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Road from Beyrout to Damascus

Road from Beyrout to Damascus

‎This is a scene taken from the point between Damascus and the falls we have just left. We are looking toward a ridge of Anti-Lebanon that slopes down toward the city. The Beyrout road, which connects Damascus with the sea, is one of the finest bits of road-making in the world. It was built by a French company about forty years ago. It is macadamized and is kept in as good repair as any street in any American city. The road is seventy miles long, passing over the Lebanon Mountains, and the “diligence” goes from Damascus over this road to Beyrout every day. The trip is made in thirteen hours. The horses are changed thirteen times. In addition to the “diligence” there passes to and from Damascus every day a long train of covered wagons—a great freight train between Europe and Persia, Bagdad and Palmyra. The French Government had a contract with the Sultan of Turkey under which they controlled this road, but the contract expires within the next two years, a…

Basilica and Acropolis, Philippi

Basilica and Acropolis, Philippi

‎Partial walls of the fifth-century AD “Basilica B” (foreground) with Philippi Acropolis in background.

Siloam Tunnel

Siloam Tunnel

‎Even today one can still get through the 500 m long aqueduct that Hezekiah built underneath the City of David to divert the water of the Gihon Spring to the Pool of Siloam. ‎2 Kings 20:20; 2 Chron 32:30
The Siloam Tunnel, also known as Hezekiah's Tunnel, is a water tunnel that was dug underneath the City of David in Jerusalem in ancient times. Its popular name is due to the most common hypothesis of its origin, namely that it dates from the reign of Hezekiah of Judah and corresponds to the waterworks mentioned in 2 Kings 20:20 in the Bible. According to the Bible, King Hezekiah prepared Jerusalem for an impending siege by the Assyrians, by "blocking the source of the waters of the upper Gihon, and leading them straight down on the west to the City of David".
en.wikipedia.org · Text under CC-BY-SA license


Prison of Socrates, Athens

Prison of Socrates, Athens

Socrates belongs to the epoch immediately succeeding the age of Pericles, 469–399 B. C. Socrates was “the greatest spirit of the pagan world.” His contribution to the wisdom of mankind was greater than that of any other philosopher. He understood human nature, and he dealt with human nature in wisest fashion. His teachings can not fail to interest and instruct the seeker for truth in every age. He was a teacher. He taught without pay in portico, market-place and street, addressing all who chose to listen and addressing them in homely but pointed and effective style.
Notwithstanding his noble life, in B. C. 399 an open accusation was brought against him, and he was charged before the Athenian magistrates with not believing in the gods. Being condemned on these charges he was sentenced to drink a cup of hemlock. To weeping and affectionate disciples who gathered about him he delivered an address at the last on the immortality of the soul. On the northeast slop…

Section Outline One (Galatians 1)

Section Outline One (Galatians 1)

Galatians 1:2–5

Excerpt


I. Paul’s Greetings (1:2–5)

A. To the saints in Galatia (1:2) : Paul sends greetings from himself and the Christians he is with.

B. From the Savior in glory (1:3–5)

1. Who died to save us (1:3–4a)

2. Who lives to sanctify us (1:4b–5)


Willmington, H. L. The Outline Bible. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 1999. Print.

Trusting God’s Covenant

Trusting God’s Covenant

Excerpt


This is the first use of the word “covenant” in the Bible. The word appears often in Scripture because the covenant concept is an important part of God’s great plan of redemption. (God would explain His covenant to Noah after he left the ark; 8:20–9:17.) A covenant is an agreement that involves obligations and benefits for the parties involved. In some of the covenants, God alone is the “covenant party” and makes unconditional promises to His people. But there were also covenants that required His people to fulfill certain conditions before God could bless them.


Wiersbe, Warren W. Be Basic. Colorado Springs, CO: Chariot Victor Pub., 1998. Print. “Be” Commentary Series.

Bethsaida

Bethsaida

Excerpt


Same expression in 12:21 with the added words “of Galilee,” which locates it in Galilee, not in Iturea. There were two Bethsaidas, one called Bethsaida Julias in Iturea (that in Luke 9:10) or the Eastern Bethsaida, the other the Western Bethsaida in Galilee (Mark 6:45), perhaps somewhere near Capernaum. This is the town of Andrew and Peter and Philip. Hence Philip would be inclined to follow the example of his townsmen.


Robertson, A.T. Word Pictures in the New Testament. Nashville, TN: Broadman Press, 1933. Print.

Connect the Testaments

March 4: A Prayer for Guidance
Numbers 3:40–4:49; John 12:20–50; Psalm 5:1–12

When we feel downtrodden, it’s easy to lash out at those around us. Too often, caught in the injustice of our circumstances, we might begin to feel an unhealthy amount of self-justification. It’s difficult to see where the lines of right and wrong fall when anger and hurt overwhelm us.

The psalmist presents an alternative to this: turning to the God of justice for guidance, protection, and insight. Psalm 5 records a heartfelt cry. This cry is directed at the God who acts justly in a world where evil seems to win (something not always easy to comprehend). Before making a judgment, the psalmist says, “I will set forth my case to you and I will watch” (Psa 5:3). Rather than push forward with his own agenda, he calls out for God’s justice because Yahweh is “not a God who desires wickedness” (Psa 5:4).
The psalmist acknowledges God’s sovereignty and love, which is the basis for his confidence: “through the abundan…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 4      Go To Evening Reading
“My grace is sufficient for thee.”   — 2 Corinthians 12:9
If none of God’s saints were poor and tried, we should not know half so well the consolations of divine grace. When we find the wanderer who has not where to lay his head, who yet can say, “Still will I trust in the Lord;” when we see the pauper starving on bread and water, who still glories in Jesus; when we see the bereaved widow overwhelmed in affliction, and yet having faith in Christ, oh! what honour it reflects on the gospel. God’s grace is illustrated and magnified in the poverty and trials of believers. Saints bear up under every discouragement, believing that all things work together for their good, and that out of apparent evils a real blessing shall ultimately spring—that their God will either work a deliverance for them speedily, or most assuredly support them in the trouble, as long as he is pleased to keep them in it. This patience of the saints proves the power of divine…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 4th
Could this be true of me?


But none of these things move me, neither count I my life dear unto myself. Acts 20:24.
It is easier to serve God without a vision, easier to work for God without a call, because then you are not bothered by what God requires; common sense is your guide, veneered over with Christian sentiment. You will be more prosperous and successful, more leisure-hearted, if you never realize the call of God. But if once you receive a commission from Jesus Christ, the memory of what God wants will always come like a goad; you will no longer be able to work for Him on the commonsense basis.
What do I really count dear? If I have not been gripped by Jesus Christ, I will count service dear, time given to God dear, my life dear unto myself. Paul says he counted his life dear only in order that he might fulfil the ministry he had received; he refused to use his energy for any other thing. Acts 20:24 states Paul’s almost sublime annoyance at being asked to consider hi…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 4

  If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness
1 John 1:9
The same moment which brings the consciousness of sin ought to bring also the confession of it and the consciousness of forgiveness.

Smith

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.