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Showing posts from March 2, 2016

Megiddo Early Bronze sacrificial altar

Megiddo Early Bronze sacrificial altar

Anne Bradstreet

Anne Bradstreet


Though she is today considered the first American poet, and though her poetry was admired by many contemporaries, she was criticized by some for writing poetry, as she once noted in a poem:
I am obnoxious to each carping tongue Who says my hand a needle better fits, A Poet’s pen all scorn I should thus wrong, For such despite they cast on Female wits.
Puritan passion Still she composed poems: about nature, about marriage, about children, about faith—sometimes all at once. As one historian put it, her poetry shows “a Puritan could … combine sexual passion, love of children and good furniture, humor—that the female Puritan, in short, could be both a Puritan and a woman of great charm.”
In “To My Dear and Loving Husband,” she celebrates marital love while pointing to a love more eternal:
If ever two were one, then surely we.       If ever man were loved by wife, then thee.       If ever wife was happy in a man,       Compare with me, ye women, if you can.       I prize th…

Cow and oaks of Bashan

Cow and oaks of Bashan
‎Cow and oaks of Bashan near Hippos

The Lord Tells Abram about Future Events

The Lord Tells Abram about Future Events

Excerpt


A deep sleep fell upon Abram; with this sleep a horror of great darkness fell upon him: a sudden change. The children of light do not always walk in the light. Several things were then foretold. 1. The suffering state of Abram’s seed for a long time. They shall be strangers. The heirs of heaven are strangers on earth. They shall be servants; but Canaanites serve under a curse, the Hebrews under a blessing. They shall be suffers. Those that are blessed and beloved of God, are often sorely afflicted by wicked men. 2. The judgment of the enemies of Abram’s seed. Though God may allow persecutors and oppressors to trample upon his people a great while, he will certainly reckon with them at last. 3. That great event, the deliverance of Abram’s seed out of Egypt, is here foretold. 4. Their happy settlement in Canaan. They shall come hither again. The measure of sin fills gradually. Some people’s measure of sin fills slowly. The knowledge of futu…

The True Nature of Love

The True Nature of Love

1 John 4:7–9

Excerpt


God has loved us in a way that has given us life. The atoning death of Jesus provides the means by which believers come into a life-giving realm where love is received and expressed (Jn 3:16). We do not simply gaze at the painting on the wall; we are touched by the hand of God and given life-giving love. And, third, because life and love come from God, it is God’s activity and not our own behavior and efforts that defines the essence of love.


Thompson, Marianne Meye. 1–3 John. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Warship

Warship
‎The 69-cm-high relief from the period of the Assyrian king Sennacherib (704–681 BCE) shows a vessel (galley) powered by banks of oarsmen used as a warship. Its bow was designed to ram and sink enemy vessels. The shields of the warriors hang on the ship’s side in order to protect the vessel. ‎Num 24:24; Judg 5:17; Job 9:26; Ps 104:26; Prov 30:19; Dan 11:30; 1 Macc 1:17; 11:1; 15:4

Hail and Fire

Hail and Fire

Connect the Testaments

March 2: The Power and the Glory
Numbers 1:47–2:34; John 11:28–57;Psalm 2:1–12

In our day-to-day life, we acknowledge God’s power and encourage others to believe in it. Yet sometimes it takes a trial for us to realize the extent and reality of our confession.

The disciples misunderstand Jesus’ reference to death and resurrection (John 11:11–12), so He displays His power through a trial and a miracle—the death and raising of Lazarus. Before Jesus has raised Lazarus, Mary and Martha express, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died” (John 11:21, 32). While their statement is a confession, it reveals their limited view of Jesus’ power. The crowd echoes Mary and Martha’s sentiment: “Was not this man who opened the eyes of the blind able to do something so that this man also would not have died?” (John 11:37). Yet, they don’t realize that Jesus has been planning for this moment to provide them with a chance to believe. (Of course, Jesus knows He could have come earlier; H…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 2      Go To Evening Reading
   “But all the Israelites went down to the Philistines, to sharpen every man his share, and his coulter, and his axe, and his mattock.”  — 1 Samuel 13:20
We are engaged in a great war with the Philistines of evil. Every weapon within our reach must be used. Preaching, teaching, praying, giving, all must be brought into action, and talents which have been thought too mean for service, must now be employed. Coulter, and axe, and mattock, may all be useful in slaying Philistines; rough tools may deal hard blows, and killing need not be elegantly done, so long as it is done effectually. Each moment of time, in season or out of season; each fragment of ability, educated or untutored; each opportunity, favourable or un favourable, must be used, for our foes are many and our force but slender.

Most of our tools want sharpening; we need quickness of perception, tact, energy, promptness, in a word, complete adaptation for the Lord’s work. Practical c…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 2nd
Have you felt the hurt of the Lord?


Jesus said unto him the third time, Lovest thou Me?John 21:17.

Have you felt the hurt of the Lord to the uncovered quick, the place where the real sensitiveness of your life is lodged? The devil never hurts there, neither sin nor human affection hurts there, nothing goes through to that place but the word of God. “Peter was grieved, because Jesus said unto him the third time.…” He was awakening to the fact that in the real true centre of his personal life he was devoted to Jesus, and he began to see what the patient questioning meant. There was not the slightest strand of delusion left in Peter’s mind, he never could be deluded again. There was no room for passionate utterance, no room for exhilaration or sentiment. It was a revelation to him to realize how much he did love the Lord, and with amazement he said—“Lord, Thou knowest all things.” Peter began to see how much he did love Jesus; but he did not say—‘Look at this or that to confir…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 2

  Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap
Gal. 6:7
The most common actions of life, its every day and hour, are invested with the highest grandeur, when we think how they extend their issues into eternity. Our hands are now sowing seeds for that great harvest. We shall meet again all we are doing and have done. The graves shall give up their dead, and from the tombs of oblivion the past shall give up all that it holds in keeping, to bear true witness for or against us.

Guthrie

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.