Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February 29, 2016

God’s Elect

God’s Elect

1 Peter 1:1

Excerpt


These Christians lived in the Roman provinces which occupied the area of modern Turkey. They were a set of scattered groups and perhaps isolated individuals in a wide territory. In this respect they resembled the many Jews who lived in small communities scattered throughout the ancient world, and Peter’s wording deliberately echoes the self-description of the Jews as the scattered people outside their homeland.


Marshall, I. Howard. 1 Peter. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1991. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

The Sanhedrin

The Sanhedrin

Acts 4:5–6

Excerpt


The next day the supreme council or Sanhedrin meets, what Luke calls therulers, elders, and scribes (4:5). Some antecedent to this body was likely organized by Ezra after the exile (cf. Ezra 5:5; Neh. 2:16; etc.). By Peter’s time it is modeled after the group of seventy elders who assisted Moses (Num. 11:16–24; Mishnah Sanhedrin 1.1, 6). This court has come to exercise wide-ranging powers, functioning as the final authority in religious matters and handling many domestic political cases as well. The high priest presides over the assembly, with former high priests, members of privileged families, and noted jurists on the court with him. In earlier days the Sanhedrin was made up chiefly of Sadducees, but around 67 b.c. Pharisees gained in power. Now both parties are found in some strength in the Sanhedrin (cf. Acts 5:34–40;23:6–10).

The present meeting seems to be a specially called one. The councillors sit in a semicircle, with the presiding officer (high p…

Egyptian Litter

Egyptian Litter

Furnishings of the Tabernacle

Furnishings of the Tabernacle
. ‎The book of Exodus details the construction of the tabernacle and its furnishings. As Yahweh’s sanctuary, the tabernacle served as God’s dwelling place among the Israelites—the expression of the covenant between Yahweh and His people (Exod 25:8–9).

Chipped Stone Artifacts from the Pond Sediments in Area

Chipped Stone Artifacts from the Pond Sediments in Area

Fig. 23. Chipped stone artifacts from the pond sediments in Area 3. 1: Drill; 2; sickle blade; 3: Type 1 flake; 4: crested blade flake; 5: snapped blade; 6: Type 2 flake (drawn and inked by C. D’Annibale).
Testing of the pond area revealed similar intact chipped stone discard/reduction patterns. A total of 132 chipped stone artifacts were recovered from the in situ strata corresponding to the pond sediments. Compared with the abundance of chipped stone found in colluvial fans and gullies covering the site, this is a relatively small sample. These offer a glimpse, however, of what may be the only undisturbed and best represented assemblage on site (fig. 23).
Material disposed into the pond, intentionally or not, would remain buried within the sediments with little movement. As the pond dried up, the deposit was effectively sealed. The best evidence for an actual lithic reduction locus is found in N500E485. Here, 33 chert artifacts

Gehazi’s Covetousness

Gehazi’s Covetousness

‎In Refusing Naaman’s gifts, Elisha had meant to teach him a further lesson of God’s power and of the little worth of the great general’s earthy pomp. He had hoped to make upon the man a permanent impress which should be of worth to Israel. This aim was brought to naught by the covetousness of the prophet’s servant Gehazi.
‎Gehazi was a man of shrewd, wordly wisdom, but of little heavenly insight. He served Elisha long, and in the main faithfully. Yet now as he saw this opportunity of enormous wealth passing away from their door, he could not resist its temptation. Hurrying after Naaman’s cavalcade, he pretended to come by his master’s order, and made excuse for receiving some portion of the rejected gifts. Naaman gave him gladly double all he asked, then went onward feeling that he had repaid his obligations to Israel. Elisha saw well what his servant had done, though Gehazi sought to deny it. “Went not mine heart with thee!” sighed the master in sorrowful rebu…

Widow Mourns by Her Husband’s Mummy

Widow Mourns by Her Husband’s Mummy

‎Resurrection as a concept was integral to Egyptian religion. Egyptians believed that the goddess Isis helped her divine husband Osiris to rise from death. The belief system provided no certainty that a given human would rise again, however. First the god Thoth had to weigh the deceased’s soul. No one could know in advance what Thoth would decide. The woman in this picture, weeping before her nobleman husband’s coffin, does not know if she will ever see her husband again.
‎Gen 50:2–14, Isa 53:3, John 11:35, 1 Thess 4:13, Titus 1:2, ‎Image by the Yorck Project, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Public Domain

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 29      Go To Evening Reading
 “With lovingkindness have I drawn thee.”     — Jeremiah 31:3
The thunders of the law and the terrors of judgment are all used to bring us to Christ; but the final victory is effected by lovingkindness. The prodigal set out to his father’s house from a sense of need; but his father saw him a great way off, and ran to meet him; so that the last steps he took towards his father’s house were with the kiss still warm upon his cheek, and the welcome still musical in his ears.

   “Law and terrors do but harden
         All the while they work alone;
         But a sense of blood-bought pardon
         Will dissolve a heart of stone.”

The Master came one night to the door, and knocked with the iron hand of the law; the door shook and trembled upon its hinges; but the man piled every piece of furniture which he could find against the door, for he said, “I will not admit the man.” The Master turned away, but by-and-bye he came back, and with his own …

My Utmost for His Highest

February 29th
What do you want the Lord to do for you?


Lord, that I may receive my sight. Luke 18:41.

What is the thing that not only disturbs you but makes you a disturbance? It is always something you cannot deal with yourself. “They rebuked him, that he should hold his peace: but he cried so much the more.” Persist in the disturbance until you yet get face to face with the Lord Himself; do not deify common sense. When Jesus asks us what we want Him to do for us in regard to the incredible thing with which we are faced, remember that He does not work in commonsense ways, but in supernatural ways.

Watch how we limit the Lord by remembering what we have allowed Him to do for us in the past: ‘I always failed there, and I always shall’; consequently we do not ask for what we want, ‘It is ridiculous to ask God to do this.’ If it is an impossibility, it is the thing we have to ask. If it is not an impossible thing, it is not a real disturbance. God will do the absolutely impossible.

This…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 28

  Forgetting those things which are behind … I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus
  Phil. 3:13, 14
It is not by regretting what is irreparable that true work is to be done, but by making the best of what we are. It is not by complaining that we have not the right tools, but by using well the tools we have. What we are and where we are, is God’s providential arrangement—God’s doing, though it may be man’s misdoing. Life is a series of mistakes, and he is not the best Christian who makes the fewest false steps. He is the best who wins the most splendid victories by the retrieval of mistakes.

F. W. Robertson

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.