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Showing posts from April 29, 2016

Gecko Sunning Itself

Gecko Sunning Itself

‎The Mediterranean House Gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus, also called the Turkish Gecko, is a nocturnal lizard inhabiting the Mediterranean Basin and surrounding areas. Rarely growing longer than six inches (15 cm), they have large, lidless eyes with elliptical pupils. The skin of the head and upper body exhibits dark spots over a yellow or tan base, and the tail usually features dark stripes. Geckos emit a high-pitched call that sounds like a bird chirping. Though dietarily unclean in the Mosaic Law, they have adapted well to living around humans. ‎Lev 11:30, Prov 30:28 ‎Image by user ZooFari, from Wikimedia Commons. License: CC BY-SA 3.0

A Silver Shekel

A Silver Shekel
‎Rome operated a mint in Tyre that produced silver shekels of high purity (94 percent silver or more). These and half-shekels were the only coins accepted by the temple in Jerusalem. The high priests paid Judas with silver shekels like this one to betray Christ (Matt 26:15). This was also the coin Jesus told Peter to find in the fish’s mouth (Matt 17:27).


Jacob Meets Rachel

Jacob Meets Rachel

‎So Jacob came to Haran; and he paused, even as Eliezer had paused by a well outside the city. But this was a well farther away among the fields, where shepherds watered their flocks. He inquired for his mother’s people; and the shepherds pointed to where Rachel was coming with her flock to the well. Jacob with his usual craft hurried the shepherds away so that he remained alone, to help Rachel water her sheep and then tell her who he was. She welcomed him gladly with a kiss and ran to tell her father. ‎This father was Laban, the brother of Rebekah, who had given the latter to be Isaac’s wife. Laban was a man of Jacob’s own type, well-meaning perhaps at heart, and bold where needed, but full of guile and trickery. The two men were not ill-matched. At first, Laban had all the advantage of their intercourse; for Jacob was after all but an ignorant country lad, and besides he had fallen at first sight deeply in love with Rachel. The purest, noblest, strongest sentimen…

Old City View from Mt of Olives

Old City View from Mt of Olives

Tomb of Lazarus

Tomb of Lazarus

‎Tradition locates the site of this celebrated event in the sepulchre to which we here see the opening. It is, of course, nothing but a tradition. The tomb is partly cut out of the rock and partly lined with masonry. It is sacred both to Christians and Moslems alike, and the strong probability is that the tomb is not very far away. There is something very impressive in the thought that it was here, within the sound of our voices, that Lazarus and Mary and Martha lived; the Mary who anointed the Lord with ointment and wiped His feet with her hair. When Lazarus was taken sick his sister sent to Jesus with the simple message: “Lord, behold, he whom Thou lovest is sick. When Jesus heard that, He said, This sickness is not unto death, but for the glory of God, that the Son of God might be glorified thereby. Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.” It was four days after the burial of Lazarus before Jesus reached Bethany, and it was at the grave that He groaned i…

Adoption

Adoption

Romans 8:15

Excerpt


Among the Greeks and Romans, when a man had no son, he was permitted to adopt one even though not related. He might, if he chose, adopt one of his slaves as a son. The adopted son took the name of the father and was in every respect regarded and treated as a son. Among the Romans, there were two parts to the act of adoption: one a private arrangement between the parties, and the other a formal public declaration of the fact. It is thought by some that the former is referred to in this verse, and the latter in verse 23, where the apostle speaks of “waiting for the adoption.” The servant has been adopted privately, but he is waiting for a formal public declaration of the fact.

‎After adoption, the son, no longer a slave, had the privilege of addressing his former master by the title of “father.”


Freeman, James M., and Harold J. Chadwick. Manners & Customs of the Bible. North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers, 1998. Print.

Tents

Tents

Song of Solomon 1:5

Excerpt


‎Tents were among the early habitations of man, though not the earliest since they apparently were not introduced until the time of Jabal, who was in the seventh generation from Adam (see Genesis 4:20). The first tents were doubtless made of skins, though afterward when the process of weaving became known, they were made of cloth of camel’s hair, or goat’s hair, spun by women. The latter is the material most commonly used by the Arabs, and since the goats were usually black, or a very dark brown, the tents had the same appearance. It was thus in the days of Solomon with the tents made the descendants of the Ishmaelitish Kedar. “Kedar,” which means “powerful” in Arabic and “black” in Hebrew, designates the descendants of Ishmael in North Arabia. …


Freeman, James M., and Harold J. Chadwick. Manners & Customs of the Bible. North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers, 1998. Print.

The Joy of the Lord

The Joy of the Lord

Excerpt


The state of the blessed is a state of joy, not only because all tears shall then be wiped away, but all the springs of comfort shall be opened to them, and the fountains of joy broken up. Where there are the vision and fruition of God, a perfection of holiness, and the society of the blessed, there cannot but be a fulness of joy. (2.) This joy is the joy of their Lord; the joy which he himself has purchased and provided for them; the joy of the redeemed, bought with the sorrow of the Redeemer. It is the joy which he himself is in the possession of, and which he had his eye upon when he endured the cross and despised the shame, Heb. 12:2. It is the joy of which he himself is the fountain and center. It is the joy of our Lord, for it is joy in the Lord, who is our exceeding joy. Abraham was not willing that the steward of his house, though faithful, should be his heir (Gen. 15:3); but Christ admits his faithful stewards into his own joy, to be joint-heirs with…

Connect the Testaments

April 29: Examine Thy Self
Joshua 21:1–22:9; 2 Corinthians 13:1–10; Psalm 59:1–17

Before advising others on how they should act, self-examination is always necessary. When the Corinthians questioned the authenticity of Paul and his colleagues’ ministry (which is ironic, since he had planted their church), Paul says to them: “Test yourselves to see if you are in the faith. Examine yourselves! Or do you not recognize regarding yourselves that Jesus Christ is to you unless you are unqualified?” (2 Cor 13:5).

None of us are ready for the ministry that Jesus has for us because we’re not worthy of the godly gift of salvation He has offered. We are meant to find our identity and calling in Christ; and to lead out of the gifts; He has given us (see 1 Cor 12). For this reason, Paul makes this claim:

“And I hope that you will recognize that we are not unqualified! Now we pray to God that you do not do wrong in any way, not that we are seen as approved, but that you do what is good, even though we…

Morning and Evening

Morning, April 29      Go To Evening Reading
   “Thou art my hope in the day of evil.” — Jeremiah 17:17
The path of the Christian is not always bright with sunshine; he has his seasons of darkness and of storm. True, it is written in God’s Word, “Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace;” and it is a great truth, that religion is calculated to give a man happiness below as well as bliss above; but experience tells us that if the course of the just be “As the shining light that shineth more and more unto the perfect day,” yet sometimes that light is eclipsed. At certain periods clouds cover the believer’s sun, and he walks in darkness and sees no light. There are many who have rejoiced in the presence of God for a season; they have basked in the sunshine in the earlier stages of their Christian career; they have walked along the “green pastures” by the side of the “still waters,” but suddenly they find the glorious sky is clouded; instead of the Land of Goshen they…

My Utmost for His Highest

April 29th
The graciousness of uncertainty


It doth not yet appear what we shall be. 1 John 3:2.

Naturally, we are inclined to be so mathematical and calculating that we look upon uncertainty as a bad thing. We imagine that we have to reach some end, but that is not the nature of spiritual life. The nature of spiritual life is that we are certain in our uncertainty, consequently, we do not make our nests anywhere. Common sense says—‘Well, supposing I were in that condition …’ We cannot suppose ourselves in any condition we have never been in.

Certainty is the mark of the commonsense life: gracious uncertainty is the mark of the spiritual life. To be certain of God means that we are uncertain in all our ways, we do not know what a day may bring forth. This is generally said with a sigh of sadness; it should be rather an expression of breathless expectation. We are uncertain of the next step, but we are certain of God. Immediately we abandon to God and do the duty that lies nearest, He …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

April 29

  Thou shalt know that I am the Lord: for they shall not be ashamed that wait for me
Isa. 49:23
Quiet waiting before God would save from many a mistake and from many a sorrow.

J. Hudson Taylor

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.