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Showing posts from May 19, 2016

Barren Results

Barren Results

Jude 1–2 Chapter summary. Jude modestly identifies himself and greets fellow believers (vv. 1–2). He had hoped to write a positive letter about the salvation they enjoy but instead felt compelled by the appearance of so many false teachers to write a letter of warning (vv. 3–4). History has shown that God punishes the wicked and perverse (vv. 5–7). He will surely punish the arrogant false teachers who reject authority and approach spiritual realities with no more understanding than brute beasts (vv. 8–10). These false teachers follow the example of others in history whom God rejected and punished (v. 11) and are like specters, walking among them without life or the capacity to enrich those who do have life (vv. 12–13). Here Jude approvingly quotes a contemporary Jewish religious tract: The writer is correct in his vision of the Lord coming to judge ungodly sinners—like these false teachers who follow their own evil desires (vv. 14–16). Such persons are sure to infiltrate…

The Rejoicing Over Goliath’s Death

The Rejoicing Over Goliath’s Death
‎ In the pursuit of the Philistines, David apparently took no part. He had done his work, by arousing the religious faith of his countrymen, reinspiring them with their old confidence in the right. Also, he had stirred the superstitious terror of their enemies. Now, in high, uplifted mood, the young champion paused to glory in the might of God. ‎Doubtless there were many to join him in his joy. They stripped the mail from the huge body of Goliath, handling the armor with amazement, weighing and measuring it, and finally bearing it in triumph to David’s home, whence ultimately it was placed in one of their temples as a memorial. The mighty sword of the giant, which had wrought his own death, was also sanctified and was placed in the care of the highpriest of Israel, where in later days David was to find it for his own good use. The head of Goliath, the grimmest trophy of all, was borne by David himself to Jerusalem, that all the people might see and …

Arches, Haram Esh-Sherif

Arches, Haram Esh-Sherif

‎The Jews’ Feast of Tabernacles was at hand. Jesus sent His disciples on before Him to Jerusalem and afterward went up Himself, “not openly, but as it were in secret.”—John 7:2–8–10. Then He Himself came to the Holy City and taught.—John 7:14–l7. We look in the picture above at the site of the temple as it appears to-day. The Haram esh-Sherif, the “Noble Sanctuary,” is the pride and ornament of the City of Jerusalem.” The massive and lofty walls that surround it, the broad, elevated platform, encircled by graceful arches, its pulpits and prayer-niches and cupolas; and the beautiful Mosque of Omar, rising above all and glistening in the sunbeams; the marble fountains, groups of olive and cypress trees, all together form a picture which is scarcely surpassed in the world. Fergusson proves the arch to have been used in the time of Sargon, 721 B. C., but there are “too many Herodian signs to permit us to indulge the dream.” One writer relates: “With no other esco…

Jerusalem: Church of the Assumption—Festival

Jerusalem: Church of the Assumption—Festival

‎Jerusalem. On the festival of the Virgin Mary, gladiolus flowers are strewn at the sides of the place that marks her tomb, the lamps are polished and lit, and candles burn above the tomb.

Elijah Prays for the Widow’s Son

Elijah Prays for the Widow’s Son

‎The poor widow readily brought Elijah drink, even as Rebecca had once given water to Abraham’s steward. But when the prophet asked further that she should take him to her house and give him food, she burst into weeping and told him her sad plight. She had at home but one more handful of meal and a trifle of oil. With the sticks, she was gathering she meant to cook these into one last meal for herself and her little son, and then lie down and die. ‎At once Elijah saw why he had been sent thither, that it was not solely for his own good, and that God values every soul, that He knows and feels for every pang. “And Elijah said unto her, Fear not.… For thus saith the Lord God of Israel. The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, until the day that the Lord sendeth rain upon the earth.” So these two strangely met companions went together to the widow’s house, and dwelt there, sustained equally by the bounty of the Lord. So als…

Uses Of Church History

Uses Of Church History

Excerpt


‎The Epistle to the Hebrews describes, in stirring eloquence, the cloud of witnesses from the old dispensation for the encouragement of the Christians. Why should not the greater cloud of apostles, evangelists, martyrs, confessors, fathers, reformers, and saints of every age and tongue, since the coming of Christ, be held up for the same purpose? They were the heroes of Christian faith and love, the living epistles of Christ, the salt of the earth, the benefactors and glory of our race; and it is impossible rightly to study their thoughts and deeds, their lives and deaths, without being elevated, edified, comforted, and encouraged to follow their holy example, that we at last, by the grace of God, be received into their fellowship, to spend with them a blessed eternity in the praise and enjoyment of the same God and Saviour. …


Schaff, Philip, and David Schley Schaff. History of the Christian Church. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1910. Print.

A Merciful and Faithful High Priest

A Merciful and Faithful High Priest

Excerpt


Whatever their needs or trials, their Captain is adequate to help them since He ministers to Abraham’s descendants, not angels. The expression “Abraham’s descendants” (lit., “Abraham’s seed”) may point to the Jewishness of the writer’s audience, but even Gentile Christians could claim to be the “seed of Abraham” in a spiritual sense (Gal. 3:29). The help which the Captain gives to these His followers is again predicated on the fact that He was made like His brothers in every way (Heb. 2:17), that is, both in terms of becoming incarnate and by virtue of suffering. Here for the first time, the writer introduced the thought of His priesthood, which he elaborated on later. For now, he was content to affirm that this identification with “His brothers” had made possible a priesthood characterized both by mercy and fidelity in service to God. This involved, as its basis, atonement for the sins of the people. Of this too the author said later, but …

Connect the Testaments

May 19: Outline for Honor
1 Chronicles 7:1–40; 1 Timothy 5:1–9; Psalm 78:30–52

In most Western cultures today, we’ve lost our connection with the elderly. With one grandparent living halfway across the country and the others having died before I was born, I wasn’t around older people until I met my wife and her family. Unlike me, my wife had the privilege of knowing her great-grandparents. She has a strong sense of tradition and respect for the elderly, as well as a deep desire to help them in all aspects of life, and she has been able to teach me to do the same. Paul is dealing with a similar experience in his first letter to Timothy.
Paul says to Timothy, “Do not rebuke an older man, but appeal to him as a father, younger men as brothers, older women as mothers, younger women as sisters, with all purity. Honor widows who are truly widows” (1 Tim 5:1–3). By “honor,” Paul means showing a deep sense of concern and an earnest, regular desire to help them financially and with their daily …

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 19      Go To Evening Reading
         “I have seen servants upon horses, and princes walking as servants upon the earth.”          —Ecclesiastes 10:7
Upstarts frequently usurp the highest places, while the truly great pine in obscurity. This is a riddle in providence whose solution will one day gladden the hearts of the upright; but it is so common a fact, that none of us should murmur if it should fall to our own lot. When our Lord was upon earth, although he is the Prince of the kings of the earth, yet he walked the footpath of weariness and service as the Servant of servants: what wonder is it if his followers, who are princes of the blood, should also be looked down upon as inferior and contemptible persons? The world is upside down, and therefore, the first are last and the last first. See how the servile sons of Satan lord it in the earth! What a high horse they ride! How they lift up their horn on high! Haman is in the court while Mordecai sits in the gate; David …

My Utmost for His Highest

May 19th
“Out of the wreck, I rise”


Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Romans 8:35.

God does not keep a man immune from trouble; He says—“I will be with him in trouble.” It does not matter what actual troubles in the most extreme form get hold of a man’s life, not one of them can separate him from his relationship to God. We are “more than conquerors in all these things.” Paul is not talking about imaginary things, but of things that are desperately actual; and he says we are super-victors in the midst of them, not by our ingenuity, or by our courage, or by anything other than the fact that not one of them affects our relationship to God in Jesus Christ. Rightly or wrongly, we are where we are, exactly in the condition we are in. I am sorry for the Christian who has not something in his circumstances he wishes was not there.
“Shall tribulation …?” Tribulation is never a noble thing; but let tribulation be what it may—exhausting, galling, fatiguing, it is not able to separ…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 17

  Seek ye first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you
        Matt. 6:33

We need have only one care, that we put the first thing first—faithfulness to God. Then all else we need for both worlds will be supplied. God will never fail us; but we forget, sometimes, in our rejoicing over such an assurance, that we must fulfill our part if we would claim the divine promise.
It will not always be easy. Tomorrow it may mean a distasteful task, a disagreeable duty, a costly sacrifice for one who does not seem worthy. Life is full of sore testings of our willingness to follow the Good Shepherd. We have not the slightest right to claim this assurance unless we have taken Christ as the guide of our life.

J. R. Miller







May 18

  His praise shall continually be in my mouth
        Ps. 34:1

Let not thy praises be transients—a fit of music, and then the instrument hung by the wall till another gaudy day of some remarkable providence makes thee ta…