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Showing posts from February 16, 2016

Loyalty and Faithfulness

Loyalty and Faithfulness

Proverbs 3:3

Excerpt


Loyalty and faithfulness are a combination of qualities that occur in such passages as Gen 24:49; Exo 34:6; Deut 7:9; and Psa 25:10 and express the ideal relationship between people or between God and people. The two words overlap considerably in their meanings. In Gen 47:29 the word renderedloyalty (Hebrew chesed) is used of the relationship of Joseph to his father Jacob and in Exo 34:6 of the relationship of the Lord to his own people. An essential element in loyalty is love, and the word is sometimes translated as “love.”NJB says “faithful love.”


Reyburn, William David, and Euan McG. Fry. A Handbook on Proverbs. New York: United Bible Societies, 2000. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Evangelical Commentary on the Bible. Vol. 3

David’s fame

Excerpt


As Goliath moves in to silence his brash opponent, David slings one of the stones with unerring accuracy. It strikes the Philistine on the forehead, perhaps killing him instantly (v. 49). David then removes Goliath’s sword from the scabbard and cuts off his head. Stunned by this turn of events, the Philistines flee back to their coastal cities with the Israelites in hot pursuit. As David had predicted in verse 46, many of the Philistines are killed along the way. David puts Goliath’s weapons in his own tent and later dedicates the sword to the Lord, taking it to the tabernacle (21:9) as a way of acknowledging that God gave him the victory. According to verse 54, David took Goliath’s head to Jerusalem. This may refer to a later time after David conquered Jerusalem (2 Sam. 5:1–9) or it may mean that a number of Israelites already lived in Jerusalem. Since Jerusalem was a major city, it would have been a logical place to display a trophy of victory. More


Elwell, Walter …

Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible

Walk in His Ways

Excerpt


The psalmist here shows that godly people are happy people; they are, and shall be, blessed indeed. Felicity is the thing we all pretend to aim at and pursue. He does not say here wherein it consists; it is enough for us to know what we must do and be that we may attain to it, and that we are here told. All men would be happy, but few take the right way; God has here laid before us the right way, which we may be sure will end in happiness, though it be strait and narrow. Blessednesses are to the righteous; all manner of blessedness. Now observe the characters of the happy people. Those are happy, 1. Who make the will of God the rule of all their actions, and govern themselves, in their whole conversation, by that rule: They walk in the law of the Lord, v. 1. God’s word is a law to them, not only in this or that instance, but in the whole course of their conversation; they walk within the hedges of that law, which they dare not break through by doing any thing it…

Egyptian Earrings

Egyptian Earrings


Bridge over the Jordan

Bridge over the Jordan

‎Jesus on his way southward was rejected by the Samaritans, and it is supposed that He and his company turned eastward and passed over the Jordan and through Bethshean and then turned southward, passing down on the eastern side of the sacred river. It was during this time while in Peræa that Jesus sent forth the seventy.—Luke 10:1–16. During his journey he gave the parable of the good Samaritan—Luke 10:25–37; taught the disciples how to pray—Luke 11:1–13; healed a man blind, dumb and possessed—Matthew 12:22–23; Luke 11:14; pronounced woe upon the Pharisees—Luke 11:37–44; gave the parable of the rich fool—Luke 12:13–21; gave the parable of the barren fig tree—Luke 13:6–9; healed an infirm woman upon the Sabbath—Luke 13:10–17; gave the parable of the mustard seed and the leaven—Luke 13:18–21; goes on teaching and journeying toward Jerusalem and is warned against Herod. We have in the above picture a representation of a bridge over the Jordan. This is a modern brid…

The Letter to the Ephesians

The Letter to the Ephesians
Learn Christ

Ephesians 4:20–21

Excerpt


The first formulation, ‘you did not learn Christ that way’, is without parallel. The phrase ‘to learn a person’ appears nowhere else in the Greek Bible, and to date it has not been traced in any prebiblical Greek document. In Colossians, the same verb is used of the readers having ‘learned’ the ‘grace of God’ from Epaphras, who had given them systematic instruction in the gospel (Col. 1:7). Here in Ephesians Christ himself is the content of the teaching which the readers learned. Just as he is the subject of the apostolic preaching and teaching (1 Cor. 1:23;15:12; 2 Cor. 1:19; 4:5; 11:4; Phil. 1:15; cf. Acts 5:42), so he is the one whom the hearers ‘learn’ and ‘receive’. More


O’Brien, Peter Thomas. The Letter to the Ephesians. Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1999. Print. The Pillar New Testament Commentary.

The Letter to the Ephesians

Learn Christ

Ephesians 4:20–21

Excerpt


The first formulation, ‘you did not learn Christ that way’, is without parallel. The phrase ‘to learn a person’ appears nowhere else in the Greek Bible, and to date it has not been traced in any prebiblical Greek document. In Colossians, the same verb is used of the readers having ‘learned’ the ‘grace of God’ from Epaphras, who had given them systematic instruction in the gospel (Col. 1:7). Here in Ephesians Christ himself is the content of the teaching which the readers learned. Just as he is the subject of the apostolic preaching and teaching (1 Cor. 1:23;15:12; 2 Cor. 1:19; 4:5; 11:4; Phil. 1:15; cf. Acts 5:42), so he is the one whom the hearers ‘learn’ and ‘receive’. More


O’Brien, Peter Thomas. The Letter to the Ephesians. Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1999. Print. The Pillar New Testament Commentary.

Acrocorinth from the Lower City

Acrocorinth from the Lower City
‎The Acrocorinth (Corinth Acropolis) from the ruins of the lower city.

Connect the Testaments

February 16: Wit, Wordplay, and Euphemism
Exodus 37–38; John 6:25–51; Song of Solomon 5:1–4

The Bible is a passionate book. It’s about a God who is impassioned for His people and who ultimately sends His Son to die for them so that they can be saved from themselves. And it also portrays the passion seen in romantic love.

Song of Solomon 5:1–4 is full of wit, wordplay, and euphemism. It’s dramatic, like a play. The man is full of zeal for the woman he loves, and the woman is excited to see her man. And this isn’t a Michael Bolton ballad or Kenny G song. There is haste. There is anxiety—you can almost hear the heart palpitations. This isn’t the stuff for the unmarried, and it is definitely not the stuff for kids or teenagers. This is true romance as God designed it.

The woman says, “I slept, but my heart was awake” (Song 5:2). She may be asleep, but her love for the man is not. That is both the type of love we must have in marriage and the type of love we must have for our God—never sleep…

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 16      Go To Evening Reading
     “I have learned, in whatever state I am, therewith to be content.”           — Philippians 4:11
These words show us that contentment is not a natural propensity of man. “Ill weeds grow apace.” Covetousness, discontent, and murmuring are as natural to man as thorns are to the soil. We need not sow thistles and brambles; they come up naturally enough, because they are indigenous to earth: and so, we need not teach men to complain; they complain fast enough without any education. But the precious things of the earth must be cultivated. If we would have wheat, we must plough and sow; if we want flowers, there must be the garden, and all the gardener’s care. Now, contentment is one of the flowers of heaven, and if we would have it, it must be cultivated; it will not grow in us by nature; it is the new nature alone that can produce it, and even then we must be specially careful and watchful that we maintain and cultivate the grace which G…

My Utmost for His Highest

February 16th
The inspiration of spiritual initiative


Arise from the dead. Eph. 5:14.

All initiative is not inspired. A man may say to you—‘Buck up, take your disinclination by the throat, throw it overboard, and walk out into the thing!’ That is ordinary human initiative. But when the Spirit of God comes in and says, in effect, ‘Buck up,’ we find that the initiative is inspired.

We all have any number of visions and ideals when we are young, but sooner or later we find that we have no power to make them real. We cannot do the things we long to do, and we are apt to settle down to the visions and ideals as dead, and God has to come and say—“Arise from the dead.” When the inspiration of God does come, it comes with such miraculous power that we are able to arise from the dead and do the impossible thing. The remarkable thing about spiritual initiative is that the life comes after we do the ‘bucking up.’ God does not give us overcoming life; He gives us life as we overcome. When the in…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 16
  Boast not thyself of tomorrow Prov. 27:1
The only preparation for the morrow is the right use of today. The stone in the hands of the builder must be put in its place and fitted to receive another. The morrow comes for naught, if today is not heeded. Neglect not the call that comes to thee this day, for such neglect is nothing else than boasting thyself of tomorrow.

G. Bowen

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.