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Showing posts from February 23, 2016

Damascus

Damascus

‎Traditional Site of Paul’s Escape.

Doxa

Doxa

Excerpt


‎Doxa essentially describes manifestations of supernatural splendor or divine glory. In the Greek translation of the OT (LXX), doxa is the usual translation for the Hebrew word kabod, whose primary meaning relates to weight (being heavy, weighty, or impressive). God’s presence was manifested by a visible, luminous phenomenon referred to as His doxa, which rested in particular in the tabernacle or temple (Exod 40:34–35; 1 Kgs 8:11; Hag 2:7 lxx).

‎In the nt, doxa can also refer to the visible splendor or brightness of God’s presence (e.g. Rev 15:8; 21:11). Writing to the Romans, Paul uses doxa to describe the direct presence of God and the communion with Him that was forfeited by humanity at the fall (Rom 3:23). …


Barry, John D. et al. Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012. Print.

Semeion in the Gospel of John

Semeion in the Gospel of John

John 3:2

Excerpt


In the Gospel there is general reference to the σημεῖα of Jesus (2:23; 3:2; 6:2,26; 9:16) and sometimes there is summary mention of their great number (11:47; 12:37; 20:30). But a few are specially emphasised. In general they are the kind of miracles expected with the dawn of the Messianic age, cf. the saying in Is. 35:5 (Mt. 11:5/Lk. 7:22).309 No matter how one computes the number of σημεῖα of Jesus which were particularly important for the Evangelist,310 those miracles which he records bear Messianic features and are thus in some sense Messianic epiphany-miracles. The miracle at the wedding in Cana of Galilee in Jn. 2:11, the second miracle at Cana (the healing of the son of the βασιλικός) in 4:54, the feeding of the multitude in 6:14 and the raising of Lazarus in 12:18 are all explicitly called σημεῖα. In relation to theσημεῖα mentioned in 9:16 the healing of the man born blind (9:1ff.) is to the fore, while the healing of the lame man on…

Walking and Talking

Walking and Talking

Excerpt


Jesus finished His work on earth (John 17:4)—the work of giving His life as a sacrifice for sin. Today He has an “unfinished work” in heaven. He represents us before God’s throne. As our High Priest, He sympathizes with our weaknesses and temptations and gives us grace (Heb. 4:15–16; 7:23–28). As our Advocate, He helps us when we sin. When we confess our sins to God, because of Christ’s advocacy God forgives us. More


Wiersbe, Warren W. The Bible Exposition Commentary. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996. Print.

Mourning for Userhet

Mourning for Userhet
‎ In this Egyptian tomb painting, women mourn for Userhet. A nobleman contemporaneous with Thutmose IV (reigned c. 1397–1388 B.C.), Userhet’s titles included “Overseer of Amun’s Fields.” His prestigious burial place, in the Valley of the Kings across the Nile from Thebes, underscores his high rank. In Bible times, mourners often placed their hands on their head, tore their clothing, wore garments of coarse cloth, wailed, and sat or lay on dust and ashes or applied them to their heads. Female mourners often left their hair uncombed and unbraided.

‎Gen 37:34, 2 Sam 13:19, Esth 4:1, Job 42:5–6, Jer 6:26, Amos 8:10, Matt 11:21, Rev 18:7

‎Image by the Yorck Project, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Public Domain


I am the Lord thy God

I am the Lord thy God

Excerpt


The ten precepts were prefaced by this distinct announcement of who it was that uttered them. God would have the Israelites clearly understand, that he himself gave them the commandments. It is only possible to reconcile the declarations of the New Testament, that the law was given by the ministration of angels (Acts 7:53; Gal. 3:19; Heb. 2:2) with this and other plain statements, by regarding God the Son as the actual speaker As sent by his father, he too was, in a certain sense, an angel (i.e., a messenger).
Whichbrought thee out of the land of Egypt. God does not appeal to his authority as creator, but to his mercy and kindness as protector and deliverer. He would be obeyed by his people from a sentiment of love, not by fear Out ofthe house of bondage. Compare ch. 13:3, 14; and for the ground of the expression, see ch. 1:14; 6:9 More


Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. Exodus. Vol. 2. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commenta…

Dipylon Inscription, Old Written Greek

Dipylon Inscription, Old Written Greek

‎The archaic Greek sentence written on this wine jug or “oinochoe” is known as the Dipylon Inscription. One of the oldest known inscriptions featuring identifiable Greek characters, it means, “Whoever of all these dancers now plays/dances most delicately, to him this …” Experts on Greek ceramics believe this jug, made in about 740 B.C. and found in the ancient Dipylon Cemetery in Athens, was a prize in a dance contest.
‎John 19:20, Rev 1:8, Rev 21:6, Rev 22:13 ‎Image by user Durutomo, from Wikimedia Commons. License: CC BY-SA 3.0

Connect the Testaments

February 23: Freedom
Leviticus 14; John 8:31–59;Song of Solomon 7:1–4

“Even though I know it’s wrong, I sometimes think, ‘If I hadn’t accepted Christ, I would have so much more freedom.’ And then I venture down that road and realize just how terrible it is. It takes me to a very dark place.”

This deep, heart-wrenching statement by a friend made me realize there are countless people who probably feel this way about Jesus. And what if, unlike my friend, they hadn’t figured out the latter part of this statement? They were probably walking a road closer to legalism than the road Christ envisions for our lives. Or they could be so far from actually experiencing grace and the empowerment of the Holy Spirit that they have yet to see how incredible a life lived for Jesus can be.

Jesus promises freedom: “Then Jesus said to those Jews who had believed him, ‘If you continue in my word you are truly my disciples, and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free’ ” (John 8:31–32). What w…

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 23      Go To Evening Reading
 “I will never leave thee.”           — Hebrews 13:5
No promise is of private interpretation. Whatever God has said to any one saint, he has said to all. When he opens a well for one, it is that all may drink. When he openeth a granary-door to give out food, there may be some one starving man who is the occasion of its being opened, but all hungry saints may come and feed too. Whether he gave the word to Abraham or to Moses, matters not, O believer; he has given it to thee as one of the covenanted seed. There is not a high blessing too lofty for thee, nor a wide mercy too extensive for thee. Lift up now thine eyes to the north and to the south, to the east and to the west, for all this is thine. Climb to Pisgah’s top, and view the utmost limit of the divine promise, for the land is all thine own. There is not a brook of living water of which thou mayst not drink. If the land floweth with milk and honey, eat the honey and drink the milk,…

My Utmost for His Highest

February 23rd
The determination to serve


The son of Man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister. Matthew 20:28.
Paul’s idea of service is the same as our Lord’s: “I am among you as He that serveth”; “ourselves your servants for Jesus’ sake.” We have the idea that a man called to the Ministry is called to be a different kind of being from other men. According to Jesus Christ, he is called to be the ‘door-mat’ of other men; their spiritual leader, but never their superior. “I know how to be abased,” says Paul. This is Paul’s idea of service—‘I will spend myself to the last ebb for you; you may give me praise or give me blame, it will make no difference. So long as there is a human being who does not know Jesus Christ, I am his debtor to serve him until he does.’ The mainspring of Paul’s service is not love for men, but love for Jesus Christ. If we are devoted to the cause of humanity, we shall soon be crushed and broken-hearted, for we shall often meet with more ingratitude fro…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 23

  Philip findeth Nathanael and saith unto him, We have found him of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write.… Come and see
John 1:45, 46
The next thing to knowing that “we have found him” is to find someone else, and say, “Come and see.”

Frances Ridley Havergal

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.