Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from January 22, 2016

Floor plan of a cottage

Floor plan of a cottage ‎The floor plan of a cottage in the Negev: The living quarter consisting of two rooms here is located on the left. This living area had about 25 square meters. In front of it is an enclosure in which the animals (sheep and goats) could be safely kept during the night.

The Purpose of Christ’s Death

The Purpose of Christ’s Death
Ephesians 5:26
Excerpt


The purpose of Christ’s death was to make the church holy (hagiasē,“to set apart” for Himself as His own forever; cf. Heb. 2:11; Heb. 10:10, Heb. 10:14; Heb. 13:12) which He did by cleansing her by the washing with water through the Word. This is not baptismal regeneration for that would be contrary to Paul’s teaching in this bookas well as all his other writings and the entire New Testament. Metaphorically, being regenerated is pictured as being cleansed by water (cf. “the washing of rebirth” in Titus 3:5). The “Word”(rhēmati) refers to the “preached Word” that unbelievers hear (cf. rhēma in Eph. 6:17; Rom. 10:8, Rom. 10:17; 1 Peter 1:25).


Hoehner, Harold W. “Ephesians.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 641. Print.

Responsible to God for the Work

Responsible to God for the Work
Excerpt


In this section, the builders were being warned about the quality of their work. The foundation of the church is a Person, not a doctrine (1 Corinthians 3:11). True building of the church involves a person’s participation in the very life of Christ. This cuts against the “I am of Paul” mentality. For the final evaluation (1 Corinthians 3:12–15), seeAmos 4:11 and Zechariah 3:2 regarding being saved through fire.

Paul shifted from God’s building (the church) to his dwelling (the individual Christian) (1 Corinthians 3:16–17). Paul reminded the Corinthians that their work would be evaluated at the judgment seat of Christ (2 Cor. 5:10; Rom. 14:10). Paul did not explain the nature of the reward (1 Cor. 3:14) but elsewhere referred to “crowns” as representative of the believers’ reward (1 Thess. 2:19; 2 Tim. 4:8; cf. alsoJames 1:12; 1 Pet. 5:4).


Hughes, Robert B., and J. Carl Laney. Tyndale Concise Bible Commentary. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers,…

“I AM” in Hebrew

“I AM” in Hebrew
Excerpt


The verb form used here is אֶהְיֶה (’ehyeh), the Qal imperfect, first person common singular, of the verb הָיָה (haya, “to be”). It forms an excellent paronomasia with the name. So when God used the verb to express his name, he used this form saying, “I am.” When his people refer to him as Yahweh, which is the third person masculine singular form of the same verb, they say “he is.” Some commentators argue for a future tense translation, “I will be who I will be,” because the verb has an active quality about it, and the Israelites lived in the light of the promises for the future. They argue that “I am” would be of little help to the Israelites in bondage. But a translation of “I will be” does not effectively do much more except restrict it to the future. The idea of the verb would certainly indicate that God is not bound by time, and while he is present (“I am”) he will always be present, even in the future, and so “I am” would embrace that as well (see alsoRuth…

Wisdom vs. Knowledge?

Wisdom vs. Knowledge?
Proverbs 3:5–7
Excerpt


Although this passage certainly condemns any academic arrogance, it does not indulge in anti-intellectualism. The commitment of the heart to God means that all the beliefs and decisions of life are to be submitted to Yahweh. Even very practical decisions are in view here, and not just matters of academic pursuit. But the text is no more opposed to academic research per se than to any normal activity of life. Also, “understanding” implies not just intellectual capacity but one’s own moral standards. One’s private vision of right and wrong must be submitted to God.


Garrett, Duane A. Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs. Vol. 14. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1993. Print. The New American Commentary.

Fathers and Mothers

Fathers and Mothers
Excerpt


This is the title of the new part of the book; it is omitted in the Septuagint. There is some kind of loose connection in the grouping of these proverbs, but it is difficult to follow. “Ordo frustra quæritur ubi nullus fuit observatus,” says Mart. Geier. Wordsworth considers the present chapter to contain exemplifications of the principles and results of the two ways of life displayed in the preceding nine chapters. The antithetical character of the sentences is most marked and well-sustained. As the book is specially designed for the edification of youth, it begins with an appropriate saying. A wise son maketh a glad father. As wisdom comprises all moral excellence, and folly is vice and perversity, the opposite characters attributed to the son are obvious. The mother is introduced for the sake of parallelism; though some commentators suggest that, as the father would be naturally elated by his son’s virtues, which would conduce to honour and high estate, s…

Unbelieving Jews were Blind

Unbelieving Jews were Blind
Excerpt


The subsequent evaluation of Jesus confirmed this distinction between seeing and not seeing in the comparison made between the believing man and the unbelieving Jews. Blindness is here to be interpreted on two levels (John 9:39). On the one hand, the Pharisees who had by physical standards been able to see were by spiritual standards revealed to be blind. On the other hand, the former blind man who had come to see physically in fact also became the model of spiritual perception. Jesus’ answer to the Pharisees’ question concerning their state (John 9:40) was thus for the evangelist self-evident. Accordingly, Jesus confirmed the continuation of their pitiful state of both blindness and guilt. The judgment on the blind state of the Pharisees here in John was not very different from Jesus’ judgment on the hypocritical Pharisees of Matt 23:16–19, who were condemned as pathetic, blind guides.


Borchert, Gerald L. John 1–11. Vol. 25A. Nashville: Broadman &…

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

January 22

  There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God
    Heb. 4:9
How sweet the music of this first heavenly chime floating across the waters of death from the towers of the New Jerusalem. Pilgrim, faint under thy long and arduous pilgrimage, hear it! It is REST. Soldier, carrying still upon thee blood and dust of battle, hear it! It is REST. Voyager, tossed on the waves of sin and sorrow, driven hither and thither on the world’s heaving ocean of vicissitude, hear it! The haven is in sight; the very waves that are breaking on thee seem to murmur, SoHe giveth His belovedREST. It is the long drawn sigh of existence at last answered. The toil and travail of earth’s protracted week is at an end. The calm of its unbroken Sabbath is begun. Man, weary man, has found at last the long-sought-for rest in the bosom of his God!

Macduff

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

January 22: Be Vigilant
Genesis 35:16–36:43; Matthew 26:14–56;Ecclesiastes 8:10–17

Faith doesn’t always come to bear until we are faced with our own fallibility. When we “enter into temptation,” it often means we haven’t been vigilant—that we’ve stopped pursuing the God who has pursued us. In the aftermath of temptation, we recognize our spiritual laziness. We become wise—but remorsefully.
Vigilance and complacency are illustrated in the garden of Gethsemane. In His last moments, Jesus requests that His closest disciples stay awake with Him (Matt 26:38). But while He repeatedly prays, they fall asleep. What seems like a request for moral support gets defined a few verses later: “Stay awake and pray that you will not enter into temptation” (Matt 26:41). Staying awake is associated with spiritual awareness. And their sleep is costly. Because of their spiritual sleepiness, they’re not prepared for His end, even though He had repeatedly prepared them for His death. They abandon Him, and th…

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

January 22nd
What am I looking at?


Look unto Me, and be ye saved. Isaiah 45:22.

Do we expect God to come to us with His blessings and save us? He says—‘Look unto Me, and be saved.’ The great difficulty spiritually is to concentrate on God, and it is His blessings that make it difficult. Troubles nearly always make us look to God; His blessings are apt to make us look elsewhere. The teaching of the Sermon on the Mount is, in effect—Narrow all your interests until the attitude of mind and heart and body is concentration on Jesus Christ.
Many of us have a mental conception of what a Christian should be, and the lives of the saints become a hindrance to our concentration on God. There is no salvation in this way, it is not simple enough. “Look unto Me” and—not ‘you will be saved,’ but ‘you are saved.’ The very thing we look for, we shall find if we will concentrate on Him. We get preoccupied and sulky with God, while all the time He is saying—‘Look up and be saved.’ The difficulties and …

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, January 22      Go To Evening Reading
 “Son of man, What is the vine tree more than any tree, or than a branch which is among the trees of the forest?”          — Ezekiel 15:2
These words are for the humbling of God’s people; they are called God’s vine, but what are they by nature more than others? They, by God’s goodness, have become fruitful, having been planted in a good soil; the Lord hath trained them upon the walls of the sanctuary, and they bring forth fruit to his glory; but what are they without their God? What are they without the continual influence of the Spirit, begetting fruitfulness in them? O believer, learn to reject pride, seeing that thou hast no ground for it. Whatever thou art, thou hast nothing to make thee proud. The more thou hast, the more thou art in debt to God; and thou shouldst not be proud of that which renders thee a debtor. Consider thine origin; look back to what thou wast. Consider what thou wouldst have been but for divine grace. Look upon t…