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Showing posts from April 6, 2016

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

January 8

  Take good heed therefore unto your souls
Josh. 23:11 (Margin)
Gold cannot be used for currency as long as it is mixed with the quartz and rock in which it lies embedded. So your soul is useless to God till taken out from sin and earthliness and selfishness, in which it lies buried. By the regenerating power of the Spirit, you must be separated unto Christ, stamped with His image and superscription, and made into a divine currency, which shall bear His likeness among men. The Christian is, so to speak, the circulating medium of Christ, the coin of the realm by whom the great transactions of mercy and grace to a lost world are carried on. As the currency stands for the gold, so does the Christian stand for Christ, representing His good and acceptable will.

A. J. Gordon

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Sea of Galilee and Golan Heights

Sea of Galilee and Golan Heights

In the Beginning...

In the Beginning...

Genesis 1:1

Excerpt


In the beginning refers to the time when God began to create. If the translator interprets this as a dependent clause, the opening clause may be translated, for example, “When God began to create,” “At the time when God began to create,” or “In the beginning of God’s creation.” If the traditional interpretation is followed, then the beginning refers to the time when the universe came into existence, rather than the beginning or opening of the story of creation.


Reyburn, William David, and Euan McG. Fry. A Handbook on Genesis. New York: United Bible Societies, 1998. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Egyptian Painters

Egyptian Painters

The King’s Birth

The King’s Birth
Matthew 1:1
Excerpt


‎Genealogies were very important to the Jews, for without them they could not prove their tribal memberships or their rights to inheritances. Anyone claiming to be “the Son of David” had to be able to prove it. It is generally concluded that Matthew gave our Lord’s family tree through His foster father, Joseph while Luke gave Mary’s lineage (Luke 3:23ff).

‎Many Bible readers skip over this list of ancient (and, in some cases, unpronounceable) names. But this “list of names” is a vital part of the Gospel record. It shows that Jesus Christ is a part of history; that all of Jewish history prepared the way for His birth. God in His providence ruled and overruled to accomplish His great purpose in bringing His Son into the world. …

Alexander the Great Statue, Istanbul

Alexander the Great Statue, Istanbul

‎Alexander the Great was a favorite subject of ancient sculptors, mosaicists, and other artists. This white marble statue of him, signed by the sculptor Menas, was excavated in Magnesia, an ancient Greek city in Anatolia, modern Turkey. It dates from the third century B.C. and now resides in the Istanbul Archeology Museum. ‎Dan 8:5–8, Dan 11:2–4, 1 Macc 1:1, 7, 1 Macc 6:2 ‎Image by user Tkbwikmed, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Public Domain

Monolith of Shalmaneser II., King of Assyria

Monolith of Shalmaneser II., King of Assyria

‎From a Photograph by Clarke and Davies. ‎B.C. 850. Now in the British Museum, No. 88. ‎His campaigns in Western Asia, 800 to 823 B.C., have a particular interest, for here we find the Assyrians first coming in contact with the Israelites.

Philippi

Philippi

‎The picture shows the ruins of the ancient city Philippi. Since it was located in the important trade route, the Via Egnatia, and was only 15 km away from the Sea, the city was of high agricultural significance. The city is named after Philip II of Macedon, the father of Alexander the Great. Paul visited the place on his second and third missionary journey.
‎Acts 16:12; 20:6; Phil 1:1; 4:15; 1 Thess 2:2

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

April 6

  They made me keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard have I not kept
Song of Sol. 1:6
Our attention is here drawn to a danger which is preeminently one of this day: the intense activity of our times may lead to zeal in service to the neglect of personal communion; but such neglect will not only lessen the value of the service but tend to incapacitate us for the highest service.

J. Hudson Taylor

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

My Utmost for His

April 6th
The collision of God and sin


Who His own self-bare our sins in His own body on the tree. 1 Peter 2:24.
The Cross of Jesus is the revelation of God’s judgment on sin. Never tolerate the idea of martyrdom about the Cross of Jesus Christ. The Cross was a superb triumph in which the foundations of hell were shaken. There is nothing more certain in Time or Eternity than what Jesus Christ did on the Cross: He switched the whole of the human race back into a right relationship with God. He made Redemption the basis of human life, that is, He made a way for every son of man to get into communion with God.

The Cross did not happen to Jesus: He came on purpose for it. He is “the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” The whole meaning of the Incarnation is the Cross. Beware of separating God manifest in the flesh from the Son becoming sin. The Incarnation was for the purpose of Redemption. God became incarnate for the purpose of putting away sin; not for the purpose of Self-re…

Morning and Evening

Morning, April 6      Go To Evening Reading
“Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp.”
— Hebrews 13:13
Jesus, bearing his cross, went forth to suffer without the gate. The Christian’s reason for leaving the camp of the world’s sin and religion is not because he loves to be singular, but because Jesus did so; and the disciple must follow his Master. Christ was “not of the world:” his life and his testimony were a constant protest against conformity with the world. Never was such overflowing affection for men as you find in him; but still he was separate from sinners. In like manner, Christ’s people must “go forth unto him.” They must take their position “without the camp,” as witness-bearers for the truth. They must be prepared to tread the straight and narrow path. They must have bold, unflinching, lion-like hearts, loving Christ first, and his truth next, and Christ and his truth beyond all the world. Jesus would have his people “go forth without the camp” for their own sa…

Connect the Testaments

April 6: A Letter of Recommendation
Deuteronomy 9:1–10:22; 2 Corinthians 3:1–8;Psalm 35:1–11

We file letters of recommendation from pastors, past supervisors, and teachers that highlight our skills, attitude, and work ethic. They present us as ideal candidates, glossing over the things we lack and the ways in which we’ve failed. But Paul’s letter of recommendation tells another story:
“You are our letter, inscribed on our hearts, known and read by all people, revealing that you are a letter of Christ, delivered by us, inscribed not with ink but with the Spirit of the living God, not on stone tablets but on tablets of human hearts” (2 Cor 3:2–3).

Paul saw the work God was doing in the lives of the Corinthians. Through the work of the Spirit, they were drawn together as a community. Their response to the gospel testified that Paul was fulfilling the task that he was called to do.

But Paul doesn’t stay focused on himself in this passage. He switches the focus to the Spirit: “Now we possess…

Connect the Testaments

January 7: A Time for Everything
Genesis 12–13, Matthew 10, Ecclesiastes 3:1–8

“For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven” (Eccl 3:1).

The Bible’s most famous poem has inspired writers for generations, yet has not been improved upon. In a few short, simple lines, the Preacher ponders the whole of life: birth, death, weeping, laughing, mourning, dancing, breaking down, and building up. The buoyancy and familiarity of the text could cause us to gloss over the poetic brilliance of “the matter[s] under heaven.” But when we get to “a time to hate” and “a time to kill,” the romance is—well, killed. Are all these emotions and events really ordained by God? The strength of the poem is in contrast and repetition. By laying the seasons side by side, the Preacher effectively captures the span and cycle of human life. He isn’t providing a list of experiences that we should check off our holistic life to-do list. Rather, he is emphasizing an absolute need for relianc…