Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February 25, 2016

Prosperity

Prosperity

Psalm 1:3

Excerpt


For all who take their delight in living by God’s Word, there is prosperity. Under the image of a fruitful tree, the psalmist declared that whatever the righteous do will prosper (cf. 92:12-14). Two qualifications need to be noted. First, the fruit, that is, the prosperity, is produced in its season and not necessarily immediately after planting. Second, what the godly person does will be controlled by the Law of God (1:2). So if a person meditates on God’s Word, his actions will be godly, and his God-controlled activities will prosper, that is, come to their divinely directed fulfillment.


Ross, Allen P. “Psalms.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 790. Print.

An Altar of Earth

An Altar of Earth
‎ In Exodus 20:24, Yahweh commands Moses to build an altar of earth or clay. This may refer to blocks of sod or sun-fired mud brick (Isa 65:3). However, many altars of earth likely included stones, just as many altars of unworked stone also included clay.

In the Beginning...

In the Beginning...

Genesis 1:1

Excerpt


In the beginning refers to the time when God began to create. If the translator interprets this as a dependent clause, the opening clause may be translated, for example, “When God began to create,” “At the time when God began to create,” or “In the beginning of God’s creation.” If the traditional interpretation is followed, then the beginning refers to the time when the universe came into existence, rather than the beginning or opening of the story of creation. More


Reyburn, William David, and Euan McG. Fry. A Handbook on Genesis. New York: United Bible Societies, 1998. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Entrance to Tiberias

Entrance to Tiberias
‎The above picture is very beautiful—the heavy wall, the fine arch, the graceful palms, the sea and the mountains beyond. This entrance is on the western wall of Tiberias. Through this all travelers from Nazareth pass into the city. Like Jerusalem, “Tiberias is regarded as a holy place by both Christian and Jew.” Here Christ taught; here the Jews believe that the Messiah will rise from the waters of the lake, land in the city and place His throne at Safed, three thousand feet above the city. Tiberias occupied a very high rank as a Roman city. It was surrounded by a wall three miles in circumference—longer than the ancient wall of London or of modern Jerusalem. Here Herod Antipater resided during our Lord’s ministry. It was for this reason that Pontius Pilatus, when he heard that Christ was a Galilean, sent Him to Herod. How earthly names and earthly fortunes change! Herod in his day was famous, rich and conspicious; Christ was unknown, poor and despised, but as w…

Walk Properly Before Unbelievers

Walk Properly Before Unbelievers

Excerpt


There are good reasons for these exhortations. Such behavior does win the respect of non-Christians and so glorifies the Christian’s God. Love of this kind is appreciated by everyone. Paul placed importance on the testimony of Christians before outsiders, unbelievers. This kind of behavior also wins the respect of Christians; people appreciate those who do not take advantage of them. Paul discouraged the Thessalonians from expecting financial favors from the brethren simply because they were fellow Christians. Nor was he promoting a fierce spirit of independence; he was not saying that every Christian must become completely self-sufficient. He was advocating personal responsibility, as is clear from the context. This is a manifestation of mature Christian love for the brethren.


Constable, Thomas L. “1 Thessalonians.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Boo…

“Spoken by the Prophets”

“Spoken by the Prophets”

Excerpt


The first line is from Isa. 62:11, the rest from Zech. 9:9. John (12:14f.) makes it clear that Jesus did not quote the passage himself. In Matthew it is not so plain, but probably it is his own comment about the incident. It is not Christ’s intention to fulfil the prophecy, simply that his conduct did fulfil it.


Robertson, A.T. Word Pictures in the New Testament. Nashville, TN: Broadman Press, 1933. Print.

His Lot Was to Burn Incense

His Lot Was to Burn Incense

Excerpt


The part assigned to each priest in his week of service was decided by lot. Three were employed at the offering of incense—to remove the ashes of the former service; to bring in and place on the golden altar the pan filled with hot burning coals taken from the altar of burnt offering; and to sprinkle the incense on the hot coals; and, while the smoke of it ascended, to make intercession for the people. This was the most distinguished part of the service (Rev 8:3), and this was what fell to the lot of Zacharias at this time [Lightfoot].


Jamieson, Robert, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Vol. 2. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments

February 25: The Fear
Leviticus 17:1–19:37; John 9:13–34; Song of Solomon 7:10–13

We often don’t realize that we’re guilty of fearing others. At the time, it can feel definite and look legitimate. Fearing others can also take the form of a meticulous house, staying late at the office, or passing anxious, sleepless nights. When we hold someone else’s opinions higher than God’s, we suddenly find our world shaky and imbalanced.

Jesus’ healing of the blind man reveals that the fear of people is not a modern concept. The Pharisees had a stranglehold on Jewish life: “for the Jews had already decided that if anyone should confess him to be Christ, he would be expelled from the synagogue” (John 9:22). The blind man’s parents were victims of their mission, but they were willing victims. Even within the ruling ranks, though, opinions were divided, but the fear of people still ruled (John 9:16). John reports elsewhere that “many of the rulers believed in him, but because of the Pharisees they did…

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 25      Go To Evening Reading
“The wrath to come.”  — Matthew 3:7
It is pleasant to pass over a country after a storm has spent itself; to smell the freshness of the herbs after the rain has passed away, and to note the drops while they glisten like purest diamonds in the sunlight. That is the position of a Christian. He is going through a land where the storm has spent itself upon his Saviour’s head, and if there be a few drops of sorrow falling, they distil from clouds of mercy, and Jesus cheers him by the assurance that they are not for his destruction. But how terrible is it to witness the approach of a tempest: to note the forewarning of the storm; to mark the birds of heaven as they droop their wings; to see the cattle as they lay their heads low in terror; to discern the face of the sky as it groweth black, and look to the sun which shineth not, and the heavens which are angry and frowning! How terrible to await the dread advance of a hurricane—such as occurs, …

My Utmost for His Highest

February 25th
The destitution of service


Though the more abundantly I love you, the less I be loved. 2 Cor. 12:15.

Natural love expects some return, but Paul says—‘I do not care whether you love me or not, I am willing to destitute myself completely, not merely for your sakes, but that I may get you to God.’ “For ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor.” Paul’s idea of service is exactly along that line—‘I do not care with what extravagance I spend myself, and I will do it gladly.’ It was a joyful thing to Paul.

The ecclesiastical idea of a servant of God is not Jesus Christ’s idea. His idea is that we serve Him by being the servants of other men. Jesus Christ out-socialists the socialists. He says that in His Kingdom he that is greatest shall be the servant of all. The real test of the saint is not preaching the gospel, but washing disciples’ feet, that is, doing the things that do not count in the actual estimate of me…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 25
  Thy gentleness hath made me great 2 Sam. 22:36
The gentleness of Christ is the comeliest ornament that a Christian can wear.
William Arnot

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.