting His return. He wants them to be ready and watchful. But He wants them to do all of these things by being fully engaged in the present, readying His kingdom.

Jesus’ parable of the Wise and Wicked Servants demonstrates this attitude. While the faithful and wise servant provides for the master’s household during his absence, the wicked servant uses the time flippantly: carousing and beating his fellow servants. When the master returns, the faithful servant is promoted for his service, and the wicked servant is punished. The parable presses the disciples to use their time wisely during Jesus’ absen…

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

January 20th
Are you fresh for everything?


Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.John 3:3.

Sometimes we are fresh for a prayer meeting but not fresh for cleaning boots!
Being born again of the Spirit is an unmistakable work of God, as mysterious as the wind, as surprising as God Himself. We do not know where it begins, it is hidden away in the depths of our personal life. Being born again from above is a perennial, perpetual and eternal beginning, a freshness all the time in thinking and in talking and in living, the continual surprise of the life of God. Staleness is an indication of something out of joint with God—‘I must do this thing or it will never be done.’ That is the first sign of staleness. Are we freshly born this minute, or are we stale, raking in our minds for something to do? Freshness does not come from obedience but from the Holy Spirit; obedience keeps us in the light as God is in the light.

Guard jealously your relationship to God. Jesus prayed…

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, January 20      Go To Evening Reading
 “Abel was a keeper of sheep.”           — Genesis 4:2
As a shepherd Abel sanctified his work to the glory of God, and offered a sacrifice of blood upon his altar, and the Lord had respect unto Abel and his offering. This early type of our Lord is exceedingly clear and distinct. Like the first streak of light which tinges the east at sunrise, it does not reveal everything, but it clearly manifests the great fact that the sun is coming. As we see Abel, a shepherd and yet a priest, offering a sacrifice of sweet smell unto God, we discern our Lord, who brings before his Father a sacrifice to which Jehovah ever hath respect. Abel was hated by his brother—hated without a cause; and even so was the Saviour: the natural and carnal man hated the accepted man in whom the Spirit of grace was found, and rested not until his blood had been shed. Abel fell, and sprinkled his altar and sacrifice with his own blood, and therein sets forth the Lord Jesus…