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Showing posts from April 7, 2016

Caesarea Philippi

Caesarea Philippi
‎Caesarea Philippi lies on the slopes of Mt. Hermon in the outermost north of Israel. From the cave shown in the picture rises the Jordan River. The cave was originally connected to the Greek god Pan, and perhaps idols of Greek gods stood once in the niches. The son of Herod, Philip (4 BCE-34 CE), founded a village here. Also, several places of worship were built near the cave during the course of the 1st century CE.
‎Matt 16:13; Mark 8:27

Bethesda

Bethesda

Excerpt


Commonly interpreted House of Mercy; others House of the Portico. The readings also vary. Tischendorf and Westcott and Hort give Βηθζαθά,Bethzatha, House of the Olive. The site cannot be identified with any certainty. Dr. Robinson thinks it may be the Fountain of the Virgin, the upper fountain of Siloam. See Thomson’s “Land and Book,” “Southern Palestine and Jerusalem,” pp. 458–461.


Vincent, Marvin Richardson. Word Studies in the New Testament. Vol. 2. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887. Print.

The Greek Word for “Send”

The Greek Word for “Send”

John 3:17

Excerpt


[In the Gospel of John,] ἀποστέλλω denotes commissioning and authorization from God. The sending discloses the unique manner in which the Son is bound to the Father; a believing acknowledgment of the phrase “that you have sent me” therefore constitutes the goal and content of confession (11:42; 17:3, 8, 21, 23, 25). Along with ἀποστέλλω, there also appears the formula ὁ πέμψας με πατήρ.


Balz, Horst Robert, and Gerhard Schneider. Exegetical dictionary of the New Testament 1990– : 142. Print.

Canaan

Canaan

Excerpt


Though the land was God’s gift to Israel, it could be won only by hard fighting. The Lord gave them title to the territory but they had to possess it by marching on every part. The boundaries established by God and promised to Abraham (Gen. 15:18-21) and Moses (Deut. 1:6-8) were to extend from the wilderness on the south to the Lebanon mountain range on the north, and from the Euphrates River on the east to the Great Sea, the Mediterranean, on the west. The added expression, all the Hittite country, probably refers not to the extensive empire of that name north of Canaan but to the fact that in ancient times the whole population of Canaan or any part of it was sometimes called “Hittite” (cf. Gen. 15:20). “Pockets” of Hittite peoples existed here and there in Canaan.

Thirty-eight years earlier Joshua had explored this good and fruitful land as 1 of the 12 spies (Num. 13:1-16; there [Num. 13:8] he is called “Hoshea,” a variant spelling of his name). The memory of its beauty …

Diligence

Diligence

Excerpt


Verses 3-5 discuss diligence and sloth. Satisfaction of one’s appetite is related to the Lord (v. 3); poverty and wealth result from laziness and diligence, respectively (v. 4); industry characterizes a wise son and sleep a shameful son (v. 5). The righteous is literally, “the soul of the righteous.” Since “soul” emphasizes the whole person, God has said here that He meets all one’s needs, including the needs of his body for food (cf. Ps. 37:19, 25). The craving of the wicked refers to their evil desires to bring about destruction and disaster. God can keep them from carrying out such plans. Like many verses in Proverbs, this verse is a generalization. It is usually true that the godly do not starve and that the wicked do not get all they desire.


Buzzell, Sid S. “Proverbs.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 925. Print.

Frankincense Branch, Leaf, and Blossom

Frankincense Branch, Leaf, and Blossom

‎The Hebrew word meaning “frankincense,” from a root meaning “whiteness,”refers to the whitish-yellow sap and newly dried resin of three species of the tree genus Boswellia: B. sacra (or “carterii”), B. serrata (“thurifera), and B. papyrifera. These trees, related to terebinth, balsam, and myrrh, grow mainly in the southern Arabian Peninsula, Eastern and Sub-Saharan Africa, and India. This picture shows Boswellia sacra flowers and leaves. Incised Boswellia bark exudes glittering drops of bitter sap. The dried resin, when heated, emits fumes with a strong balsamic odor. ‎Exod 30:34, Lev 2:1–2, 15–16, Neh 13:5, 9, Song 3:6, Song 4:6, 14, Matt 2:11 ‎Image by Scott Zona, from Wikimedia Commons. License: CC BY 2.0

Jeremiah Honored by the Babylonians

Jeremiah Honored by the Babylonians

‎When the Babylonians stormed Jerusalem they found Jeremiah still confined within the prison court. At first, he was seized with the others and chained; but when the invaders knew who he was, they treated him with great honor, as well they might, for he was the one man who had most upheld their power in Jerusalem, the one who, having declared Nebuchadnezzar to be God’s destined instrument, had protested against opposing him.
‎Jerusalem itself was mercilessly ravaged. The city was burned, its chief buildings were torn stone from stone, thousands of its people slain in the streets; and all those of any importance who escaped the slaughter were carried off with King Zedekiah to be held captive in Babylon. Only a few hundred of the lowest and poorest of the inhabitants were allowed to remain among the smoking ruins. As for Jeremiah, he was bidden by Nebuchadnezzar’s captain to choose as he wished, whether to go with the army to Babylon there to receive…

Morning and Evening

Morning, January 7      Go To Evening Reading
“For me to live is Christ.”  — Philippians 1:21
The believer did not always live to Christ. He began to do so when God the Holy Spirit convinced him of sin, and when by grace he was brought to see the dying Saviour making a propitiation for his guilt. From the moment of the new and celestial birth the man begins to live to Christ. Jesus is to believers the one pearl of great price, for whom we are willing to part with all that we have. He has so completely won our love, that it beats alone for him; to his glory we would live, and in defence of his gospel we would die; he is the pattern of our life and the model after which we would sculpture our character. Paul’s words mean more than most men think; they imply that the aim and end of his life, Christ—nay, his life itself was Jesus. In the words of an ancient saint, he did eat, and drink, and sleep eternal life. Jesus was his very breath, the soul of his soul, the heart of his heart, the lif…

My Utmost for His Highest

January 7th
Intimate with Jesus


Have I been so long with you, and yet hast thou not known Me? John 14:9.
These words are not spoken as a rebuke, nor even with surprise; Jesus is leading Philip on. The last One with whom we get intimate is Jesus. Before Pentecost, the disciples knew Jesus as the One Who gave them all authority to conquer demons and to bring about a revival (see Luke 10:18–20 ). It was a wonderful intimacy, but there was a much closer intimacy to come—“I have called you friends.” Friendship is rare on earth. It means identity in thought and heart and spirit. The whole discipline of life is to enable us to enter into this closest relationship with Jesus Christ. We receive His blessings and know His word, but do we know Him?

Jesus said—“It is expedient for you that I go away”—in that relationship so that He might lead them on. It is a joy to Jesus when a disciple takes their time to step more intimately with Him. Fruit bearing is always mentioned as the manifestation of …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

January 7

  Now are ye light in the Lord; walk as children of light
Eph. 5:8
The influence we exert in the world is created by our relationship to, Jesus Christ; and our relationship to Jesus Christ is revealed by our influence.

Selected

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.