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A Fence at Dothan

A Fence at Dothan

‎The thorny cactus abounds in Palestine. It forms a most secure fence, growing sometimes to a height of twelve feet. Beyond this wall are fig trees and olive trees, pleasant vines and fragrant flowers. The man in the picture with a white headdress and staff held behind him is the dragoman of the photographic company of 1894. We linger at Dothan because, besides the memories of Joseph and his brethren, there is an Old Testament picture which must have been recalled by Mary on her pilgrimage to Bethlehem. The prophet Elisha lived here for a time, and it was to Dothan that the Syrian King sent an army to surround and to capture him. By night, they came—“horses and chariots and a great host.” And they “compassed the city.” In the early morning, when Elisha’s servant arose from his bed and went forth, “behold, a host compassed the city both with horses and chariots.” Then the prophet’s servant was afraid and he said: “Alas, my master; how shall we do?” And the prophet an…

Gold amulets

Gold amulets

‎People liked to wear pendants made of gold or other metal as jewelry. They frequently depicted symbols of gods, like a crescent for representing the moon god (Acadian: Sin), or a star representing an astral deity; thus, the pendants had the character of an amulet. ‎Gen 35:4

Assyrian Bracelets

Assyrian Bracelets




Christian Symbol, Philippi

Christian Symbol, Philippi

‎A Christian symbol scratched in paving stone at Philippi—viewed as multiple crosses or a combination of all the Greek letters in “Ichthys,” a Greek acronym denoting “Jesus Christ, God’s Son, Savior.”

Site of Joseph’s Work Shop

Site of Joseph’s Work Shop
‎ The most massive structure in the little town of Nazareth is the Latin Monastery. A little to the northeast of this building is the traditional House or Work Shop of Joseph. The Franciscans gained possession of this spot about the middle of the last century. It is hardly worth while to describe the modern chapel, built in 1859, for it lacks the flavor of antiquity, but this we know that in this little town Jesus grew up from infancy to youth. Here he, too, spent the years of his ripening manhood in humble labor. It was his home, a home of trustful piety, of purity and of peace. This we may believe with Joseph to guide, with Mary to hallow and sweeten it, and with Jesus to illuminate it with the very light of heaven. When Joseph returned to Nazareth, to the calm, untroubled seclusion of that happy valley, he knew that the life of the Virgin and of the Holy Child would be spent with him in honest poverty and in manual toil. One writer says: “We may safely i…

The Emperor Was Supreme

The Emperor Was Supreme

Excerpt


The Roman emperor was “supreme” in the Roman provinces to which this Epistle was addressed. The Jewish zealots refused obedience. The distinction between “the king as supreme” and “governors sent by him” implies that “if the king command one thing, and the subordinate magistrate another, we ought rather obey the superior” [Augustine inGrotius]. Scripture prescribes nothing upon the form of government, but simply subjects Christians to that everywhere subsisting, without entering into the question of the right of the rulers (thus, the Roman emperors had by force seized supreme authority, and Rome had, by unjustifiable means, made herself mistress of Asia), because the de facto governors have not been made by chance but by the providence of God. More


Jamieson, Robert, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Vol. 2. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Subjection to Christ

Subjection to Christ

Excerpt


In the present οἰκουμένη man is not supreme over “all things” in the sense denoted; but in the οἰκουμένη to come “of which we speak,” with its far wider bearings, he is, in the Person of Christ, over “all things” thus supreme. Therefore in Christ alone does man attain his appointed destiny. We may here observe how, even without the enlightenment of Scripture, man’s own consciousness reveals to him an idea of his position in creation which, in his present state, he does not realize. The strange apparent contradiction between man as he is and man as he feels he should be, between experience and conscience, between the facts and the ideal of humanity, has long been a patent to philosophers as well as divines.


Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. Hebrews. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

Connect the Testaments

May 6: Community Driven
Judges 9:22–10:18; Philippians 2:19–30; Psalm 68:1–14

By default, we flag our own needs as high priority. And we often measure our church community by how well it’s serving our needs. Caught up in our own spiritual growth, we tend to forget that we’re meant to attend to the physical and spiritual needs of others. Paul upholds Timothy and Epaphroditus to the Philippians as examples of what this type of service should look like.
Paul was intent on sending Timothy to the Philippian church because of his discernment and his servant-like heart. In fact Timothy was the only one suited for the task. Others wouldn’t “sincerely be concerned about [the Philippians’] circumstances. For they all seek their own interests, not those of Jesus Christ” (Phil 2:20–21). Likewise, Paul describes Epaphroditus as a man who suffered to the point of death in order to assist him in his ministry (Phil 2:30).
Both of these men epitomized the natural result of Paul’s commands earlier in hi…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 6      Go To Evening Reading
“We dwell in him.”  — 1 John 4:13
Do you want a house for your soul? Do you ask, “What is the purchase?” It is something less than proud human nature will like to give. It is without money and without price. Ah! you would like to pay a respectable rent! You would love to do something to win Christ? Then you cannot have the house, for it is “without price.” Will you take my Master’s house on a lease for all eternity, with nothing to pay for it, nothing but the ground-rent of loving and serving him for ever? Will you take Jesus and “dwell in him?” See, this house is furnished with all you want, it is filled with riches more than you will spend as long as you live. Here you can have intimate communion with Christ and feast on his love; here are tables well-stored with food for you to live on for ever; in it, when weary, you can find rest with Jesus; and from it you can look out and see heaven itself. Will you have the house? Ah! if you are housele…

My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

May 6th
Liberty on the abyss of the gospel


Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free. Gal. 5:1.

A spiritually minded man will never come to you with the demand—‘Believe this and that’; but with the demand that you square your life with the standards of Jesus. We are not asked to believe the Bible, but to believe the One Whom the Bible reveals (cf. John 5:39–40 ). We are called to present liberty of conscience, not liberty of view. If we are free with the liberty of Christ, others will be brought into that same liberty—the liberty of realizing the dominance of Jesus Christ.
Always keep your life measured by the standards of Jesus. Bow your neck to His yoke alone, and to no other yoke whatever; and be careful to see that you never bind a yoke on others that is not placed by Jesus Christ. It takes God a long time to get us out of the way of thinking that unless everyone sees as we do, they must be wrong. That is never God’s view. There is only one liberty, t…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 6

  Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth
Col. 3:2
He who has his affections set on things above is like one who hangs on by the skies; and, having a secure hold of these, could say, though he saw the world roll away from beneath his feet, “My heart is fixed; my heart is fixed; O Lord, I will sing and give praise!”

Guthrie

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.