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Showing posts from May 9, 2016

Ashurbanipal, King of Assyria

Ashurbanipal, King of Assyria



Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria, carrying a basket for the rebuilding of the temple of Esagila in Babylon, seventh century BCE
Machinist, Peter B. “Assyria, Empire of.” Ed. Mark Allan Powell. The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated) 2011 : 64. Print.

Smyrna agora first level arches

Smyrna agora first level arches


Renew a Right Spirit Within Me

Renew a Right Spirit Within Me

Excerpt


In the O.T., the Holy Spirit was experienced by believers as an enabling divine presence (» Exodus 35-38). But Saul, David’s predecessor, had been deprived of the Spirit’s presence because of his sin (1 Sam. 16:14). David, then, is expressing concern that his sin might be so great that God would also remove His Spirit from him.

There is a vital difference, however, between the enabling presence of the Spirit we see in the O.T. and the indwelling presence of the Spirit seen in the N.T. God’s Spirit is His guarantee of redemption (Eph. 1:13–14).


Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Holy Spirit as Inheritance

Holy Spirit as Inheritance

Ephesians 1:13–14

Excerpt


The Holy Spirit who seals is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance.The “deposit” is more than a pledge which could be returned; it is a down payment with a guarantee of more to come (cf. “the firstfruits of the Spirit,” Rom. 8:23). “A deposit guaranteeing” translates the Greekarrabōn (used elsewhere in the NT only in 2 Cor. 1:22; 5:5). It guarantees believers’ “inheritance” of salvation and heaven (cf. 1 Peter1:4). (See comments on “inheritance” in Eph. 1:18.) In essence, the “deposit” of the Holy Spirit is a little bit of heaven in believers’ lives with a guarantee of much more yet to come.

Hoehner, Harold W. “Ephesians.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 619. Print.

Naples from the Heights

Naples from the Heights


‎This view was taken on the 5th of June, 1894. We are looking eastward across the famous bay of Naples. The site of the city is unequaled on earth. Mountains, plain, bay and sea combine to satisfy the eye, and to stimulate the imagination. There is little in Naples itself to attract the traveler except its collections of antiquities, especially from the exhumed Herculaneum and Pompeii, and some fine works of art, chiefly ancient. Other Italian cities show finer specimens of architecture and more extensive picture galleries. The great opera house, San Carlo, is perhaps the finest structure in the city, and one of the grandest in Europe. But the glory of Naples is to be found in its natural elements. As a graceful pen has said: “The sun shines his brightest, and the zephyrs blow their softest; the sea is of the deepest blue, and the mountains of the most glorious purple.” Mrs. Jameson, in her “Diary of an Ennuyée,” says: “Whoever would truly enjoy nature should …

Sarcophagus of Apis Bull, Sakkara

Sarcophagus of Apis Bull, Sakkara


‎If the Holy Family, according to a traditional account spent a part of their sojourn in Egypt at Memphis they were in sight of the step pyramids. North and west of the step pyramids, was situated the mausoleum of Apis, the sacred bull of Memphis, which had spent its life in its temple (Apieum) and after death, was buried in the vaults of Sakkara. The Apis bull was the sacred animal of Ptah. he was the chief god of Memphis. Rawlinson says: “The Apis bull dwelt in a temple of his own; had his train of attending priests; his harem of cows; his chamberlains, cup bearers and grooms, and on fixed days, was led in a festive procession through the main streets of Memphis.” The people made obeisance to him as he passed. At death he was embalmed and deposited with magnificent jewels, statues and vases in a polished granite sarcophagus, cut out of a single block, and weighing between sixty and seventy tons. His funeral cost as much as one hundred thousand doll…

Connect the Testaments

May 9: Success Deceives
Judges 15:1–17:13; Philippians 4:2–9; Psalm 69:18–70:5

When leaders come to power, there are always people who become insistent on stopping them. It’s incredible how easy it is for people to justify envy or hatred for authority figures. Most of us have made the offhand remark, “I hate that guy.” And in those words, even when they’re meant in jest, we reveal the motives of the human heart. But this doesn’t represent who we’re meant to be—people who live for others.
Samson, an Israelite judge, endured that fate. A young warrior, he had enemies who wanted him dead and would do nearly anything to bring him down—spiritually or physically. The Philistines who opposed him went so far as to burn his wife and her father alive (Judg 15:6). Samson brought these trials on himself by disobeying God and marrying a foreign wife who would ultimately lead him to worship foreign gods. Even so, the acts of violence against him were not just his own doing.
The Philistines, like man…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 9      Go To Evening Reading
         “Who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings.”          —Ephesians 1:3
All the goodness of the past, the present, and the future, Christ bestows upon his people. In the mysterious ages of the past the Lord Jesus was his Father’s first elect, and in his election, he gave us interest, for being chosen in him from before the foundation of the world. He had from all eternity the prerogatives of Sonship, as his Father’s only begotten and well-beloved Son, and he has, in the riches of his grace, by adoption and regeneration, elevated us to sonship also, so that to us he has given “power to become the sons of God.” The eternal covenant, based upon suretiship and confirmed by oath, is ours, for our strong consolation and security. In the permanent settlements of predestinating wisdom and omnipotent decree, the eye of the Lord Jesus was ever fixed on us; and we may rest assured that destiny is not a line which militates against the inter…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 9th
Grasp without reach


Where there is no vision, the people cast off restraint. Proverbs 29:18 (R.V.).

There is a difference between an ideal and a vision. An ideal has no moral inspiration; a vision has. The people who give themselves over to ideals rarely do anything. A man’s conception of Deity may be used to justify his deliberate neglect of his duty. Jonah argued that because God was a God of justice and of mercy, therefore everything would be all right. I may have a right conception of God, and that may be the very reason why I do not do my duty. But wherever there is a vision, there is also a life of rectitude because the vision imparts moral incentive.
Ideas may lull to ruin. Take stock of yourself spiritually and see whether you have ideas only or if you have vision.

‘Ah, but a man’s reach should exceed his grasp,
Or what’s a heaven for?’

“Where there is no vision …” When once we lose sight of God, we begin to be reckless, we cast off certain restraints, we cast off pra…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 9

  Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth
Heb. 12:6
It's told that “earthly cares are a heavenly discipline,” but they are even something better than discipline; they are God’s chariots, sent to take the soul to its high places of triumph. In the Canticles, we are told of “a chariot paved with love.” We cannot always see the love lining to our particular chariot—it often looks very unlovely, but every chariot sent by God must necessarily be paved with love since God is love. It is His love. Indeed, that sends the chariot.
Look upon your chastenings, then, no matter how grievous they may be for the present, as God’s chariots, sent to carry your souls into the “high places” of spiritual achievement and uplifting, and you will find that they are, after all, “paved with love.”

Smith

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.