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Showing posts from April 21, 2016

Dead Sea: Health Resorts

Dead Sea: Health Resorts

Along the shores of the Dead Sea, there are many sulphur springs, including hot springs, around which some of the world’s best-known health resorts have developed. It is a pleasurable experience to bathe in the water in which “it is impossible to drown”, and no less pleasurable to sit on the “tongue” of dry land that extends into the turquoise water. The air strata above this low area effectively filter the sun’s rays, so there is less danger of sunburn here than on other beaches. Nevertheless, during the hot hours, it’s wise to hide from the sun’s long rays under a large sunshade.

Bears Destroy the Children that Mocked Elisha

Bears Destroy the Children that Mocked Elisha

‎And he went up from thence unto Bethel: and as he was going up, by the way, there came forth little children out of the city, and mocked him, and said unto him, Go up, thou bald head; go up, thou bald head. ‎2 Kings 2:23

Love Your Wives

Love Your Wives

Excerpt


Present active imperative, “keep on loving.” That is precisely the point. Be not bitter (μη πικραινεσθε [mē pikrainesthe]). Present middle imperative in prohibition: “Stop being bitter” or “do not have the habit of being bitter.” This is the sin of husbands. Πικραινω [Pikrainō] is an old verb from πικρος [pikros] (bitter). In N.T. only here and Rev. 8:11; 10:9f. The bitter word rankles in the soul.


Robertson, A.T. Word Pictures in the New Testament. Nashville, TN: Broadman Press, 1933. Print.

Ephesians 1:3-14 in Overview

Ephesians 1:3-14 in Overview

Ephesians 1:3–14

Excerpt


This grand expression is made up of three sections (1:3–6, 7–12, 13–14). The first proclaims the believers’ being chosen by God for “sonship” (1:3–6). The second describes the believers’ redemption (1:7–12). The third affirms the believers’ present pledge of the Spirit for future hope (1:13–14). Each section ends with “praise our glorious God.” Christ, the Son, is the central link in the praise to the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The spiritual blessings (1:3) stem from the believers’ father/child relationship with God (1:5) and their resultant inheritance (1:11, 14). More


Hughes, Robert B., and J. Carl Laney. Tyndale Concise Bible Commentary. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2001. Print. The Tyndale Reference Library.

Judas and the Priests

Judas and the Priests

‎What Jesus foresaw and knew, was the hideous act of treachery which was about to be perpetrated against Him. From the very first He had told His apostles that even among them, the twelve chosen from all men as truest and best, “one of you is a devil.” This one was Judas Iscariot, a man more cautious and careful than all the rest, so much so that he had been selected to carry their common purse, and pay out moneys for them.
‎To Judas, Mary’s measureless extravagance with the ointment of spikenard seemed unpardonable; he cried out that the oil was worth “three hundred pence” and should have been turned into money for the poor. The Gospel of John declares bitterly that he spake “not that he cared for the poor,” but because he was “a thief” and wanted the money himself. At all of the events, a sudden impulse seemed in that moment to overwhelm Judas. Perhaps in very fact, he became temporarily “a devil.” Rising from his seat at the feast, he went forth into the nigh…

Robinson's Arch

Robinson's Arch
Robinson's Arch is the name given to a monumental staircase carried by an unusually wide stone arch, which once stood at the southwestern corner of the Temple Mount. It was built as part of the expansion of the Second Temple initiated by Herod the Great at the end of the 1st century BCE. Recent findings suggest that it may not have been completed until at least 20 years after his death. The massive stone span was constructed along with the retaining walls of the Temple Mount. It carried traffic up from ancient Jerusalem's Lower Market area and over the Tyropoeon street to the Royal Stoa complex on the esplanade of the Mount. The overpass was destroyed during the Great Jewish Revolt, only a few decades after its completion.

Paul’s Experience Explained (3:1–16)

Paul’s Experience Explained (Colossians 3:1–16)

Excerpt


Some commentators suggest that in this section Paul addressed his opponents. They say that he consciously countered a perfectionistic group, sometimes called “divine men,” who claimed their own completeness. Others suggest that Paul produced this section because the Jewish opponents of 3:2taught that perfection could be achieved by keeping the law. Still others see Paul continuing the logic of 3:4–11, issuing a warning because of a tendency to misunderstand his teaching. His introduction of 3:15 with the words “all of us who are mature,” (lit., “perfect”), however, suggests that there may have been some irony in his tone. The context does not require an opponent, and it is unlikely that he envisioned one. A group within the church may have misunderstood his teaching on justification and taken it to their own “logical” conclusions, which were theologically unacceptable. More


Melick, Richard R. Philippians, Colossians, Philemon. Vol. …

David Rescues Israel from a Philistine Giant

David Rescues Israel from a Philistine Giant

Excerpt


We cannot know how soon the events of this chapter occurred after the previous events. However, enough time must have passed for Saul to have changed his policy toward David, permitting him to return to Bethlehem. It also may have been long enough for the youthful David to mature and change significantly in appearance, though not long enough for David to have become old enough for military service (=age twenty; cf. Num 1:3; also 1 Sam 17:33). More


Bergen, Robert D. 1, 2 Samuel. Vol. 7. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1996. Print. The New American Commentary.

City complex

City complex

‎In the Iron Age, most Palestinian cities were protected by city walls. On the inside of the wall, the roads sometimes proceeded parallel to the wall and provided access to every house. The individual houses normally consisted of a courtyard, as well as of rooms and stables on three sides (separated by posts). The courtyard was the common workplace and secured light for the rooms. In the summer months, the flat-roofed houses were used as sleeping place, but also for drying flax, grapes, etc. ‎Roof: Deut 22:8; Josh 2:6; 1 Sam 9:25; 2 Sam 11:2; 16:22; 2 Kings 19:26; Prov 21:9; Isa 22:1; Matt 10:27; Mark 2:4; Acts 10:9 ‎Street/Lane: Song 3:2; Isa 15:3; 42:2; Jer 5:1; 7:17; 11:13; 14:16; Nah 2:4; Acts 12:10

Reef Palace Pillars, Caesarea

Reef Palace Pillars, Caesarea
‎Pillars in Herod the Great’s “Reef” or “Promontory Palace” complex, probably the site of Paul’s hearing and trial (Acts 25:1–26:32).

Morning and Evening

Morning and Evening







Morning, April 21      Go To Evening Reading
 “I know that my Redeemer liveth.” — Job 19:25
The marrow of Job’s comfort lies in that little word “My”“My Redeemer,” and in the fact that the Redeemer lives. Oh! to get hold of a living Christ. We must get a property in him before we can enjoy him. What is gold in the mine to me? Men are beggars in Peru, and beg their bread in California. It is gold in my purse which will satisfy my necessities, by purchasing the bread I need. So a Redeemer who does not redeem me, an avenger who will never stand up for my blood, of what avail was such? Rest not content until by faith you can say “Yes, I cast myself upon my living Lord; and he is mine.” It may be you hold him with a feeble hand; you half think it presumption to say, “He lives as my Redeemer;” yet, remember if you have but faith as a grain of mustard seed, that little faith entitles you to say it. But there is also another word here, expressive of Job’s strong confidence…

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan




April 21: The Misnomer about God’s Will Joshua 7:1–8:35; 2 Corinthians 10:1–8; Psalm 49:1–20
We often hear a great misnomer about following God’s will. It usually sounds something like this: “God has commanded me to do x, so I’m going to go into x blindly without fear.” A phrase like this has elements of great truth—faith should carry us. But it’s missing a piece.
Sometimes God instructs us to follow Him quickly and blindly. When that’s the case, we should certainly do it. However, His commands should almost always be combined with the abilities that He has given us, including logic and rationality. We have to find the balance. If we get too rational, it can be the detriment of God’s will; we can reason ourselves out of taking the risks God wants us to take.
Joshua, the leader of the Israelites after Moses, is a great example of proper behavior within God’s will. He learned from Moses and led out of that streng…