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Showing posts from March 9, 2016

Tiberias: Horns of Hittin—Aerial View

Tiberias: Horns of Hittin—Aerial View
‎The Horns of Hittin. Seen from above, the road passes exactly between the two horns of the tel covering an ancient settlement in Lower Galilee, some 6 kilometers west of Tiberias. Here, remains were found of a fortress built inside the crater of an extinct volcano overlooking the Via Maris, the ancient Way of the Sea. The place is famous as the site of the fatal battle between the Crusaders and the Moslems, headed by Saladin, in 1187. The battle ended with the Crusaders’ defeat, and it symbolizes the fall of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem.

Hezekiah’s Tunnel

Hezekiah’s Tunnel

‎The tunnel was excavated approximately 40 meters beneath Ophel, the City of David, in Old Jerusalem during the reign of Hezekiah, King of Judea, around 710 BC. The tunnel was cut into over half a kilometer of bedrock with a 6 percent gradient designed to allow water to flow from the Gihon Spring into the Pool of Siloam.

Angelic Announcement

Angelic Announcement

Excerpt


As Zechariah offers up the incense and prayer, an angel appears. Angelic visitations to announce births of major figures are common in the Old Testament (Gen 16:10–11; 17:15–19; 18:10–15; 25:23; Judg 13:3–21). This announcement is unusual, however, in that the father rather than the mother receives the message. The angel’s arrival produces fear in the priest. He senses the presence of God’s agent (Lk1:29–30; 1:65; 2:9; 5:8–10, 26; 7:16; 8:37; 9:34) and is taken back by this surprising development.


Bock, Darrell L. Luke. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1994. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Portion of a Manuscript in Syriac

Portion of a Manuscript in Syriac

‎From a Photograph by Mrs. Lewis. ‎Found in the convent of Sinai in 1892 by Mrs. Lewis. ‎Luke 7:44–47

Egypt

Egypt

‎The River Nile with the Pyramids

Jacob Buries the Idols

Jacob Buries the Idols

‎Jacob was sorely upset by the sudden outbreak of his sons at Shechem. His reproof of them is characteristic in its shrewd worldly wisdom. He does not tell them they have done wrong, but that they have roused the country against them, that they will be looked on as a band of robbers, and be slain. About this time there seemed to come upon Jacob a sudden increase of religious devotion, perhaps from his wrestling with the angel, perhaps from his sense of multiplying dangers. To the end of his life, he remembered this outbreak of Simeon and Levi and blamed them bitterly. He also at this time aroused himself to the fact that Rachel and others of his household still worshiped the idols of Laban, and he forbade it firmly.
‎All idolatrous emblems and charms of every sort he took away from his people and buried under an oak tree or grove by the wayside. Then after gathering all his house in an act of solemn worship and acceptance of the One God, he hurried away from Sh…

The Ordering of Public Worship

The Ordering of Public Worship

Excerpt


This section, dealing with the importance of public worship and the conduct appropriating it, and the following chapter with its directions for the ministry, from the earliest manual of church order we possess. The necessity of clear regulations for congregational gatherings was speedily realized in the primitive Church, and as early as 1 Cor. 14 we find Paul concerned about the misunderstandings and disorder caused by the unsupervised exercise of ‘prophecy’ and ‘talking with tongues’, as well as by the eagerness of women to assert themselves at meetings. His golden rule was that whatever was done in the church should be done ‘decently and in order’ and should contribute to edification, i.e. building up the faithful (1 Cor. 14:40; 26).


Kelly, J. N. D. The Pastoral Epistles. London: Continuum, 1963. Print. Black’s New Testament Commentary.

Connect the Testaments

March 9: Profound and Confounding
Numbers 8–9;John 16:5–33; Psalm 9:8–20

God’s provision in our lives is often hard to see. There are times when we follow His commandments and we’re able to visibly see His work. Such times are profound to the believer but can be confounding to the unbeliever.

The ancients practiced remembering these events. They built memorials (usually a stack of stones) in places where God had shown Himself to them, such as when He offered them a covenant or gave them a revelation of some kind. They also had recurring holidays for remembering God’s providence in their lives. These types of traditions are nearly lost on us. Easter and Christmas are intended for this purpose, but they have become about something entirely different instead: bunnies and eggs, or a man with a red suit. Syncretism quietly sneaks into our lives, even though we would love to believe we would never let it happen.

In Numbers 9:1–14, we see God’s command that His people celebrate the day He sav…

Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, March 8      Go To Evening Reading
“We must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God.”     — Acts 14:22
God’s people have their trials. It was never designed by God, when he chose his people, that they should be an untried people. They were chosen in the furnace of affliction; they were never chosen to worldly peace and earthly joy. Freedom from sickness and the pains of mortality was never promised them; but when their Lord drew up the charter of privileges, he included chastisements amongst the things to which they should inevitably be heirs. Trials are a part of our lot; they were predestinated for us in Christ’s last legacy. So surely as the stars are fashioned by his hands, and their orbits fixed by him, so surely are our trials allotted to us: he has ordained their season and their place, their intensity and the effect they shall have upon us. Good men must never expect to escape troubles; if they do, they will be disappointed, for none of their predecesso…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 9th
The time of relapse


Will ye also go away? John 6:67.

A penetrating question. Our Lord’s words come home most when He talks in the most simple way. We know Who Jesus is, but in spite of that He says—“Will ye also go away?” We have to maintain a venturing attitude toward Him all the time.

“From that time, many of His disciples went back, and walked no more with Him.” They went back from walking with Jesus, not into sin, but they relapsed. Many today are spending and being spent in work for Jesus Christ, but they do not walk with Him. The one thing God keeps us to steadily is that we may be one with Jesus Christ. After sanctification, the discipline of our spiritual life is along this line. If God gives a clear and emphatic realization to your soul of what He wants, do not try to keep yourself in that relationship by any particular method, but live a natural life of absolute dependence on Jesus Christ. Never try to live the life with God on any other line than God’s line, and t…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 9

  When he cometh into the world, he saith … A body hast thou prepared me
Heb. 10:5
The word of Christ must be adopted by each of His followers. Nothing will help us to live in this world and keep ourselves unspotted but the Spirit that was in Christ, that looked upon His body as prepared by God for His service; that looks upon our body as prepared by Him too, that we might offer it to Him. Like Christ, we too have a body in which the Holy Spirit dwells. Like Christ, we too must yield our body, with every member, every power, every action, to fulfill His will, to be offered up to Him, to glorify Him. Like Christ, we must prove in our body that we are holy to the Lord.

Andrew Murray

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.