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Showing posts from May 13, 2016

Entrance to Petra

Entrance to Petra

‎Petra, situated about 46 miles (74 km) south of the Dead Sea in the ancient region of Edom, is often identified with the biblical Sela. Petra was the capital city of the Nabatean kingdom. The Nabateans clashed with such Jewish rulers as Alexander Jannaeus and Herod the Great. By political maneuvering, they extended their kingdom as far as Damascus. Aretas IV, who ruled the city when Paul first visited there, was Nabatean. ‎2 Kgs 14:7–10, Isa 16:1, 2 Cor 11:32–33

Ephes-dammin

Ephes-dammin

Excerpt


Ephes-dammim was located about six kilometers (about four miles) northeast of Socoh. The meaning of this name is uncertain. But it refers to the same place that is called “Pas Dammim” in 1 Chr 11:13 (and, in some versions that are based on the Septuagint, in 2 Sam 23:9). Since the reference is to the same place, translators would be justified in using the same spelling here and in the other passages where this place is referred to.


Omanson, Roger L., and John Ellington. A Handbook on the First Book of Samuel. New York: United Bible Societies, 2001. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Temple Ruins in Corinth

Temple Ruins in Corinth

‎The ruined Temple of Apollo at Corinth.

Tiglath-pileser III

Tiglath-pileser III


‎745–727 B.C. From a bas-relief on the walls of the palace of Tiglath-pileser III. discovered at Calah (Nimrod). Now in the British Museum.

Warning Inscription, Herod’s Temple

Warning Inscription, Herod’s Temple


‎Paul knew that his reputation—a bad one, to his enemies—preceded him to Jerusalem after his third missionary journey. Also, Agabus warned him of trouble brewing (Acts 21:10–11). Still, the turn of events may have surprised Paul. His enemies falsely accused him of bringing a Gentile into the Temple enclosure. The penalty? Death for the Gentile, as this Greek warning inscription from that enclosure’s wall, tersely states. The sign, now in Istanbul’s Archeology Museum, specifies no penalty for the Jew bringing a Gentile there, but it was understood that he too would die. ‎Acts 21:10–11, 28, Acts 24:17–18 ‎Image by Tamar Hayardeni, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Free use, attribution required

Roman road with milestone

Roman road with milestone

‎The Romans fortified various roads that were already used for centuries. This way they were able to expedite and expand commercial trading, but they also could deploy and move their troops much faster on good roads. Several of these roads are still visible on the ground. The roads fortified by the Romans also were furnished with milestones (picture on the right). These stones mention the emperor who ordered the construction of the road and indicate the number of miles remaining to the next city. With the help of these mile markers, it is possible even today to figure out the numerous road links that were available in Roman times. ‎Matt 5:41

Marble Flower, Thyatira Ruins

Marble Flower, Thyatira Ruins

Connect the Testaments

May 13: Shipwrecked
Ruth 3:1–4:22; 1 Timothy 1:12–20; Psalm 73:11–28

“I am setting before you this instruction, Timothy my child, in accordance with the prophecies spoken long ago about you, in order that by them you may fight the good fight, having faith and a good conscience, which some, because they have rejected these, have suffered shipwreck concerning their faith” (1 Tim 1:18–19).
Paul had experienced being shipwrecked multiple times in his life, and in this passage, he metaphorically ascribes his experience to that of people who turn from faith in Christ. The imagery of being shipwrecked captures the spiritual state of aimlessness that results from a misguided conscience—one that isn’t grounded in faith. Among those who experienced this shipwreck were Hymenaeus and Alexander, former believers who became blasphemers. They had known the truth of Jesus but were now publicly opposing it (1 Tim 1:20).
Paul admits he had once been a blasphemer himself, but he was “shown mercy because…

Morning and Evening

Go To Morning Reading      Evening, May 13
         “Thou art my portion, O Lord.”          —Psalm 119:57
Look at thy possessions, O believer, and compare thy portion with a lot of thy fellowmen. Some of them have their portion in the field; they are rich, and their harvests yield them a golden increase; but what are harvests compared with thy God, who is the God of harvests? What are bursting granaries compared with him, who is the Husbandman, and feeds thee with the bread of heaven? Some have their portion in the city; their wealth is abundant, and flows to them in constant streams until they become a very reservoir of gold; but what is gold compared with thy God? Thou couldst not live on it; it could not sustain thy spiritual life. Put it on a troubled conscience, and could it allay its pangs? Apply it to a desponding heart, and see if it could stay a solitary groan, or give one grief the less? But thou hast God, and in him, thou hast more than gold or riches ever could buy. Some h…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 13th
The habit of a good conscience


A conscience void of offence toward God, and toward men. Acts 24:16.

God’s commands are given to the life of His Son in us, consequently to the human nature in which His Son has been formed, His commands are complicated, but immediately we obey they become divinely smooth.
Conscience is that faculty in me which attaches itself to the highest that I know and tells me what the highest I know demands that I do. It is the eye of the soul which looks out either towards God or towards what it regards as the highest, and therefore conscience records differently in different people. If I am in the habit of steadily facing myself with God, my conscience will always introduce God’s perfect law and indicate what I should do. The point is, will I obey? I have to make an effort to keep my conscience so sensitive that I walk without offence. I should be living in such perfect sympathy with God’s Son, that in every circumstance the spirit of my mind is renewe…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 13

Whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted
Luke 14:11
… If you ask the way to the crown ’tis by the cross; to the mountain—’tis by the valley; to exaltation—’tis he that humbleth himself.

J. H. Evans

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.