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Towers Beside A City Gate

Towers Beside A City Gate


TOWERS BESIDE A CITY GATE
At the gates he built towers: The text does not tell us how many gates there were or how many towers. TEV indicates one tower at each gate, but the text does not say this. The author could well be thinking of two at each gate, one on either side. Towers were immense stone structures either built on the walls or, in this case, attached to the walls beside a gate. On these towers were protected places where archers could shoot down on the enemy soldiers.
Many translators will need to use a descriptive phrase; for example, “high strong buildings beside each gate” (so also TOB 13:12). Sixty cubits wide at the foundations may be rendered “with a base that was ninety feet wide” (CEV) or “that was ninety feet [or, thirty meters] wide at the bottom.”
Gates … forty cubits wide means “gates … sixty feet [or, twenty meters] wide.” It is important that the information about the width of the gates be placed in conjunction with the following info…

Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve

Excerpt


This section (2:4–7) is introduced as “the account of the heavens and the earth”; this is the first of ten units in Genesis introduced with “account of” (or, “story of, descendants of”). In a sense man is viewed as the offspring of the heavens and the earth. But it is an earth without vegetation (v. 5a) and water (v. 5b), except for subterranean streams (v. 6).

God is pictured as a potter. He forms man from the dust. Perhaps we should translate dust as mud or clay, for potters do not work with dust. The idea of God creating man from the earth is mentioned elsewhere in the Old Testament (Job 4:19; 10:8; Pss. 90:3; 103:14; 104:29; 146:4). Not only is God potter, he is animator as well. God breathes the breath of life into man. More


Elwell, Walter A. Evangelical Commentary on the Bible. Vol. 3. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 1995. Print. Baker Reference Library.

Herod’s Gate

Herod’s Gate

Greetings to the Seven Churches

Greetings to the Seven Churches

Excerpt


As with the prologue in 1:1–3, the greeting was written after John had experienced the visions of the book. It presents the major themes of the book: seven churches, the eternality of God, Jesus the faithful witness, and God’s eternal glory and dominion. These themes will be illustrated throughout the book. John gave a standard blessing: “grace and peace.” Revelation is addressed to the seven churches of Asia. The churches were in cities Paul had visited on his second and third missionary journeys. As elder, or bishop, of Ephesus, the apostle John was responsible for these churches. Note the structure of 1:4–8. It starts and ends with the eternality of God (cf. Exod. 3:14–15). The middle part describes the person and work of Jesus, which results in believers being “priests” (1:6). The servants of God do their priestly ministry in Christ surrounded by the eternal power and nature of the Father. More


Hughes, Robert B., and J. Carl Laney. Tyndale Conc…

Be Hospitable

Be Hospitable

Excerpt


Hospitality (philazenos, “love of strangers”) is a telltale virtue of the people of God. Paul told the Roman church to “Share with God’s people who are in need. Practice hospitality” (Romans 12:13). “Practice” means “pursue” or “chase” and sometimes means “strenuous pursuit.” Christians, and especially leaders, are not simply to wait for opportunities for hospitality but are to pursue them. They are to do it “without grumbling,” as Peter says (1 Peter4:9).

Today’s elder must be a joyous host. He must invite people to his table. His home must be open. Hospitality is all over the New Testament. And the writer of Hebrews offers an enchanting motivation: “Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by so doing some people have entertained angels without knowing it” (13:2). These are God’s thoughts on hospitality!


Hughes, R. Kent, and Bryan Chapell. 1 & 2 Timothyand Titus: To Guard the Deposit. Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2000. Print. Preaching the Word.

A Copper Crown

A Copper Crown

A copper crown, one of 416 copper objects found in the “Cave of the Treasure,” in the Nahal Mishmar in southern Palestine; forth millenium B.C.
Powell, Mark Allan, ed. “Zurishaddai.” The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated) 2011 : n. pag. Print.

North Shore, Sea of Galilee

North Shore, Sea of Galilee

‎The rocky northern shoreline of the Sea of Galilee.

Connect the Testaments

February 26: Patiently Waiting
Leviticus 20:1–22:33; John 9:35–41; Song of Solomon 8:1–5

Delayed gratification is a foreign concept to our natural instincts. Our culture doesn’t encourage patience or contentment; we would prefer to have our desires met the moment they arise.

The woman in Song of Solomon tells us that she is delighted in her beloved. She praises his attributes and tells of the wonders of their love. But throughout the poem, at seemingly random moments, she also warns the daughters of Jerusalem about love: “I adjure you … do not arouse or awaken love until it pleases!” (Song 8:4).

This is not the first time she has “adjured” them to wait and have patience: the same refrain is found elsewhere in the poem, and it acts like an oath (Song 2:7; 3:5). Although the elevated poetry glories in love, delight, and fulfillment, it also warns about immediate gratification. The woman urges us not to force love. It is something that must be anticipated and protected, not enjoyed before…

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 26      Go To Evening Reading
   “Salvation is of the Lord.”   — Jonah 2:9
Salvation is the work of God. It is he alone who quickens the soul “dead in trespasses and sins,” and it is he also who maintains the soul in its spiritual life. He is both “Alpha and Omega.” “Salvation is of the Lord.” If I am prayerful, God makes me prayerful; if I have graces, they are God’s gifts to me; if I hold on in a consistent life, it is because he upholds me with his hand. I do nothing whatever towards my own preservation, except what God himself first does in me. Whatever I have, all my goodness is of the Lord alone. Wherein I sin, that is my own; but wherein I act rightly, that is of God, wholly and completely. If I have repulsed a spiritual enemy, the Lord’s strength nerved my arm. Do I live before men a consecrated life? It is not I, but Christ who liveth in me. Am I sanctified? I did not cleanse myself: God’s Holy Spirit sanctifies me. Am I weaned from the world? I am weaned by…

My Utmost for His Highest

February 26th
Inferior misgivings about Jesus


Sir, Thou hast nothing to draw with. John 4:11.

‘I am impressed with the wonder of what God says, but He cannot expect me really to live it out in the details of my life!’ When it comes to facing Jesus Christ on His own merits, our attitude is one of pious superiority—‘Your ideals are high and they impress us, but in touch with actual things, it cannot be done.’ Each of us thinks about Jesus in this way in some particular. These misgivings about Jesus start from the amused questions put to us when we talk of our transactions with God—‘Where are you going to get your money from? How are you going to be looked after?’ Or they start from ourselves when we tell Jesus that our case is a bit too hard for Him. ‘It is all very well to say “Trust in the Lord,” but a man must live, and Jesus has nothing to draw with—nothing whereby to give us these things.’ Beware of the pious fraud in you which says—‘I have no misgivings about Jesus, only about my…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 26

  Jacob went on his way, and the angels of God met him
  Gen. 32:1
It is in the path where God has bade us walk that we shall find the angels around us. We may meet them, indeed, on paths of our own choosing, but it will be the sort of angel that Balaam met, with a sword in his hand, mighty and beautiful, but wrathful too; and we had better not front him! But the friendly helpers, the emissaries of God’s love, the apostles of His grace, do not haunt the roads that we make for ourselves.

Alexander Maclaren

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.