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Seal of Nethaniah Son of Obadiah

Seal of Nethaniah Son of Obadiah

‎This seal illustrates the sometimes ornamental aspect of ancient Hebrew seals. The stylized gazelles would differentiate this seal from any owned by another Hebrew of the same name. They also ornament the seal pleasantly. The signet ring that made this impression would have been appealing as jewelry in addition to its primary function of validation and identification. The signet belonged to Nethaniah (“Given by Yah”), son of Obadiah (“Serving Yah”). The Bible mentions four Nethaniahs, none listed as the son of any of the 13 named Obadiahs.
‎1 Kgs 18:3, Neh 9:38, Esth 8:8–10, Jer 32:10–11, Jer 36:14, Rev 5:1

Ephes-dammin

Ephes-dammin

Excerpt


Ephes-dammim was located about six kilometers (about four miles) northeast of Socoh. The meaning of this name is uncertain. But it refers to the same place that is called “Pas Dammim” in 1 Chr 11:13 (and, in some versions that are based on the Septuagint, in 2 Sam 23:9). Since the reference is to the same place, translators would be justified in using the same spelling here and in the other passages where this place is referred to.


Omanson, Roger L., and John Ellington. A Handbook on the First Book of Samuel. New York: United Bible Societies, 2001. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Coin Showing Mars

Coin Showing Mars


‎Mars, the Greek Ares, god of war, was a favorite of the militaristic Romans. This Roman gold coin, minted about 217 B.C., portrays Mars (obverse) and the Roman eagle (reverse). It was worth 60 sestertii, or about 15 denarii; the sestertius equalled ¼ of a denarius. The only times the Bible mentions Ares involve the name “Areopagus,” “Mars Hill,” in Acts 17:19, 22, 34. Most scholars believe that Paul addressed the Athenian council called the Areopagus on the hill that gave the council its name. ‎Acts 17:19, 22, 34

Teaching, of the N.T.

Teaching, of the N.T.

Excerpt


‎The ideas included in the word Shalam are prominent in the N.T. There is one remarkable passage in which perfection and oneness are combined together, namely, John 17:23, where the Lord Jesus prays, with respect to His disciples, that they may be ‘perfected in one,’ or, more literally, ‘completed into one.’ The same idea runs through the N.T.; the perfection of each part of the body depends upon the completeness of the whole, and vice versa (1 John 4:2). Christ is ‘our peace’ because He has made both (i.e. both Jew and Gentile) one, and has done away with the middle wall of the partition; the twain He has created in Himself into one new man, so making peace, and has reconciled both in one body to God by means of the Cross (Eph. 2:14–16). There is one body, the Church, and one Spirit, in whom both Jew and Gentile have access to the Father through Christ. …


Girdlestone, Robert Baker. Synonyms of the Old Testament: Their Bearing on Christian Doctrine. Oak Har…

God’s Grace is the Model for Forgiveness

God’s Grace is the Model for Forgiveness

Excerpt


Selling the man into slavery would recover virtually none of the loss, though it might abate some of the king’s anger: the most expensive slave recorded would sell for only a talent, the average being one-twentieth to one-fifth of that (Jeremias 1972:211). Jewish custom prohibited the sale of women and children, but Jesus’ hearers recognized that a pagan king wouldn’t care about such just technicalities (compare m. Soṭa 3:8; t. Soṭa 2:9; Jeremias 1972:180, 211; Derrett 1970:38; Via 1967:138–39). In all, the king was bound to lose at least 9,999 talents (as much as 99,990,000 days’ wages, or roughly 275,000 years’ wages for an average worker) despite the sale. Perhaps this was one reason the king canceled the debt at the pitiable sight of the fool offering to pay it all back.


Keener, Craig S. Matthew. Vol. 1. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1997. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Genesis 6 and the Sons of God

Genesis 6 and the Sons of God

Excerpt


‎Several views exist regarding the identity of the sons of God in Gen 6. These interpretations also affect how we should understand biblical references to supernatural beings including angels and foreign gods.

Sons of God as Divine Beings
‎The sons of God may be divine beings (e.g., angels). If so, the sin in question was a transgression of the human realm by these heavenly beings. Their involvement with human women led to a widespread breakdown in morality and an increase in wickedness and corruption. The offspring of these unions, the nephilim (Gen 6:4), were considered quasi-divine and possessed unusual height (“giants”).

‎This was the dominant view among Jewish and Christian thinkers until after the fourth century ad, when Augustine championed an alternative (see below). It was also the exclusive view until the mid-second centuryad. …


Barry, John D. et al. Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 10: Old, Wise, and Desperately in Need of God
Judges 18:1–19:30; Philippians 4:10–20;Psalm 71:1–24

Sometimes we expect that we’ll naturally grow in faith as we grow older. We tend to see elderly people as those who have been molded and shaped by life—rock-solid in their faith and untapped sources of wisdom. That, or we speed around them in the grocery aisle, blissfully disengaged with the reality that our bodies, too, will slow down and endure pain.
While the psalmist seems to express a shadow of both these perspectives in Psa 71, neither of them is complete. Adopting the point of view of an elderly person, he reflects on his life. His prayer to God shows us that maturing in faith isn’t automatic.
The elderly man is respected by others, but he doesn’t trust in the honor that some ascribe to him. He knows that Yahweh is the source of his strength, and he praises Him continually: “I have become a wonder to many, but you are my strong refuge. My mouth is filled with your praise, with …

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 10      Go To Evening Reading

         “But now is Christ risen from the dead.”
         —1 Corinthians 15:20

The whole system of Christianity rests upon the fact that “Christ is risen from the dead;” for, “If Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain: ye are yet in your sins.” The divinity of Christ finds its surest proof in his resurrection since he was “Declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.” It would not be unreasonable to doubt his Deity if he had not risen. Moreover, Christ’s sovereignty depends on upon his resurrection, “For to this end Christ both died, and rose, and revived, that he might be Lord both of the dead and live.” Again, our justification, that choice blessing of the covenant, is linked with Christ’s triumphant victory over death and the grave; for “He was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification.” Nay, more, our v…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 10th
Take the initiative


Add to your faith virtue … (“Furnish your faith with resolution.”) (MOFFATT) 2 Peter 1:5.

“Add” means there is something we have to do. We are in danger of forgetting that we cannot do what God does and that God will not do what we can do. We cannot save ourselves nor sanctify ourselves, God does that; but God will not give us good habits, He will not give us character, He will not make us walk upright. We have to do all that ourselves, we have to work out the salvation God has worked in. “Add” means to get into the habit of doing things, and in the initial stages it is difficult. To take the initiative is to make a beginning, to instruct yourself in the way you have to go.
Beware of the tendency of asking the way when you know it perfectly well. Take the initiative, stop hesitating, and take the first step. Be resolute when God speaks, act in faith immediately on what He says, and never revise your decisions. If you hesitate when God tells you to do a th…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 10

  The blood of Jesus Christ, his Son, cleanseth us from all sin
1 John 1:7
Learn a lesson from the eye of the miner, who all day long is working amid the flying coal dust. When he emerges in the light of day his face may be grimy enough; but his eyes are clear and lustrous because the fountain of tears in the lachrymal gland is ever pouring its gentle tides over the eye, cleansing away each speck of dust as soon as it alights.
Is not this the miracle of cleansing which our spirits need in such a world as this? And this is what our blessed Lord is prepared to do for us by His cleansing blood if only we will trust Him.

F. B. Meyer

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.