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Showing posts from February 27, 2016

Winnowing Grain

Winnowing Grain

‎The three Egyptian farm laborers shown here illustrate one of the final stages in grain production. They are winnowing the combination of grain kernels, chaff, and stalk fragments produced as the oxen tread the threshing floor. Winnowing uses wind to separate the kernels from the chaff. The wind blows the chaff away and the heavier kernels, as well as some other plant fragments, drop straight to the ground, ready for sifting. ‎Ruth 3:2, Isa 21:10, Isa 30:24, Jer 4:11, Luke 3:17

Temple of the Ark, Shiloh

Temple of the Ark, Shiloh

‎Leaving Shechem, the Nazareth party would pass by Jacob’s Well and in sight of Joseph’s Tomb. Another day’s journey would bring them to Seilûn—the Shiloh of the Scriptures, and probably the site of the first temple to Jehovah, the home of the Ark of the Covenant. Shiloh is used also as one of the names of the Messiah, as in Genesis 49:10, and means the Savior and the tranquility of peace from Him. It is written of this place: “But go ye now unto my place in Shiloh where I set my name at the first.”—Jeremiah 7:12. Here Eli lived, and Hannah prayed and was answered, and here Samuel served and was called to the priesthood. Here the holy oil burned before the ark “ere the lamps of God went out in the temple of the Lord,” and the ark, captured by the Philistines, came no more to Shiloh. If you approach it through the Valley of Ain El Haramyeh you follow the path skirting the east slope till it reaches the top of the pass, where a glimpse of Mt. Hermon is caught …

Sea of Galilee: Church of St. Peter’s Primacy—Statue

Sea of Galilee: Church of St. Peter’s Primacy—Statue


A statue beside the Church of St. Peter’s Primacy at Tabgha depicts Jesus, after his death and Resurrection, appearing before St. Peter. Passing his hand over St. Peter’s head, he crowns him as the future head of the Church. On the background of the blue sky merging into the blue sea the statue looks like a moving shadow.

The Office of Overseer

The Office of Overseer

Excerpt


The word “overseer” receives such translations as “bishop” (KJV, ASV), “Presiding-Officer” (TCNT), “superintendent” (Goodspeed), or “pastor” (Williams). In such passages as Acts 20:17, 28 and Titus 1:5, 7 the terms “elders” and “overseers” appear together to suggest that the positions are partially, if not fully, interchangeable.

In discussing the office of an overseer, Paul was not requesting that Timothy begin a new office in the church. Men were already functioning in the position (Acts 14:23; 20:17, 28). What Paul stipulated was that those appointed to the office were to possess qualifications of commitment.


Lea, Thomas D., and Hayne P. Griffin. 1, 2 Timothy, Titus. Vol. 34. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1992. Print. The New American Commentary.

The Serpent

The Serpent

Genesis 3:1

Excerpt


Genesis 3:1 is connected with 2:25 by a Hebrew wordplay: Adam and Eve were “naked” (‘ărûmmîm); and the serpent was more crafty (‘ārûm, “shrewd”) than all. Their nakedness represented the fact that they were oblivious to evil, not knowing where the traps lay, whereas Satan did and would use his craftiness to take advantage of their integrity. That quality of shrewdness or subtleness is not evil in itself (indeed, one of the purposes of the Bible is to make believers so, according to Prov. 1:4, where ‘ārmâh, shrewdness, is trans. “prudence”). But it was used here for an evil purpose.


Ross, Allen P. “Genesis.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 32. Print.

Three Heads of Emmer Wheat

Three Heads of Emmer Wheat

‎Emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccum), one of the earliest cultivated crops, was grown in many Bible lands, notably Egypt, Palestine, and Mesopotamia. Emmer thrives better than many other grains in a variety of marginal or arid soils. The long filaments projecting from each emmer kernel’s husk are called “awns,” and aid in plant propagation in wild varieties by helping the seed push itself down into the soil. ‎Exod 9:32, Isa 28:25, Ezek 4:9
‎Image by user Marknesbitt, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Public Domain

Ebal

Ebal

‎View across the village Nablus toward Mt. Ebal, where Joshua is said to have built an altar. The report of a few years ago that archeological evidence had proven the existence of the altar is incorrect. The excavated complex turned out to be the remainder of a residence and a tower. ‎Deut 11:29; 27:4, 27:13; Josh 8:30–33

Connect the Testaments

February 27: Reality Can Bite
Leviticus 23–25; John 10:1–21; Song of Solomon 8:6–9

Reality shows are all about people who are known or want to be known—they have celebrity syndrome. The root cause of this obsession is probably, like most things, a disconnect from our Maker. As people disconnect from the God who made us, we seek affirmation from other sources. And as wrong as this desire may be, our culture makes it feel like second nature.

The Jewish people Jesus spoke to also felt displaced. They were a people who had lost touch with their guide—their shepherd. Jesus is the answer to their call.

Echoing Ezekiel 34:11–24, He says, “I am the good shepherd, and I know my own, and my own know me, just as the Father knows me and I know the Father.”But Jesus goes one step further by adding, “and I lay down my life for the sheep”(John 10:14–15). Jesus promises that He will know us, and by echoing the very words of God, He is claiming that He is the God of Israel—He is the way God will know u…

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 27      Go To Evening Reading

         “Thou hast made the Lord, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation.”
         — Psalm 91:9

The Israelites in the wilderness were continually exposed to change. Whenever the pillar stayed its motion, the tents were pitched; but tomorrow, ere the morning sun had risen, the trumpet sounded, the ark was in motion, and the fiery, cloudy pillar was leading the way through the narrow defiles of the mountain, up the hill side, or along the arid waste of the wilderness. They had scarcely time to rest a little before they heard the sound of “Away! this is not your rest; you must still be onward journeying towards Canaan!” They were never long in one place. Even wells and palm trees could not detain them. Yet they had an abiding home in their God, his cloudy pillar was their roof-tree, and its flame by night their household fire. They must go onward from place to place, continually changing, never having time to settle, and …

My Utmost for His Highest

February 27th
The impoverished ministry of Jesus


From whence then hast Thou that living water? John 4:11.

“The well is deep”—and a great deal deeper than the Samaritan woman knew! Think of the depths of human nature, of human life, think of the depths of the ‘wells’ in you. Have you been impoverishing the ministry of Jesus so that He cannot do anything? Suppose there is a well of fathomless trouble inside your heart, and Jesus comes and says—“Let not your heart be troubled”; and you shrug your shoulders and say—‘But, Lord, the well is deep; You cannot draw up quietness and comfort out of it.’ No, He will bring them down from above. Jesus does not bring anything up from the wells of human nature. We limit the Holy One of Israel by remembering what we have allowed Him to do for us in the past, and by saying—‘Of course I cannot expect God to do this thing.’ The thing that taxes almightiness is the very thing which as disciples of Jesus we ought to believe He will do. We impoverish His mi…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 27

  I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father but by me
  John 14:6
Heaven often seems distant and unknown, but if He who made the road thither is our guide, we need not fear to lose the way. We do not want to see far ahead—only far enough to discern Him and trace His footsteps.… They who follow Christ, even through darkness, will surely reach the Father.

Henry Van Dyke

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.