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Showing posts from April 20, 2016

Cappadocian Coin

Cappadocian Coin

‎This silver drachma, minted about 14 B.C., portrays King Archelaus of Cappadocia (obverse), a kingdom in modern central Turkey. His mother, Glaphyra, was a “hetaera” (“sophisticated courtesan”) involved with Roman co-ruler Marcus Antonius, whom she convinced to install her son as king in 36 B.C. Archelaus ruled until he died in A.D. 17. The Greek inscription on the coin’s reverse says “of King Archelaus, lover and founder of the country.” Many of the believers to whom Peter addressed his first epistle lived in Cappadocia (1 Pet 1:1). ‎Acts 2:9, 1 Pet 1:1

Fluted Columns, Pergamum’s Trajaneum

Fluted Columns Pergamum’s Trajaneum

‎These restored columns illustrate the opulence of the Trajaneum, the temple Emperor Hadrian built in Pergamum to proclaim the divinity of his deceased adoptive father, Emperor Trajan.

Lamps, Scissors, and Knife

Lamps, Scissors, and Knife
‎ When Paul had his hair cut in Cenchrea on completion of his vow, the barber probably used a pair of scissors like the Roman artifact in the upper left corner of this photograph. This type of scissors dates back at least until fifteenth-century B.C. Egypt. A pair with the same basic design was found in a fourteenth-century B.C. Amorite stratum in Emar (modern Tell Meskene), Syria. Ancient sheep-shearers also sometimes used shears like this. A Roman invented the first cross-blade scissors in about A.D. 100. ‎Song 4:2, Isa 53:7, Acts 18:18, 1 Cor 11:6 ‎Image by Giovanni Dall’Orto, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Free use, attribution required

Nazareth from Jezreel Valley

Nazareth from Jezreel Valley

Christian Symbol, Philippi

Christian Symbol, Philippi
‎A Christian symbol scratched in paving stone at Philippi—viewed as multiple crosses or a combination of all the Greek letters in “Ichthys,” a Greek acronym denoting “Jesus Christ, God’s Son, Savior.”

Assyrian Seal or Cylinder of Sennacherib

Assyrian Seal or Cylinder of Sennacherib

A Famine

A Famine

Excerpt


A famine occurred and the second son ran out of money so that he had to work for a foreigner feeding pigs, something detestable to a Jew. Perhaps the far country was east of the Sea of Galilee where Gentiles tended pigs (cf.8:26-37). In his hunger, he longed for the pods—the food he fed the pigs. As a Jew, he could have stooped no lower. The pods were probably carob pods, from tall evergreen carob trees.

In this low condition, he came to his senses (15:17). He decided to go back to his father and work for him. Surely he would be better off to work for his father than for a foreigner. He fully expected to be hired by his father as a servant, not to be taken back as his son.


Martin, John A. “Luke.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 245. Print.

Connect the Testaments

April 20: Be Generous to Consume?
Joshua 4:1–6:27; 2 Corinthians 9:6–15; Psalm 48

Our culture encourages us to absorb the latest and greatest, and then cast off our gently used devices. We are targeted to accumulate and consume. The new feature we learned about yesterday is now the one we can’t live without. At first, 2 Corinthians 9 seems to appeal to our consumer lifestyle: “The one who sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and the one who sows bountifully will also reap bountifully” (2 Cor 9:6).

This verse has often been used to encourage giving, because then, God will provide us with even more. But should we give more for the sake of consuming more? Should this be our motivation for generosity?

Paul debunks this idea in the next verse: “Each one should give as he has decided in his heart, not reluctantly or from compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver” (2 Cor 9:7). Certainly God will provide for those who give; He takes care of those who follow Him. But our willingness to giv…

Morning and Evening

Morning, April 20      Go To Evening Reading
 “That through death he might destroy him that had the power of death.”  — Hebrews 2:14
O child of God, death hath lost its sting, because the devil’s power over it means destroyed. Then cease to fear in dying. Ask grace from God the Holy Ghost, that by an intimate knowledge and a firm belief of thy Redeemer’s death, thou mayst be strengthened for that dread hour. Living near the cross of Calvary thou mayst think of death with pleasure, and welcome it when it comes with intense delight. It is sweet to die in the Lord: it is a covenant-blessing to sleep in Jesus. Death is no longer banishment; it is a return from exile, a going home to the many mansions where the loved ones already dwell. The distance between glorified spirits in heaven and militant saints on earth seems great; but it is not so. We are not far from home—a moment will bring us there. The sail is spread; the soul is speared upon the underground. How long will be its voyage? How…