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Showing posts from April 25, 2016

Shepherd with his flock

Shepherd with his flock
‎In the Near East, the Shepherd—since the 3rd millennium BCE—is a symbol for the king who, as god’s representative on earth, is supposed to lead his people like a shepherd his flock. In the Bible, this symbol is also applied to the king (sometimes critically), to God, and finally to Jesus. Later the leaders of the Christian congregations also were called shepherds. ‎Ps 23:title–1; 80:1; Isa 40:11; 44:28; Jer 2:8; 3:15; 12:10; 23:1, 23:4; 31:10; 50:6; Ezek 34:2–23; John 10:2, 10:11, 10:14; Eph 4:11; 1 Pet 2:25

Faithful

Faithful

Excerpt


“Faithful”. (4:17, cf. v. 2). Here Paul commends Timothy, his young companion in ministry, as “faithful.” The word, pistos, means loyal, reliable, and trustworthy. It is frequently used in the N.T. to commend believers for carrying out their assignments (Matt. 24:45; 25:21–23), and for steadfast endurance (Eph. 6:21; Col. 1:7; 4:7).

Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Damascus

Damascus

Acts 9:2, 3, 8, 10

Excerpt


Damascus, one of the oldest continuously inhabited sites is known to archaeologists, figured long and often in biblical awareness. It was a reference place for Abraham’s rescue of his kinsmen (Gen.14:15). David brought it within Israelite control (2 Sam.8:5-6), but during Solomon’s reign, the first of a series of Aramaean kings made Damascus his capital city, continuing to intervene in the life of Israel and Judah until the Assyrian conquest in 732 b.c. In this series of local dynastic politics, biblical traces occur of the founder Rezon (1 Kings11:23-25); Tabrimmon, ally of the Judean Abijam against Israel (1 Kings15:19); his father Hezion (same verse); his son Ben-hadad (I, 900-875 b.c.), who was allied with Baasha of Israel, but later with Asa of Judah (1 Kings 15:18-19); Ben-hadad II (1 Kings20) and his son Hadadezer who fought Ahab of Israel; and Ben-hadad III who was killed by Hazael (843-797 b.c.; 2 Kings8:7-15) who then succeeded him. The deepe…

Sea of Galilee

Sea of Galilee

‎After making himself known at Emmaus, Jesus appeared to ten of the apostles at Jerusalem, and later to eleven of the apostles when He rebuked Thomas for his lack of faith—a rebuke of love. He afterwards stood by the Sea of Galilee and gave to Peter the threefold commission after having elicited from Peter his threefold confession of love. It is here that, after a night of profitless attempt, the nets were filled with the fishes. As the Dead Sea is girdled by an almost constant hedge of driftwood, so the Sea of Galilee is girdled by a scarcely less continuous belt of ruins—the drift of her ancient towns. In the time of our Lord, she must have mirrored within the outline of her guardian hills little else than city walls, castles, and synagogues. Greek architecture hung its magnificence over her simple life; Herod’s castle, temple and theatres in Tiberias; the warm baths; the high-stacked houses of Gamala; the amphitheatre of Gadara with the acropolis above it; the paved…

Nahal Gerar from Ziklag

Nahal Gerar from Ziklag



Brothers and Kinsmen

Brothers and Kinsmen

Excerpt


In v. 3 Paul calls his fellow Jews his brothers as well as his kin according to the flesh. Here “brother” is used not in the spiritual sense of fellow Christian, nor in the literal sense of a member of Paul’s own physical or extended family unless one includes all Jews as his extended family. In v. 4 he describes them as “Israelites,” indicating something of their spiritual nature as God’s chosen people. He is probably already setting up the argument which is to follow because he wants to maintain that God has not rejected non-Christian Jews as no longer part of Israel. Indeed, the term Israel is going to be used in11:26 to refer quite specifically to non-Christian Jews. But Paul will go on to say in v. 6 that not all those who are from Israel are Israel. He does not use the qualifier “true” Israel, and it is probably not appropriate to bring it into the discussion. He is saying that the term “Israel” does not apply to some Jews. He will use the righteous re…

Dam, Abana River

Dam, Abana River
‎Here we have another of the crude dams built by the natives for the purpose of turning part of the Abana River into some other channel to water some other part of the plain of Damascus. This view is taken from the Beyrout road. We are looking toward the north. We see groups of slender poplar trees to the right of the picture with a spur of the Anti-Lebanon rising beyond them. The Nile is said to be larger at its source than at its mouth because the waters of the Nile are diverted from the main stream for the purpose of irrigation so that it becomes smaller and smaller as it extends toward the sea. The same is true of the Abana. The artificial canals which are cut at different places along its banks to water the country round about make constant levies upon its waters. The largest canal leaving the Abana is from above Damascus. It runs along the hills northward and is said to pass Tadmor in the wilderness. This channel is seven feet wide and three feet deep. The seco…

Morning and Evening

Morning, April 25      Go To Evening Reading
 “Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away.”   — Song of Solomon 2:10
Lo, I hear the voice of my Beloved! He speaks to me! Fair weather is smiling upon the face of the earth, and he would not have me spiritually asleep while nature is all around me awaking from her winter’s rest. He bids me “Rise up,” and well he may, for I have long enough been lying among the pots of worldliness. He is risen, I am risen in him, why then should I cleave unto the dust? From lower loves, desires, pursuits, and aspirations, I would rise towards him. He calls me by the sweet title of “My love,” and counts me fair; this is a good argument for my rising. If he has thus exalted me and thinks me thus comely, how can I linger in the tents of Kedar and find congenial associates among the sons of men? He bids me “Come away.” Further and further from everything selfish, grovelling, worldly, sinful, he calls me; yea, from the outwardly religious world which knows h…

Connect the Testaments

April 25: Bound for the Promised Land
Joshua 14:1–15:63; 2 Corinthians 11:16–23; Psalm 54:1–7

Faith is not just about being faithful; it’s also about trusting in God’s faithfulness.

For years, God dealt with the confused and waning nature of His people while they were in the wilderness. They wondered, “Will God actually do what Moses has told us?” They had seen God repeatedly act on their behalf, but they continued to grow frightened and faithless. In return, the first generation that left Egypt never saw the promises of God. Instead, a later generation witnessed His faithfulness.

In Joshua 14:1–15:63, we see God fulfilling His words. Caleb and Joshua get a chance to witness this faithfulness, but the Hebrews who doubted that God would act on their behalf did not (Josh 14:6–15; also seeNum 13:25–14:45). This is an incredible moment: these two men had watched the failures of their elders and led their peers and people younger than them so that they could witness the faithfulness of God …

My Utmost for His Highest

April 25th
Instant in season


Be instant in season, out of season. 2 Tim. 4:2.

Many of us suffer from the morbid tendency to be instant “out of season.” The season does not refer to time, but to us. “Be instant in season, out of season,” whether we feel like it or not. If we do only what we feel inclined to do, some of us would do nothing for ever and ever. There are unemployable's in the spiritual domain, spiritually decrepit people, who refuse to do anything unless they are supernaturally inspired. The proof that we are rightly related to God is that we do our best whether we feel inspired or not.

One of the great snares of the Christian worker is to make a fetish of his rare moments. When the spirit of God gives you a time of inspiration and insight, you say—‘Now I will always be like this for God.’ No, you will not, God will take care you are not. Those times are the gift of God entirely. You cannot give them to yourself when you choose. If you say you will only be at your bes…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

April 25

  I the Lord thy God will hold thy right hand, saying unto thee, Fear not; I will help thee
Isa. 41:13
Don’t try to hold God’s hand; let Him hold yours. Let Him do the holding, and you do the trusting.

H. W. Webb-Peploe

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.