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Showing posts from March 1, 2016

Rev. B. W. Smith - "Watch Them Dogs"

Rev. B. W. Smith - "You Got What You Wanted But Lost What You Had"

Suffering and Sovereignty

Suffering and Sovereignty

Excerpt


‎Is God working all things together for good, even those baffling and horrific things that involve suffering? Romans 8:28 tells us that “for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose” (ESV). The Old Testament version of Rom 8:28 is Gen 50:20. In that story, Joseph’s brothers betrayed him and sold him into slavery when he was only a boy. Decades later he told them, “As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today” (Gen 50:20 (ESV). … More


Barry, John D. et al. Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012. Print.

Noah Enters the Ark

Noah Enters the Ark

Excerpt


Noah is given a week’s warning before the flood begins. The Hebrew word for “rain” in verse 4 is different than the word for “rain” in verse 12. That used inverse 12 designates a heavy downpour. The rain of verse 4 is no shower—it is to last forty days and forty nights. Noah does what God says (vv. 7–9) and God fulfills his word (v. 10).

As the flood starts (7:11–16), again we find the deliberate use of repetition and summarization. This is a characteristic of epic composition. Note: the flood (v. 6); entry into the ark (vv. 7–9); the flood (vv. 10–12); entry into the ark (vv. 13–16). Actually, there are two references to the flood’s beginning: verse 10 and verse 11. The additional data given in verse 11 are about the two sources of the rain: the springs of the great deep and the floodgates of heaven. But the following verse refers only to the second of these.


Elwell, Walter A. Evangelical Commentary on the Bible. Vol. 3. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 19…

Gadara Roman tomb interior

Gadara Roman tomb interior


Abel’s Faith

Abel’s Faith.

Excerpt


Abel represents the righteous man referred to in 10:38, whose acceptance before God was based on a superior sacrifice. Like Abel, the readers found acceptance before God on the basis of the better sacrifice of the New Covenant. Their unbelieving brethren, like Cain, found no such divine approbation. Even death does not extinguish the testimony of a man like Abel. More


Hodges, Zane C. “Hebrews.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 807. Print.

The Sinner’s Surrender to His Preserver

The Sinner’s Surrender to His Preserver

Excerpt


‎Job was one of those whom Scripture describes as “perfect,” yet he cried, “I have sinned.” Noah was perfect in his generation, but no drunkard will allow us to forget that he had his fault. Abraham received the command, “Walk before me and be thou perfect,” but he was not absolutely sinless. Zacharias and Elizabeth were blameless, and yet there was enough unbelief in Zacharias to make him dumb for nine months.

‎The doctrine of sinless perfection in the flesh is not of God, and he who makes his boast of possessing such perfection has at once declared his own ignorance of himself and of the law of the Lord. Nothing discovers an evil heart more surely than a glorying in its own goodness. He who proclaims his own praise reveals his own shame. …


Spurgeon, C. H. “The Sinner’s Surrender to His Preserver.” Sermon Outlines for Evangelistic Services. Ed. Al Bryant. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1992. 14. Print.

John the Baptist’s Final Testimony

John the Baptist’s Final Testimony


Excerpt


These verses, in placing the activities of Jesus and John alongside each other, provide the setting which will lead to the dialogue introducing John’s testimony. Jesus moves with his disciples from Jerusalem, where the conversation with Nicodemus has been set, into the Judaean countrysideand there he baptized. For those familiar with the Synoptic tradition, this description of Jesus’ activity would strike a surprising note, since nowhere in the Synoptics is Jesus said to have baptized. For the historical issues raised by such a statement and its later qualification in 4:2, see the discussion below after the comments on this pericope. John’s similar activity is next introduced. He also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because there was plenty of water there. John’s baptizing in Bethany on the other side of the Jordan was mentioned earlier in 1:25–8. Now he has moved north, leaving Jesus baptizing in the general area of the lower Jordan valley …

At Galilee

At Galilee ‎ Perhaps during that first week of the Resurrection there were other appearances of Christ which have gone unrecorded; but through them all there had run one command. The excitement and distraction of Jerusalem were unfitted for that quiet teaching and explanation which the risen Master had still to give; therefore He bade the apostles return to Galilee and there expect Him. They obeyed; they resumed in Galilee the ordinary occupations by which they had once earned their bread. Then one night when Peter and Thomas, and James and John, and some others had been fishing in vain, they returned in the morning toward the shore, outworn and disappointed. And there stood Jesus on the strand!
‎At first they did not know Him; but, even as He had done in the first early days, He bade them cast their nets again. A miraculous draft followed; and John cried to Peter, “It is the Lord.” Peter cast himself into the water, too eager to await the slower movement of the boat, and reached the…

Connect the Testaments

March 1: A Bold God and a Bold People
Numbers 1:1–46;John 11:1–27; Psalms 1:1–6

Imagine a God so bold that He would say, “Take a census of the entire community of the children of Israel according to their clans and their ancestors’ house … from twenty years old and above, everyone in Israel who is able to go to war. You and Aaron must muster them for their wars. A man from each tribe will be with you, each man the head of his family” (Num 1:2–4). It wouldn’t be easy to hear God tell you that you must be ready for war.

Yet our daily decisions to follow God are not so different than the decisions and preparations Moses had to make. Every day we have opportunities to choose God—or not. It’s easy to agree to this as a principle, but living it is an entirely different story. How often do distractions deter us from actually hearing God? Yet if we can’t hear Him, we can’t obey Him.

It’s also easy to be distracted by sin, but following sinful ways will only make us like “the chaff that the win…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 1      Go To Evening Reading
         “Awake, O north wind; and come, thou south; blow upon my garden, that the spices thereof may flow out.”   — Song of Solomon 4:16
Anything is better than the dead calm of indifference. Our souls may wisely desire the north wind of trouble if that alone can be sanctified to the drawing forth of the perfume of our graces. So long as it cannot be said, “The Lord was not in the wind,” we will not shrink from the most wintry blast that ever blew upon plants of grace. Did not the spouse in this verse humbly submit herself to the reproofs of her Beloved; only entreating him to send forth his grace in some form, and making no stipulation as to the peculiar manner in which it should come? Did she not, like ourselves, become so utterly weary of deadness and unholy calm that she sighed for any visitation which would brace her to action? Yet she desires the warm south wind of comfort, too, the smiles of divine love, the joy of the Redeemer’s pre…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 1st
The undeviating question


Lovest thou Me? John 21:17.

Peter declares nothing now (cf. Matthew 26:33–35 ). Natural individuality professes and declares; the love of the personality is only discovered by the hurt of the question of Jesus Christ. Peter loved Jesus in the way in which any natural man loves a good man. That is temperamental love; it may go deep into the individuality, but it does not touch the centre of the person. True love never professes anything. Jesus said—“Whosoever shall confess Me before men,” i.e., confess his love not merely by his words, but by everything he does.

Unless we get hurt right out of every deception about ourselves, the word of God is not having its way with us. The word of God hurts as no sin can ever hurt, because sin blunts feeling. The question of the Lord intensifies feeling, until to be hurt by Jesus is the most exquisite hurt conceivable. It hurts not only in the natural way but in the profound personal way. The word of the Lord pier…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 1

  Come up in the morning … and present thyself unto me in the top of the mount
  Exod. 34:2
The morning is the time fixed for my meeting the Lord. This very word morning is as a cluster of rich grapes. Let me crush them, and drink the sacred wine.

In the morning! Then God means me to be at my best in strength and hope. I have not to climb in my weakness. In the night I have buried yesterday’s fatigue, and in the morning I take a new lease of energy.

Sweet morning! There is hope in its music. Blessed is the day whose morning is sanctified! Successful is the day whose first victory was won in prayer! Holy is the day whose dawn finds thee on the top of the mount! Health is established in the morning. Wealth is won in the morning. The light is brightest in the morning. “Wake, psaltery and harp; I myself will awake early.”

Joseph Parker

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.