Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from March 18, 2016

Abraham Names the Location

Abraham Names the Location

Genesis 22:9

Excerpt


In naming the place, Abraham of course, was commemorating his own experience of sacrifice to the Lord. But an animal (a ram—not a lamb; cf. Gen.22:8—caught . . . its horns in a thornbush) was provided by God’s grace as a substitute for the lad in the offering (v. 13). Later all Israel would offer animals to the Lord. Worship involved accepting God’s sacrificial substitute. But of course in the New Testament, God substituted His only Son for the animal, and the perfect Sacrifice was made. John certainly had this in mind when he introduced Jesus as “the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (John1:29)

Yet the main point of Genesis 22:9-14 is not the doctrine of the Atonement. It is portraying an obedient servant worshiping God in faith at great cost, and in the end, receiving God’s provision. Abraham did not withhold his son. Similarly, Paul wrote that God “did not spare [epheisato] His own Son, but gave [delivered] Him up for us …

Upholding the Law

Upholding the Law

Excerpt


The Jew believed passionately that Paul’s teachings of grace and salvation by faith undermined Law and thus denied God’s O.T. revelation. Paul says that instead the Gospel upholds Law, but gives it the place God always intended it to have.


Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

The Feast of Passover

The Feast of Passover

Excerpt


The Passover was the major feast celebrated at the beginning of the Jewish year, Nisan 15, which falls in our month of March or April (Fitzmyer 1981:339–40). Only men were required to make the journey, so Mary’s presence shows her commitment (Preisker 1964:373). Jerusalem was eighty miles from Nazareth, so the trip would take three days. Though some have argued that women and children traveled separately from the men as a way to explain how Jesus got lost, there is no ancient text that describes this practice.


Bock, Darrell L. Luke. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1994. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Hebrews 1.4–14

Hebrews 1.4–14

Excerpt


Anointing with oil is associated in the Old Testament with happiness (compare Isa 61.3), and especially with the coronation of a king. Oil is not used in this way in most cultures, and a glossary note on “anoint” may be needed as in TEV.


Ellingworth, Paul, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on the Letter to the Hebrews. New York: United Bible Societies, 1994. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

House of the Lord

House of the Lord

Psalm 23:6

Excerpt


The house of the Lord is most probably a reference to the Temple. The meaning of the psalmist’s declaration is that he wants to worship Yahweh in the Temple all his life or, in an extended sense, always to experience Yahweh’s presence and power with him. Dahood, however, takes the house of the Lord to be Yahweh’s heavenly abode, in which the psalmist wants to live forever. The expression the house of the Lord may be the local designation of a church building. If that is the case, it will be better to speak of the Temple in Jerusalem.


Bratcher, Robert G., and William David Reyburn. A Translator’s Handbook on the Book of Psalms. New York: United Bible Societies, 1991. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

The Consolation of Israel

The Consolation of Israel

Luke 2:25

Excerpt


This refers to the consolation that would be brought about by the inauguration of the messianic age. Compare Luke 2:26, where this consolation is described as “seeing the Lord’s Christ” (cf. also 1:54, 68–75). For Luke, this referred not to the fulfillment of Jewish political hopes involving deliverance from their enemies and restoration of David’s throne but rather to the salvation Jesus brought. This is clear when one compares 2:30 with such verses as 19:10. See the discussion at 1:69. Like other devout model believers (Anna, 2:38; Joseph of Arimathea, 23:51; cf. also 12:36; Acts 24:15), Simeon was looking forward to Israel’s consolation (2:25), i.e., Jerusalem’s redemption (2:38); the coming of God’s kingdom (23:51); the Master’s return (12:36); the resurrection of the just and the unjust (Acts 24:15).


Stein, Robert H. Luke. Vol. 24. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1992. Print. The New American Commentary.

The Wilderness

The Wilderness

Exodus 3:1

Excerpt


The wilderness was not a wide, flat area of nothing but sand, as the word “desert” (3:1TEV) may imply. Rather it was a mostly dry and barren region through which Moses was leading the flock in search of seasonal pasturage. There would, however, be occasional patches of moisture and vegetation; but for the most part, it was uncultivated. Nomads and their herds inhabited certain areas of the wilderness. In cultures where a wilderness is unknown, one may translate the term with a descriptive phrase; for example, “a dry, barren land,” “a rocky region,” “a place where people don’t settle,” “a place where no house is,” and so on. Translators may prefer to borrow a term from a national language and explain it in a footnote.


Osborn, Noel D., and Howard A. Hatton. A Handbook on Exodus. New York: United Bible Societies, 1999. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Saul Receives David

Saul Receives David
‎ The head of Goliath was also brought to Saul, though whether after or before it had been displayed in Jerusalem, is not quite clear. The king in the extremity of his need had promised enormous rewards to the man who should conquer Goliath. The victor was to have great riches, his family were to be made free from all taxes or other obligation forever; and, quite in the style of ancient romance, he was to be wedded to the king’s daughter.
‎Immediately that the victory was achieved, King Saul, with his shrewd, practical mind, must have turned to the question of the promised payment. If David had already sung to him, the king had forgotten the affair; for he questioned eagerly as to who this strange youth might be who had appeared so suddenly among the soldiers and spoken so confidently of God’s aid. Nor could his closest associates tell him. Abner, the chief general and ever loyal servant of Saul, was sent to enquire. He found David, still with Goliath’s head, and …

Connect the Testaments

March 18: Is This “Bad” from God?
Numbers 20–21;1 Corinthians 3:1–4:21; Psalm 18:31–50

God has granted us incredible grace in the salvation that Jesus’ death and resurrection offers, but that very grace is often used as a theological excuse. It’s dangerous to say that bad things come from God, but there are times when they actually do. What makes them good is how He uses them to help us grow. The great grace God offers doesn’t mean our sins go unpunished.

We see God directly issue what seems “bad”in Num 21:5–7. First, we’re told: “The people spoke against God and against Moses, ‘Why have you brought us from Egypt to die in the desert? There is no food and no water, and our hearts detest this miserable food’ ” (Num 21:5). Then, Yahweh sends poisonous snakes that bite the people, causing them to die (Num 21:6). Why would a good God do such a horrific thing?

In Numbers 21:1–4, the people had experienced a miraculous victory against the Canaanites living in Arad—a people they were losing t…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 18      Go To Evening Reading
 “Ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus.”   — Galatians 3:26
The fatherhood of God is common to all his children. Ah! Little-faith, you have often said, “Oh that I had the courage of Great-heart, that I could wield his sword and be as valiant as he! But, alas, I stumble at every straw, and a shadow makes me afraid.” List thee, Little-faith. Great-heart is God’s child, and you are God’s child too; and Great-heart is not one whit more God’s child than you are. Peter and Paul, the highly- favoured apostles, were of the family of the Most High; and so are you also; the weak Christian is as much a child of God as the strong one.

 “This covenant stands secure,
         Though earth’s old pillars bow;
         The strong, the feeble, and the weak,
         Are one in Jesus now.”

All the names are in the same family register. One may have more grace than another, but God our heavenly Father has the same tender heart towards all. One ma…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 18th
Shall I rouse myself up to this?


Perfecting holiness in the fear of God. 2 Cor. 7:1.

“Having, therefore, these promises.” I claim the fulfillment of God’s promises, and rightly, but that is only the human side; the Divine side is that through the promises I recognize God’s claim on me. For instance, am I realizing that my body is the temple of the Holy Ghost, or have I a habit of a body that plainly will not bear the light of God on it? By sanctification the Son of God is formed in me, then I have to transform my natural life into a spiritual life by obedience to Him. God educates us down to the scruple. When He begins to check, do not confer with flesh and blood, cleanse yourself at once. Keep yourself cleansed in your daily walk.
I have to cleanse myself from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit until both are in accord with the nature of God. Is the mind of my spirit in perfect agreement with the life of the Son of God in me, or am I insubordinate in intellect? Am I fo…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 18

  They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary, and they shall walk, and not faint
Isa. 40:31
The eagle that soars in the upper air does not worry itself as to how it is to cross rivers.

Selected

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.